Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-x

read more

Tradition and Orthodoxy, 1934-1939: Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xxxvi

This volume presciently opens with a Criterion “Commentary” of January 1934. T. S. Eliot has taken up two unrelated phenomena that will later converge: the power of a historian’s rhetoric and the impotence of liberal Christianity. In the first section of the commentary, Eliot brings a light touch to the problem of historical writing. Although he admires the skill of Winston Churchill’s biography of the Duke of Marlborough, Eliot frowns on the oratorical style – “constantly pitching the tone a little too high” – in which the writer, too accustomed to public speaking, seems to pause...

read more

Editorial Procedures and Principles

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xxxvii-xlvi

Eliot’s uncollected prose makes up the vast majority of the writings published in his lifetime and spans the period from his stories in the Smith Academy Record in 1905 to his final autobiographical note for the Harvard College Class of 1910: Fifty-fifth Anniversary Report, contributed in late December 1964, shortly before his death on 4 January 1965. These writings include hundreds of reviews and essays contributed to periodicals; commentaries in the Criterion; letters to the press (printed here and in the Letters; in each place they appear in different contexts of personal letters and public prose, thereby...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xlvii-l

Our greatest debt is to the late Valerie Eliot, for her tireless devotion over many years to collecting, preserving, and ordering her husband’s multiform writings, and for her confidence and trust in commissioning The Complete Prose of T. S. Eliot: The Critical Edition. We are also indebted to her personal assistant, Debbie Whitfield, who has graciously facilitated our access to editorial materials, and to trustees Judith Hooper and Clare Reihill of the Eliot Estate.

We are indebted to the late Finn M. W. Caspersen, the late William B. Warren, and the trustees of the Hodson Trust for a...

List of Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. li-liv

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. lv-lvi

Part I: Essays, Reviews, Commentaries, and Public Letters

1934

read more

A Commentary (Jan 1934)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-12

I am quite willing to believe that Mr. Winston Churchill is an honester historian than Macaulay;1 that his facts are indisputable, and his judgement of motive and character sound. His Marlborough may, for aught I know, deserve to the full the encomiums pronounced upon it by reviewers with no uncertain voice, the roses strewn with no niggard hand.2 In the foregoing sentence I have endeavoured to trace a mimic miniature of the virtues of Mr. Churchill’s prose style. Ours is said to be an age of specialization; and for specialized departments of thought, we find specialized...

read more

The Blackshirts. To the Editor of The Church Times

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-14

Sir, – The letter of Mr. Pierce-Butler in your issue of Jan. 26 seems to me to express an attitude towards Fascism, on the part of pious Christians, which is likely to spread, and which therefore deserves close examination.2

I am perfectly ready to accept Mr. Pierce-Butler’s testimony gathered among the young people of his acquaintance, and I am very glad to hear it.3 But, with all due respect, I believe that he misses the point. The point is not whether a large number of people, with or without the inspiration and example of Sir Oswald Mosley and Lord Rothermere, are both...

read more

After Strange Gods: A Primer of Modern Heresy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-55

Le monde moderne avilit.3 It also provincialises, and it can also corrupt.

The three lectures which follow were not undertaken as exercises in literary criticism. If the reader insists upon considering them as such, I should like to guard against misunderstanding as far as possible. The lectures are not designed to set forth, even in the most summary form, my opinions of the work of contemporary writers: they are concerned with certain ideas in illustration of which I have drawn upon the work of some of the few modern writers whose work I know. I am not primarily concerned either with...

read more

Le Morte Darthur. A review of Le Morte Darthur, Reduced into Englisshe by Sir Thomas Malory

Text prepared by A. S. Mott

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-61

This is the text of Le Morte Darthur, printed after Caxton, with no prefaces, introductions or notes, and a very beautiful rubricated piece of book-making indeed. It is for those who appreciate Malory and can afford to possess his book in as grand a form as anyone could wish; and those who enjoy Malory ought to be willing to pay him this honour if they can afford it. I mean no disrespect to this wholly admirable edition in suggesting that we need three more editions to follow it: (1) a cheap edition of the text; (2) a scholarly edition with a full commentary by some person as learned as...

read more

Postcard. Samuel Taylor Coleridge, 1772-1834

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 62

When five years old had read the Arabian Nights. Christ’s Hospital and Cambridge. Metaphysician and poet. His life was ill-regulated; weak, slothful, a voracious reader, he contracted an unhappy marriage and much later the habit of taking laudanum. Described his own character in his great Ode to Dejection (1802).2 The greatest English literary critic, he was also the greatest intellectual force of his time. Probably influenced Newman, Maurice, and the Young Tories;3 and died as the guest of Mr. Gillman of Highgate.4...

read more

Mr. Eliot’s Virginian Lectures. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 63-64

Sir, – I have read with keen interest Mr. Pound’s kindly note upon my Virginian lectures, in your columns; and I find myself in cordial agreement with the major part of what I am able to understand of it.1 What I do not understand include statements which, to me, have no meaning.

I agree with paragraphs 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, and 13, though not necessarily with every inference that might be drawn from them.2 Though I fail to see their relevance to the subject of Mr. Pound’s note, the truths contained are so important that no opportunity should be missed for repeating...

read more

The Theology of Economics. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-66

Sir, – To some, at least, of your readers it must be a matter of regret that a paper which is able to express itself so clearly on political and economic matters should have to take refuge (page 532, lower right hand corner) in cloudy truculence when it concerns itself with ecclesiastical polity.1 As one who was in sympathy with the Archbishop of York’s proposals before they were known to the New English Weekly, I should be interested to know what this paper thinks of them;2 and as you say only that “There can be no hesitation in the minds of normal people about the side they are...

read more

Shakespearian Criticism I. From Dryden to Coleridge

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 67-79

I do not propose in this brief sketch to offer a compendium of all that has been written about Shakespeare in three languages in the period I have to cover. For that the reader may turn to Mr. Augustus Ralli’s History of Shakespearian Criticism (Oxford: 2 volumes).2 The purpose of a contribution on “Shakespeare Criticism” to such a volume as this, as it seems to me, should be to provide a plan, or pattern, for the reading of the principal texts of Shakespeare criticism. Such a vast amount there is, such a sum of Shakespeare criticism increasing every day at compound interest, that the student of Shakespeare may well wonder whether he should consume his...

read more

A Commentary (Apr 1934)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 80-83

I have been reading (it is not a new book, for it was published in 1931) the Évocations: Souvenirs 1905-1911 of our friend Henri Massis.1 The book should be, for anybody, an interesting and valuable document upon a period; but [it] has a more personal interest for me, inasmuch as M. Massis is my contemporary, and the period of which he writes includes the time of my own brief residence in Paris. I remember the appearance of M. Massis’s first conspicuous piece of writing; though I was ignorant at the time, as...

read more

Mr. T. S. Eliot’s Quandaries. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 84-86

Sir, – Wishing to engross as little of your space as may be, I shall try to comment upon Mr. Pound’s observations (558) and your own notes (576) briefly in one letter.1

First, I suggest to Mr. Pound that the review mentioned in the Observer is definitely below the level of “average London intelligence.” I do not know how to prove this.2

Mr. Pound does not make clear to me what is the peculiar malady of my logic. I should like to know. Naturally, if my diagnosis is wrong, my remedy...

read more

Modern Heresies. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 87-88

Sir, – There appears to be left one matter upon which Mr. Pound and I do not agree: namely, the vital problem of what is and what is not blue china. Let Mr. Pound dust his own blue china and let me potter about with mine.1 Incidentally, the personalities of Mr. Chesterton and Dean Inge, and Mr. Pound’s lack of respect for them, seem to me to be totally irrelevant.2

I am not convinced that my own concern for the future of society, in England A.D. 1934, is any less than that of Mr. Pound...

read more

Prefatory Note to The Rock: A Pageant Play...Book of Words by T. S. Eliot.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 89-92

I cannot consider myself the author of the “play,” but only of the words which are printed here.2 The scenario, incorporating some historical scenes suggested by the Rev. R. Webb Odell, is by E. Martin Browne, under whose direction I wrote the choruses and dialogues, and submissive to whose expert criticism I rewrote much of them.3 Of only one scene am I literally the author: for this scene and of course for the sentiments expressed in the choruses I must assume the responsibility.

I should like to make grateful acknowledgment of the collaboration of Dr. Martin Shaw, who composed...

read more

“The Rock.” To the Editor of The Spectator

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 93-94

Sir, – Mr. Verschoyle’s amiable review of The Rock in your issue of June 1st leaves me wondering what he thinks that the production was intended to be.2 The “play” makes no pretence of being a “contribution to English dramatic literature”: it is a revue. My only seriously dramatic aim was to show that there is a possible rôle for the Chorus: an aim which would have failed completely without the aid of a perfectly trained group of speakers like Miss Fogerty’s.3 And to consider The Rock as an “official apologia” for church-building is to lay a weight upon it which this rock was never intended to bear.4 It is not an...

read more

“The Rock.” To the Editor of The New Statesman and Nation

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 95

Sir, – Mr. Francis Birrell’s notice of The Rock in your issue of to-day is, I dare say, quite excessively laudatory; but I am naturally disposed to accept without protest any praise that is not robbed from others. But when he says that “all the way through, both in the prose and verse passages and in what the film writers would call the continuation,” I show myself “a greater...

read more

“The Use of Poetry.” To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 96-98

Sir, – Now, Mr. Orage,1 Sir, it seems to me the time has come to engross a little more of your space to do some sweeping up after Ezra. One can’t be everywhere at once; and a good deal of litter has accumulated: I will only deal with what concerns me.2

Mr. Pound has done your readers a disservice in suggesting that a book of mine, which is an unsatisfactory attempt to say something worth saying, is more negligible than another book of mine which is an unsatisfactory attempt to say a variety of things most of which were not worth...

read more

A Commentary (July 1934)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-106

The aims of the English Association are set forth as follows:

(a) To promote the due recognition of English as an essential element in the national education.
(b) To discuss methods of teaching English and the correlation of School and University work.
(c) To encourage and facilitate advanced study in English literature and language.
(d) To unite all those who are interested in English studies; to bring teachers into contact with...

read more

A review of The Oxford Handbook of Religious Knowledge

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 107

This handbook was prepared by a committee, at the request of the Bishop of Oxford, for the use of teachers (of pupils over the age of eleven) in that diocese.1 But the task has been performed so admirably that the book is to be recommended also to parents for private use, for introducing...

read more

A review of The Mystical Doctrine of St. John of the Cross

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 108

The description above indicates the method which has been followed. The arrangement is excellent.1 For anyone who wishes to make a study of the work of St. John (a Spanish writer little known in this country) this is an admirable introduction; and for ordinary educated people, will give all that they need to know. While very few persons ever reach a stage so advanced that they can adopt St. John of the Cross as their guide, and must...

read more

In Sincerity and Earnestness: New Britain As I See It

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 109-112

I rather wish that these remarks were not to be headed “In Sincerity and Earnestness,” because I should like to think that my sincerity and earnestness could be taken for granted; but that is the Editor’s business, not mine.1

I suffer, like most of my generation, in not having been brought up to think about politics and economics. (But if we had, we would certainly have been taught wrong.) It seemed that politics could be left to an inferior class of people, actuated by vanity and love of power, who liked politics; and it seemed that economics was a special study for a set of people...

read more

A review of Christian Sociology for To-day: An Abridged Edition of “Faith and Society,” by Maurice B. Reckitt

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 113

Faith and Society was, as a matter of fact, much too long a book.1 Mr. Reckitt devoted so much space to an account of various organisations and movements in his field, as to be in danger of defeating his own purpose; the reader might have been tempted to wonder why, with so much...

read more

John Marston

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 114-125

John Marston, the dramatist, has been dead three hundred years. The date of his death, June 25, 1634, is one of the few certain facts that we know about him; but the appearance of the first volume of a new edition of his works, as well as an edition of his best-known play by itself, is a more notable event than the arrival of his tercentenary.2* For Marston has enjoyed less attention, from either scholars or critics, than any of his contemporaries of equal or greater rank; and for both scholars and critics he remains a territory of unexplored riches and risks. The position of most of his...

read more

The Problem of Education

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 126-130

At the present time I am not very much interested in the only subject which I am supposed to be qualified to write about: that is, one kind of literary criticism. I am not very much interested in literature, except dramatic literature; and I am largely interested in subjects which I do not yet know very much about: theology, politics, economics, and education. I am moved at the moment to say something on the last of these subjects; so, if my comments appear very scrappy, I can only say that it is hard to start one’s own education over again when one is in the forties. I have had some...

read more

To the Editor of Social Credit

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 131

Sir, – Economics is a subject I have never been able to understand, but I suspect that one reason why I cannot understand it is that orthodox economics rests upon moral assumptions which I could not possibly accept, if they were laid bare. The moral foundations of Communism and Fascism seem to me equally unacceptable, and their economic and monetary theories, if any, do not seem to me to differ very interestingly from...

read more

A Commentary (Oct 1934)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 132-137

The annual report of the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty grows yearly more impressive.1 The map of England and Wales is dotted with preserves of the National Trust, the greatest success being apparently in the Lake District.2 And what is remarkable, and most commendable, is the fact that the work has been done by the labour and the benefactions of a considerable number of persons.3 The total of donations, to the end of 1933, appears to be under three hundred and fifteen thousand pounds,4 and the list includes a great many individuals; a few years...

read more

Religious Drama and the Church

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 138-141

The possibility of a religious drama depends upon a kind of reciprocity. The dramatists must be able to provide a drama which will be really useful to the Church; and the Church must be ready to make itself useful to those who want to write drama. When I say the Church, I am thinking primarily of those in authority, but I imply also the goodwill of the laity. For the audience must be willing to learn from the playwrights, and the playwrights must be willing to learn from the audience.

I do not think (with all due respect) that religious drama has much to gain from those dramatists, even if they...

read more

What Does the Church Stand For?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 142-145

I observe that the propounder of the question “What does the Church stand for?” in your columns uses the terms “Church” and “Churches” interchangeably (he speaks of “different branches of the Christian Churches”), and this raises a doubt in my mind as to what point of view, at least for the purpose of the moment, he is maintaining. And it is very difficult to reply to any criticism of the Church which is made from an unspecified point of view.1 To discuss the shortcomings of the Church with another person who is inside it is one thing; to defend the existence of the Church against those who are outside of it is quite another. The Church is not a public...

read more

Orage: Memories

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 146-147

I had a feeling of loss when Orage gave up the New Age and went to America; I had a feeling of relief when he returned and started the New English Weekly; I had a feeling of very deep loss when I read of his death the other day. It was not a personal loss, for my meetings with him, over a period of some eighteen years, had been infrequent and in public places. It is something quite as disturbing as a private loss: it is a public loss.2

Many people will remember Orage as the tireless and wholly disinterested evangelist of monetary reform; many will remember him as the best...

1935

read more

A Commentary (Jan 1935)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 148-153

The death of A. R. Orage remains the most important event and the most fitting to commemorate in this commentary.1 For a time I thought that everything to be said had been said by the writers who contributed to the obituary number (November 15th) of The New English Weekly.2 Seldom has a more remarkable tribute appeared in a less public way; a dozen or more of the writers were men who should be able to command space in The Times for any public letter they wanted to write3 – but I cannot think that any of the writers could have written quite as they did, except to an...

read more

Notes on the Way [I]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 154-157

Today (December 29th) is the Feast of St. Thomas of Canterbury, better known to most people as Thomas Becket; and I seize the opportunity to mention that fact, because it is hardly likely that anybody else will.2 I have discovered his Mass in a curious volume called The English Missal (curious because it includes Joseph of Calasanz and the Blessing of Eggs, but has nothing to say about Charles, King and Martyr). The Introit is Gaudeamus, “Rejoice we all in the Lord”; but I suspect that St. Thomas himself might have preferred to be remembered with the Introit for Boxing...

read more

Dowson’s Poems. To the Editor of the Times Literary Supplement

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 158

Sir, – In the interesting review of Ernest Dowson’s Poems in your last issue, your reviewer suggests that I caught the phrase “Falls the shadow” from Dowson’s “Cynara.”1 This derivation had not occurred to my mind, but I believe it to be correct, because the lines he quotes have always run in my head, and because I regard Dowson as a poet whose technical innovations have been underestimated. But I do not think that...

read more

Notes on the Way [II]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-165

There is no subject of the first importance to everyone today on which there is more confusion than that of Peace and War. That we all dislike war and wish to avert it only increases the confusion: for we not only have very different notions of how it is to be averted, but very different notions of why it is a bad thing. Most people, I fear, do not think it necessary to devote much attention to the problem of why they believe War to be a bad thing – it is their first assumption. This failure to examine assumptions, to “dissociate ideas,” may lead them to conclusions which...

read more

Notes on the Way [III]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 166-172

There seems to be, at the present time, a good deal of chat going on about Liberty, and no wonder. We have not only the shadow of the Totalitarian State abroad, but smaller creeping shadows at home. There was the Lord Chief Justice thundering about encroachments upon the liberty of the judiciary; and at every other street corner we are reminded that we are no longer at liberty to get ourselves run over.1

It occurs to me that the subject of Liberty may be treated in the same way as the subject of Peace and War. We all love Peace, and we all...

read more

T. S. Eliot’s Notes on the Way [I]. To the Editor of Time and Tide

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-174

Sir, – There is one point in Miss Rebecca West’s letter in your issue of January 12th, which seems to me to call for an answer.1 I feel that Miss West fails to represent accurately the attitude of Father Herbert Thurston; so that the uninformed reader might imagine that Fr. Thurston’s interest in “supernormal manifestations” was of exactly the same kind as that of Messrs. Huxley or Mr. Gerald Heard.2 One does not even need to read Fr. Thurston’s books to be made aware of the difference. On the jacket of one that I have at hand are the words: “The Church has forbidden...

read more

Notes on the Way [IV]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-181

As this is the last of my ten-minute lunch hour sermons, I am tempted to try to deal, in a rambling way, with two or three subjects in the course of one Note. One is the curious subject of Work and Leisure: curious, because the majority of publicists seem to be convinced that work is a good thing, and that everybody ought to have plenty of it; and a minority are convinced that work is a bad thing, and that everybody should have as much leisure as possible. The latter allege, not without plausibility, that work formerly done by manual labour is increasingly performed by...

read more

Mr. Milne and the War [I]. To the Editor of Time and Tide

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 182-184

Sir, – In his letter in your issue of January 19th, Mr. A. A. Milne says that he supposed that when he had finished thinking about war, everybody would know exactly what he thought. Not knowing that Mr. Milne had begun thinking about war, I did not know that he had finished. Long before I had finished reading his book, I knew what he felt about war; and with his feelings I have a warm sympathy. If everyone felt about war as Mr. Milne does, I am convinced that we should never have war; if everyone thought as he does, I do not know what would...

read more

The Christian in the Modern World

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 185-195

I do not propose to go into any details of what is called “Christian Sociology.” And a good deal of what I have to say will already have been said by others: I shall be satisfied if I can make one or two points as a contribution to a literature which is growing larger all the time. What position should the Christian take up in the modern state and the modern community? Every season a number of books appear on this subject: a week from today there will be published a book of 526 pages called “Christianity and the Social Revolution,” by several authors including the Regius Professor...

read more

Literature and the Modern World

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 196-204

People may be conscious of their age without knowing very much about it. I believe that most of us are influenced, more than we realize, by a kind of deterministic conception of history. That may be all right for the Marxian, who has a reasoned theory about it; but it has no advantage as an unconscious assumption. The assumption of the inevitability of progress has, we all know, been discarded in its nineteenth-century form: it is the butt of popular philosophers like Dean Inge.2 But actually, what we have discarded is a particular variety of the theory of progress: that which is...

read more

T. S. Eliot’s Notes on the Way [II]. To the Editor of Time and Tide

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-207

Sir, – I have to thank you yet a third time for giving Miss Rebecca West the hospitality of your columns.1 But this time I am not so thankful to Miss West, since she has said something to which I must reply. She says that my phrases “seek to suggest” that she has not read the works of Father Thurston. I never dreamt of such a thing: I only sought to suggest that perhaps Miss West had read them without quite understanding them.

I am inclined to believe that my suspicions have some foundation. Miss West says that I remark in dispraise of Mr. Huxley’s interest in...

read more

Mr. Milne and the War [II]. To the Editor of Time and Tide

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 208-209

Sir, – As Mr. Milne continues to involve himself, like a cat in fly-paper, in comparisons or analogies which he cannot control; as he is impervious to irony; and as he consistently misses the point, I shall content myself with re-stating briefly what I meant the main point to be.2

I did not criticise Mr. Milne’s book from pure love of destruction, but from a belief that essays like his are harmful in so far as they distract people’s minds from more practical effort to minimise the chances of war. I pointed out that, instead of inveighing against War in general, we should...

read more

Douglas in the Church Assembly. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 210-212

Sir, – While I feel, as I suppose do other readers of the New English Weekly, gratified that some members of the Commission appointed to report to the Church Assembly on the subject of Unemployment, were able to incorporate into the Recommendations such excellent and far-reaching suggestions; and while I am gratified also that the Assembly has “accepted” (whatever that means) the Report, I cannot feel any happier after reading the report of the discussions of the Report in the Assembly.1 So far as the Church Assembly, or its vocal members, may be taken to speak for “The Church,” it would appear that the Church has not made up its mind

read more

T. S. Eliot’s Notes on the Way [III]. To the Editor of Time and Tide

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 213

Sir, – Mr. Milne has begun to formulate the differences between him and myself. He believes that it is “simpler” to stop war than to stop conflicts between nations;1 I believe that there is more hope of preventing the causes of conflict than of stopping war so long as the conflicts continue. That is one point; and Mr. Milne and I hold contradictory views. Second, Mr. Milne and I dislike war for different reasons: I adopt an explicitly...

read more

The Church Assembly and Social Credit. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 214-215

Sir, – I hope and believe that the difference between myself and Mr. Maurice Reckitt is more verbal than real. I assumed, even if I did not make explicit, the difference between the Report of the Commission and the debate on the Report in the Assembly.1 I was not finding fault with the Report, but with the debate.2 When I wrote, my feelings were inflamed by the words of Lord Hugh Cecil, Mr. Assheton, Sir Francis Fremantle, and the Bishop of Jarrow.3

I should like to draw a distinction between the use of the terms “the Church” and “Churchmen.” I indicated a point beyond which I thought...

read more

The Church and Society. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 216-217

Sir, – In replying to Fr. Demant’s letter in your issue of March 7th, I have had still more difficulty than in replying to Mr. Reckitt, to decide what the points of difference are.1

I did not speak of the obligation of the Church to “pass beyond” saying that the state of things is bad, to saying why it is bad, because I assumed that the Church should know why it is bad before saying that it is bad. But Why may mean several different answers: here, I suppose, we mean the reason why the state of things controverts Christian faith and practice. The answer...

read more

Religion and Literature

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 218-229

What I have to say is largely in support of the following propositions: Literary criticism should be completed by criticism from a definite ethical and theological standpoint. In so far as in any age there is common agreement on ethical and theological matters, so far can literary criticism be substantive. In ages like our own, in which there is no such common agreement, it is the more necessary for Christian readers to scrutinize their reading, especially of works of imagination, with explicit ethical and theological standards. The “greatness” of literature cannot be determined solely...

read more

Introduction to Selected Poems, by Marianne Moore

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 230-237

We know very little about the value of the work of our contemporaries, almost as little as we know about our own. It may have merits which exist only for contemporary sensibility; it may have concealed virtues which will only become apparent with time. How it will rank when we are all dead authors ourselves we cannot say with any precision. If one is to talk about one’s contemporaries at all, therefore, it is important to make up our minds as to what we can affirm with confidence, and as to what must be a matter of doubting conjecture. The last thing, certainly, that we are likely to know...

read more

A Commentary (Apr 1935)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 238-244

The usual form in which Communism is made attractive to us is that of economic necessity. We agree that the present economic system is not very satisfactory, and that it works in such a way as frequently to offend our feelings of humanity and our notions of justice; we are aware that it frequently rewards excessively a type of person which, at best, is hardly that which we most admire. We may also agree that it works less and less efficiently, and that some drastic alteration will be necessary if life is to be made even tolerable. When any revolutionary change of system is proposed, we have to...

read more

Autobiographical Note. Harvard College Class of 1910: Seventh Report

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 245-248

After graduation I spent a year in Paris, attending lectures mostly on philosophy, and then three years in the Harvard Graduate School working for a Ph.D. in philosophy, and also studying Sanskrit and Pali. I was given a Sheldon Fellowship for a year, which I spent at Oxford working at Aristotle under Harold Joachim. At the end of the year I married, and took a job as a master at High Wycombe Grammar School at £140 p.a. with dinner. I never returned to take my final examinations for the Ph.D. but perhaps the dissertation on “Meinong’s Gegendstandstheorie considered in Relation to Bradley’s Theory of Knowledge” is still preserved in some archive...

read more

Views and Reviews [I]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 249-253

I propose to use the occasional liberty of this page, which the Editor has allowed me, for random comments on my current reading, whether of new books or old ones.1 If I sometimes commit the error of discussing a book reviewed elsewhere in the paper, I shall excuse myself in advance, on the ground that comment of this kind differs from reviewing proper – in that the book itself is primarily a point of departure for the commentator’s reflexions. It may be treated irrelevantly and irreverently, without the reviewer’s solemn responsibilities; and the reader of these comments may...

read more

Views and Reviews [II]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 254-257

While there are a number of persons living who can lay some claim to distinction as poets, there are not very many with an equal claim to distinction as masters of prose style. By prose I do not mean the imaginative prose of certain novelists, so much as the kind of prose which figures more largely in anthologies, the prose of historical narration and description, and of philosophical and scientific exposition and argument. There is more capacity than achievement. There is Mr. Herbert Read, whose In Retreat is in its kind one of the few prose masterpieces that our period will leave...

read more

A Commentary (July 1935)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 258-260

As the appearance of this number will almost coincide with the seventieth birthday of Mr. William Butler Yeats, the occasion appears suitable for a few retrospective observations upon Mr. Yeats’s contributions to English poetry in the past, as well as his importance in the present.1

This is not the place for a critical discussion of his work, which would require close analysis, but for an appreciation of his services and an expression of gratitude. The poets of the group in which Mr. Yeats, as a junior member, first appeared, had several virtues which were not so conspicuous...

read more

This England! To the Editor of The Church Times

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 261-262

Sir, – Canon Iddings Bell, in his article in your last issue, made several mistakes of approach.1 He made two generalizations not really necessary to his main point, and therefore distracting. There is as little use in saying that the English are complacent as there is in the equally common remark that the French have bad manners.2 If you live long enough in France, you cease to consider French manners bad; and if you live long enough in England, the assertion that the English are complacent ceases to have any meaning. Different nations have different manners and different...

read more

Should There Be a Censorship of Books?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 263-267

This is the title for my remarks which was assigned to me, and I do not cavil at it. If you make inquiries of the Home Office, concerning the publication of a book in which you are interested, you will be told that there is no censorship in this country. That is literally true. Our Censor is any private subject, or common informer, who can find a magistrate to agree with him; and his censorship is only exercised after a book has been printed and published.

I shall not attempt to touch the question of political censorship, but only the question of moral censorship. The two questions are often...

read more

Views and Reviews [III]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 268-271

Some remarks made not long ago by the Poet Laureate, in awarding a prize, have recurred to my mind in another context. I have not the newspaper report by me, but I think that his words were to this effect. When he was young, he said, he believed that the elder and established poets were either indifferent or hostile to the efforts of younger men, and he accordingly returned the appropriate feelings. Now that he is an elder poet himself, he knows that this is not true, and that older men wish only to encourage, advance and applaud the best work of their juniors. I believe this to have...

read more

A Commentary (Oct 1935)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 272-277

On the leader page of The Times newspaper for August 14th is a very interesting account of what is called a “lost” tribe, but might as well be called a “found” tribe, of Papuans of unknown Asiatic race, dwelling in a fertile valley protected, or hitherto protected, by high mountain ranges.1 This singular people, unlike any other hitherto discovered, failed to make any demonstrations of joy at the advent of Australian explorers, who unexpectedly found themselves in a situation more usual in Europe or North America, namely, “starving in the midst of plenty.” “By gestures the natives...

read more

Errata. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 278

Sir, – May I ask your permission to inform your readers that the author of Scotland: that Distressed Area is Mr. George Malcolm Thomson, not Mr. George Malcolm Thomas? I should also like to point...

read more

Pacifism. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 279-280

Sir, – It is an obvious principle of controversial writing that one should direct one’s attack at the enemy, and not shower blows indiscriminately upon bystanders, some of whom may be sympathisers. One should know whom one is attacking. One may have several enemies; but when these enemies are not allied, there is nothing to be gained by attacking them at once. I make these remarks with a view to the contribution to your last number by Mr. C. H. Norman.1 I read what he had to say with a good deal...

read more

Views and Reviews [IV]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 281-284

The art of the occasional or periodical commentary is one to which I have given some attention, and I know enough of its difficulties and failures to be, I think, some judge of its success. It is an art which, if practised at all, must be practised sedulously, regularly and often. The ideal commentator must be attentive to current events, with an amused attention to the faits divers,1 as well as to the headlines, and must be sensitive to the symbolic importance of the petty, as well as to the insignificance of the sensational. He should enjoy the bioscope of contemporary history as a spectacle...

read more

The Supernatural. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 285

Sir, – The sentences given in Mr. Norman’s letter which he says were omitted from his article as printed, do not seem to me to alter the situation in any way.2 I thought that I made it clear in my own letter that I was not taking exception to Mr. Norman’s views on the subject of the supernatural basis of religion, but merely pointing out that he was only injuring his own case by airing them in the wrong place. I wrote my letter because I have felt a good deal of sympathy with Mr. Norman’s political views, and it seemed...

read more

Stilton Cheese. To the Editor of The Times

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 286-287

Sir, – May I be allowed the pleasure of supporting Sir John Squire’s manly and spirited defense of Stilton cheese? At the same time I should like to add, before it is too late, a few reflections on the project of a statue.1

I do not suggest for a moment that the inventor of Stilton cheese is not worthy of a statue. I only criticize the proposal on the ground of the transitory character of the result. Certainly, all the business of public subscriptions, speeches, broadcasts, the wrangling over designs, the eventual unveiling with a military band, and the excellent photograph...

read more

Audiences, Producers, Plays, Poets

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 288-289

It becomes much more difficult to find anything worth saying about dramatic verse, once you begin trying to write it. And theoretically, we should leave theory about contemporary drama until we have produced some contemporary drama to theorise about.

We admit that we cannot expect to produce a new dramatic literature until we have the audiences and also the producers capable of helping the poets to write for the theatre. On the other hand the producers are checked until they have enough dramatic repertory with which to feed and train...

read more

Cheese. To the Editor of The New Statesman and Nation

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 290

Sir, – Mr. David Garnett (reviewing Mr. Osbert Burdett’s book) is in error in supposing that there is no tolerable American cheese.1 There is a delicious cheese of Port Salut type made by Trappist monks in Ontario.2 But Trappist monks, like their cheese, are the product of “a settled civilisation of long standing,” and I fear there is little demand for either.3 Americans seem to prefer a negative cream cheese which they can...

1936

read more

Lord Victor Seymour. To the Editor of The Church Times

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 291-292

Sir, – We should be grateful if you would allow us to make in your columns the following announcement for the benefit of friends and admirers of the late Rev. Lord Victor Seymour outside of his own parish of St. Stephen’s, Gloucester Road.1

The Parochial Church Council has decided on a memorial, which is to take two forms: an endowment fund and a screen before the Lady-chapel. The church, without an endowment, is in a precarious position, and may be more so in the future; and it is known that Lord Victor...

read more

A reply to Roland Burke Savage’s “Literature at the Irish Crossroads"

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-299

So far as I am qualified to comment at all upon the subject matter under discussion, I am in agreement with the speaker on his main point, that the next generation in Irish literature has a new and difficult task before it, and that it cannot take its direction or its interests from the men who have made Irish literature in the last forty years.1 Furthermore, there is a choice before the next generation, which is perhaps more difficult than that which any previous generation has been faced with, and which will demand the greatest effort of consciousness and conscience. And if one believes...

read more

Tradition and the Practice of Poetry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 300-310

The title I have given is misleading.1 What I shall really be concerned with is not primarily the relation of a literature to other literatures, but the relation of a literature to itself. What, in the practice of a particular art, such as poetry, do we mean by tradition; how does a local, national or linguistic tradition proceed? We must admit, to begin with, that the word “tradition” has a bad sense as well as possibly a good one. When we read, in a newspaper review or an obituary notice, that a poet has been “traditional in the best sense of the word,” we are usually correct in inferring that the poet in question has been traditional in the worst sense of the...

read more

A Commentary (Jan 1936)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 311-317

The Criterion has never undertaken, but has rather avoided the discussion of topical political issues, however extensive. There are enough other periodicals, of every shade of opinion, which exist primarily for such discussion: discussion which in any case can be more adequately conducted in journals appearing at more frequent intervals. If – what is often doubted – there remains any place for quarterly reviews in the modern world, their task is surely to concern themselves with political philosophy, rather than with politics, and with the examination of the fundamental ideas...

read more

An unsigned review of Totem: The Exploitation of Youth, by Harold Stovin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 318-319

This is a disappointing book. The title, the documentary method, and to some extent the writing, which is plain and good, suggest that Mr. Stovin is a disciple of the author of The Doom of Youth; but the latter part of the book shows that Mr. Stovin has little in common with Mr. Wyndham Lewis.2 The first part of the book, which is a documented account of the Boy Scouts, Toc H, the Oxford Groupers and such “movements,” contains valuable material and is horrid reading.3 But Mr. Stovin does not leave the facts to speak for themselves, or leave Lord Baden Powell...

read more

An unsigned review of Selected Shelburne Essays, by Paul Elmer More

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 320

This volume, No. 434 of “The World’s Classics,” comes to us from New York, but we hope that it is published in this country as well, since it is the first selection from the essays of the finest literary critic of his time. The Shelburne Essays, are so numerous that any selection so restricted as this, must appear to have something arbitrary about it.2† These at least are chosen by their author; and their variety is such that we may presume that he...

read more

Preface to Essays Ancient and Modern, by T. S. Eliot

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 321-322

A volume of essays entitled For Lancelot Andrewes has gone out of print, after some eight years, and a new edition was proposed. I have taken the opportunity of changing the title, which had served its turn, of omitting the preface, which had more than served its turn,1 and of omitting two papers with which I was dissatisfied, on Machiavelli and on Crashaw.2 And as the essay on Thomas Middleton is now included in another collection called Elizabethan Essays,3 there was no point in including that either. On the other hand I have added five essays not previously collected: “Religion...

read more

In Memoriam

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 323-336

Tennyson is a great poet, for reasons that are perfectly clear.2 He has three qualities which are seldom found together except in the greatest poets: abundance, variety, and complete competence. We therefore cannot appreciate his work unless we read a good deal of it. We may not admire his aims: but whatever he sets out to do, he succeeds in doing, with a mastery which gives us the sense of confidence that is one of the major pleasures of poetry. His variety of metrical accomplishment is astonishing. Without making the mistake of trying to write Latin verse in English...

read more

Modern Education and the Classics

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 337-345

Questions of education are frequently discussed as if they bore no relation to the social system in which and for which the education is carried on. This is one of the commonest reasons for the unsatisfactoriness of the answers. It is only within a particular social system that a system of education has any meaning. If education today seems to deteriorate, if it seems to become more and more chaotic and meaningless, it is primarily because we have no settled and satisfactory arrangement of society, and because we have both vague and diverse opinions about the kind of society...

read more

Christian Sociology. A review of Preface to a Christian Sociology, by Cyril E. Hudson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 346-348

Canon Hudson has called this book quite rightly a preface to Christian sociology. He has kept within the limitations of the title, and the book should serve his purpose admirably. It is comprehensive without being vague, and clear without being cut and dried, and may be offered as a primer to all Churchpeople who feel any stirring of social conscience. It not only provides a brief bibliography of further reading, but touches upon the main problems in such a way as to provoke further thought on the part...

read more

Saving the Future: Mission of the Save the Children Fund: Practical Service at Home and Abroad

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 349-354

Different kinds of charity will appeal to different temperaments. It may not be impertinent to explain why the Save the Children Fund appeals to mine, and why I think it should appeal to a variety of persons.2 Most charities are either for domestic or for foreign purposes; and those which exist for work abroad are always likely to suffer from the prejudice that charity begins at home and that there are too many good causes near at hand in urgent need of help, and that every country should look after its own needs. But the charity that both begins and ends at home is an imperfect expression...

read more

The Church as Action: Note on a Recent Correspondence

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 355-357

I should like to rectify a small error, for the existence of which I cannot wholly disclaim responsibility. In a recent letter in your columns, Mr. Desmond Hawkins said: “If, as Mr. T. S. Eliot’s Lambeth essay suggests, the Church has decided to go to earth during a new Dark Age ...” Mr. Barlow, writing a week later, does not mention my name, but he says, apparently following Mr. Hawkins: “If in fact the Church has gone into hiding against the advent of a new dark age ...”1 While I was glad to see Mr. Barlow using lower case, instead of Mr. Hawkins’s capitals, I am still apprehensive, because...

read more

A Commentary (Apr 1936)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 358-364

I have been reading a book which, if I remember rightly, met with a good deal of critical approval when it was reviewed in London – it is an American book – some months ago: Was Europe a Success? by Joseph Wood Krutch, published by Methuens at 3s. 6d., with the approval on the front flap of Albert Einstein and Aldous Huxley.1 Mr. Krutch is a thoughtful littérateur of considerable ability and power of persuasion; he is described by his publishers as a “liberal intellectual”; and he objects, in the name of reason and liberalism, to both fascism and communism. His objections are the substance of his book; and anyone who also objects to fascism and communism...

read more

The Church as Action [II]. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 365-366

Sir, – I should be better contented with Mr. Barlow’s letter in your issue of April 2, if it had been written before instead of after mine; for I fear that by telling him what not to think, I have led him to think it. I do sympathize with Mr. Barlow’s complaint; and I am not undertaking to defend contemporary ecclesiastics.1 But even if all his objections are valid, they are still quite irrelevant to one’s decision to become a member of the Church or stay outside. This decision, on the other hand, does have a bearing on one’s criticism of the Church....

read more

The Church as Action [III]. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 367-368

Sir, – Mr. Desmond Hawkins’s admirable letter in your issue of April 9th leaves me in some doubt as to what the subject of controversy is.1 I had assumed (though this was not the point on which my contribution turned) that Mr. Hawkins and Mr. Barlow, like some other critics, complained of the lack of interest of churchmen in social affairs. But I am wholly in agreement with Mr. Hawkins in his objection to “those who frankly use their ordainment as an instrument solely for social welfare and humanistic activities” [523]. That the clergy, both high and low, should take an active...

read more

G. K. Chesterton

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 369-370

I never met Gilbert Chesterton, and my acquaintance with him was limited to a little formal correspondence on one or two occasions, either about a contribution I wanted from him or about some book I sent him;1 but his disappearance, from a world such as that we live in, is one of those which give even to us who did not know the man, a sense of personal loss and isolation.

The notices that I have seen in the general Press seem to me to have exaggerated Chesterton’s achievements in some obvious respects, and to have ignored his achievements in much more important ones. His poetry...

read more

Milton I

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 371-379

While it must be admitted that Milton is a very great poet indeed, it is something of a puzzle to decide in what his greatness consists. On analysis, the marks against him appear both more numerous and more significant than the marks to his credit. As a man, he is antipathetic. Either from the moralist’s point of view, or from the theologian’s point of view, or from the psychologist’s point of view, or from that of the political philosopher, or judging by the ordinary standards of likeableness in human beings, Milton is unsatisfactory. The doubts which I have to express about him are more...

read more

A Commentary (July 1936)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 380-385

There would seem to be no subject today on which more words can more easily be expended to less purpose, than that of the ethics of War and Peace. Waves of discussion rise and fall in the correspondence columns. Neither the musterings of Canon Sheppard, nor the downright knotcutting of the Bishop of Durham, nor Mr. Aldous Huxley’s quotations of Lactantius and Tertullian, get us any forwarder.1 With all respect to Bishop Southwell, we cannot feel sure that the XXXVIIth Article of Religion is the perfect salve for Christian consciences; nor does the Bishop of Durham’s...

read more

The Year’s Poetry

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 386

The Editor Writes:

Mr. John Lehmann, one of the three editors of The Year’s Poetry (The Bodley Head) has written to point out a misleading comment made by Miss Janet Adam Smith in the April number of The Criterion.

Unfortunately the letter has been mislaid, and at the moment of going to press we have been unable to get in touch with Mr. Lehmann.1 His objection, however, was to the following criticism of The Year’s Poetry made by Miss Adam Smith: “the inclusion of a chorus...

read more

Mr. Murry’s Shakespeare. A review of Shakespeare, by John Middleton Murry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 387-391

Mr. Murry has written a book about Shakespeare which, for several reasons, is a very good book indeed. It was evidently a book that Mr. Murry wanted to write: one cannot read it without becoming convinced that he has worked on the subject for a long time, and has made himself perfectly familiar with the plays and poems of Shakespeare. It conveys an impression throughout of an easy command of the material; and Mr. Murry appears to have acquainted himself with Shakespeare literature so diligently and soberly that he neither parades his predecessors superfluously...

read more

Dr. Charles Harris. To the Editor of The Times

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 392-393

Mr. T. S. Eliot writes: – Having been away for a week in the country and inattentive to newspapers, I have only just learned of the death of Dr. Charles Harris.1 Possibly you would care to print the following paragraph by one who was associated with Dr. Harris for several years past in the schemes that he had most at heart:

The death of Charles Harris removes the most powerful force in the publication of theological literature in the Church of England. I say “publication,” because in spite of his considerable learning, his wide...

read more

A Commentary (Oct 1936)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 394-400

One would prefer to deal with questions that are soluble, and discuss subjects on which understanding is possible. But one is impelled, by the receipt of manifestoes to be signed by “artists and writers,” as well as by scientists and other intellectual workers, to pursue reflexion on the subject of peace and war. I have at the moment some matter from the “International Peace Campaign,” also a round robin or snowball letter of a semi-anonymous nature, and a pamphlet by Lord Allen of Hurtwood, entitled Peace in Our Time.1 There is also, of course, Canon Sheppard’s movement, which...

read more

The Need for Poetic Drama

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 401-406

I am very glad to have the opportunity of talking to you about verse drama, because it is a subject that very few people ever stop to think about; and I suspect that most people regard plays in verse as a necessary evil, like examinations. People think of them as something of a strain on the mind even when not actually boring, and they had rather be excused from going to see them. I believe, on the other hand, that poetry is the natural and complete medium for drama; that the prose play is a kind of abstraction capable of giving you only a part of what the theatre can give; and that the verse play...

1937

read more

The Week’s “Good Cause” Appeal: “The North Kensington Community Centre"

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 407-409

In a remote corner of North Kensington near the line of the Great Western Railway, over against Kensal Green, there are living, in several blocks of Housing Trust Flats, some two thousand adults and three thousand children. Most of you never heard of this district, until you read of the visit of the Duchess of Kent a few days ago, an area you can walk round in ten minutes.2 These are people of good London breed.3 Before they were moved to these flats, they were living in Kensington in overcrowded decaying houses – many of them in damp sunless basements. Very few realise what...

read more

A Commentary (Jan 1937)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 410-417

Those who would like to believe in the progress of political institutions can take no honest satisfaction either in events in Spain or in the opinions and sympathies which these events have tended to arouse in this country.1 What has to be remarked is rather a deterioration of political thinking, with a pressure on everyone, which has to be stubbornly resisted, to accept one extreme philosophy or another. The situation at the moment of writing is not yet quite that of two great groups of nations, aligned against each other with a fanaticism (complicated with self-interest) that no previous...

read more

Paul Elmer More

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 418-423

The place of Paul More’s writings in my own life has been of such a kind that I find easiest, and perhaps most effective, to treat it in a kind of autobiographical way. What is significant to me – and it is of objective significance as well – is not simply the conclusion at which he arrived, but the fact that he arrived there from somewhere else; and not simply that he came from somewhere else, but that he took a particular route. And conversely, the point at which he has arrived gives an importance to the stages of the journey which was not apparent before. If I find an analogy with my...

read more

The Church’s Message to the World

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 424-429

That there is an antithesis between the Church and the World is a belief we derive from the highest authority. We know also from our reading of history, that a certain tension between Church and State is desirable. When Church and State fall out completely, it is ill with the commonwealth; and when Church and State get on too well together, there is something wrong with the Church. But the distinction between the Church and the World is not so easy to draw as that between Church and State. Here we mean not any one communion or ecclesiastical organisation but the whole number...

read more

Byron

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 430-448

The facts of a large part of Byron’s life have been well set forth, in the last few years, by Sir Harold Nicolson2† and Mr. Quennell, who have also provided interpretations which accord with each other and which make the character of Byron more intelligible to the present generation.3 No such interpretation has yet been offered in our time for Byron’s verse. In and out of universities, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley and Keats have been discussed from various points of view: Byron and Scott have been left in peace. Yet Byron, at least, would seem the most nearly remote4† from the...

read more

Mr. Reckitt, Mr. Tomlin, and the Crisis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 449-456

In complying, somewhat unwillingly, with the Editor’s request that I should contribute to this discussion, I should like to begin by being no less complimentary to Mr. Reckitt and Mr. Tomlin than they have been to each other.1 I think too highly of their abilities, and of the value of their opinions, to hope that I can compose their differences. But when two opposed views have been put forward, there is something to be said for attempting to express another which is not quite identical with either.

I can speak, at least, as one who, from what may be either a judicial or a vacillating temper of mind, failed...

read more

Introduction to Nightwood, by Djuna Barnes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 457-462

When the question is raised, of writing an introduction to a book of a creative order, I always feel that the few books worth introducing are exactly those which it is an impertinence to introduce. I have already committed two such impertinences;3 this is the third, and if it is not the last no one will be more surprised than myself. I can justify this preface only in the following way. One is liable to expect other people to see, on their first reading of a book, all that one has come to perceive in the course of a developing intimacy with it. I have read Nightwood a number of times, in manuscript, in...

read more

The Revenger’s Tragedy: A Note by T. S. Eliot

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 463-465

There was a rumour, started by Marcel Schwob, and, I regret to say, given currency by Professor Allardyce Nicoll, to the effect that Cyril Tourneur naquit de l’union d’un dieu inconnu avec une prostituée.2 If, however, we assume that Cyril Tourneur existed, and if he was the author of both of the two plays ascribed to him – and in the seventeenth century poets sometimes did have poetical names, e.g., Aurelian Townshend – then nothing better has been written about Tourneur than Churton Collins’s Introduction to his edition of the plays and poems.3 But I think that what we should do...

read more

A Commentary (Apr 1937)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 466-471

What most strikes me, in reading the selection of Political and Economic Writings (Nott: 5s. net) of A. R. Orage, is the liveliness and interest of the passages from The New Age dated August, 1912.1 The bulk of the book consists of selections from his editorial contributions to The New English Weekly from 1932 to 1934, and will serve as a useful refresher, and convenient reference. But it deals with issues which are as actual now as they were from five to three years ago, and we re-read it without any feeling of surprise. What does come with a shock of contemporaneity is Orage’s...

read more

Introduction to Revelation, eds. John Baillie and Hugh Martin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 472-496

What I have to write is not an introduction to the essays in this book, but an introduction to the subject; and it is because I am not a theologian that I have been asked to contribute. I am not to concern myself with the different forms in which men may hold a doctrine of revelation, or with the consequences they may deduce from it; either with the different theological systems, nor with the different Christian communions. I am concerned with the general differences between those who maintain a doctrine of revelation and those who reject all revelation. I am assumed to have an intimate and affectionate...

read more

The Church as an Ecumenical Society

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 497-503

I have been asked to speak on “The Church as an Ecumenical Society,” with special reference to the admirable mise au point by Dr. Visser ’t Hooft in pp. 88-95 of the book “The Church” by himself and Dr. Oldham.1 In speaking to this question, one might equally well be speaking with concern for “Faith and Order” and for “Life and Work.”2 What I have to say bears upon the relation of these two fields of exploration. What is the relation of “Faith and Order” to “Life and Work”? What is the relation of union to...

read more

A Commentary (July 1937)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 504-509

The death of Paul Elmer More passed almost unnoticed in this country, where his writings have never been widely known.1 Yet he was one of two Americans of his generation, more distinguished and important critics than any who survive them in that country, and than any of their own time in England. That More and Irving Babbitt, the most cosmopolitan American writers of their period (Babbitt was French, More was English in his sympathies), should be so little known outside of their own country is curious: and their lives have some bearing on the question of the relation...

read more

Report of a Speech Day Address at the Kingswood School

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 510-513

In welcoming Mr. Eliot, the Headmaster spoke of the eagerness, perhaps a trifle indiscreet, with which the upper part of the school looked forward to his coming. Many people owed a lot to Mr. Eliot for “his refusal to divorce poetry from religion,” and for his efforts to link again poetry and the stage. [...]2

The reception which greeted Mr. Eliot was eloquent of “the uncommon, if rather indiscreet eagerness” referred to by the Headmaster. Remembering his own Speech Days, he felt sure that then, as now, boys had far more...

read more

The Oxford Conference [I]. To the Editor of The Church Times

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 514-516

Sir, – May I be permitted, as a delegate to the recent Conference on Church, Community and State, to offer a brief postscript to your leading article of last week?2 I do not wish to make any extended criticism until the printed reports of the sections are available and until the reports of the Conference on Faith and Order are available.3 But at the moment the following two points seem to be pertinent.

1. Was the Conference “representative”? That depends on what one thinks ought to be represented. Of the full delegates, the number of whom...

read more

The Oxford Conference [II]. To the Editor of The Church Times

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 517-518

Sir, – Having been away in a rather remote part of the country, I have only just seen your issue of August 6, and apologize for the following comment being a week overdue.

In your first leading article you say, “Mr. Eliot points out that the Life and Work Conference was dominated by American Protestants.”2 This is not quite what I was trying to convey. I said that there were too many Americans (indeed I think that there were too many delegates altogether), but this is not the same thing. So far as I was aware, the few Americans who...

read more

Religious Drama: Mediaeval and Modern

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 519-530

When we speak of “religious plays,” we inevitably have in mind Everyman, and the various cycles of plays, such as those of York, Beverley, Wakefield, Coventry and Chester,2 which flourished in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries and lingered on through the time of the Tudors. These plays give us a kind of standard by which we measure anything that we write and produce now – however far we depart from the aims and methods of the older drama. The qualification is important. For this standard of the mediaeval plays may be applied in an undesirable way. We are apt to think of...

read more

The Development of Shakespeare’s Verse. Two Lectures

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 531-561

Anyone who ventures to talk about Shakespeare to a University audience may feel called upon – not to present his credentials, for if they exist, they are already known – but to excuse his speaking without them. The credentials I have in mind are those of scholarship, which I do not pretend to possess; the excuse I have in mind is the example of a writer who has put us in his debt by his contributions to the understanding of Shakespeare from the point of view of a practical dramatic producer. Sir Harley Granville-Barker, by producing Shakespeare plays, and bringing to the study of Shakespeare a knowledge of the permanent conditions of...

read more

A Commentary (Oct 1937)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 562-567

I have lately been considering a manifesto which reached me some time ago, but to which at the time I did not give sufficient attention. It is the prefatory statement to a catalogue of the 1937 Exhibition of the “Unity of Artists for Peace, Democracy and Cultural Development.”1

For Peace, for Democracy, for Cultural Progress.2 “To many people,” the preface explains, “that banner will seem irrelevant or unnecessary. All sane people, they may say, are for peace; all liberal-minded men are in favour of democracy; and certainly everyone who takes an interest in the Arts must...

read more

An Anglican Platonist: The Conversion of Elmer More. An unsigned review of Pages from an Oxford Diary, by Paul Elmer More

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 568-572

This little posthumous book is not quite what it at first appears to be. A rapid glance would give the impression that it was a series of religious meditations or pensées by a devout layman; but it is not quite that; and in these matters the “not quite” marks a difference of kind. To appreciate the nature of this book one needs to know something of the life of Paul Elmer More and of his works. Readers who have this acquaintance should possess themselves also of this book, which is the nearest approach to a personal confession that could be expected from so reserved a man as More. Others should...

read more

A retrospective review of The Lion and the Fox: The Rôle of the Hero in the Plays of Shakespeare, by Wyndham Lewis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 573-578

The Lion and the Fox is a book which, like some other of Mr. Lewis’s works, deals with several subjects; and the fact that it is concerned nominally (or sub-nominally) with Shakespeare should not lead us to suppose that his purposes here can be understood wholly without reference to other writings – chiefly, of course, The Art of Being Ruled, and also Time and Western Man.2 Even, however, as “another book about Shakespeare,” the book says the best things that have been said about certain plays. Mr. Lewis points out that Shakespeare criticism, during the later nineteenth century and up to...

1938

read more

A Note on Two Odes of Cowley

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 579-588

The meaning of the term “metaphysical poetry” is stretched to its utmost to include Cowley; and in considering Cowley as a metaphysical poet, our interest in that subject is stretched to its utmost too. It is quite right that specimens by Cowley should be included in a volume of selections from the metaphysical poets; but if we were making a selection from Cowley we might be justified in omitting all of those poems which show direct indebtedness to Donne. Cowley’s relation to Donne, in The Mistress (e.g. “My Diet”),2 is that of an imitator; unlike Cleveland or Benlowes, he has no...

read more

A Commentary (Jan 1938)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 589-596

The presentation of a large sum of money to a University, to whatever purposes the gift is limited, is always the cause of jubilation by University authorities and of respectful admiration by the press. A few persons may wonder, from time to time, whether either the donors or the recipients are fully aware of what they are doing, or of the possible consequences in the long run. The recent benefactions of Lord Nuffield to Oxford afford a number of reasons for speculation of this quiet kind:1 our chief difficulty is that the possible consequences extend in more than one direction, and...

read more

Report of an address at Southwark Cathedral

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 597-598

Mr. T. S. Eliot, representing the literary associations of the Cathedral, said that Southwark Cathedral had something that even the Wren churches in the City could not give. It had a more venerable antiquity, a greater authority, and more numerous august associations. It was not mere piety that drove City workers into City churches and, sometimes, into Southwark Cathedral, at luncheon hours, but the physical peace gained in that way did something to pave the way to another peace, and it was to those people who had learned to know the City churches that those buildings meant...

read more

To the Editor of Blackfriars

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 599-600

AMENDES HONORABLES.1 Mr. T. S. Eliot has kindly written to us drawing attention to a grave misunderstanding which may arise from our all too brief reference to his important observations in the current Criterion:2

In your admirable “Extracts and Comments,” which I invariably read with profit, I am a little nettled to find, in the current number, a brief reference to my having commented “charitably” on Lord Nuffield’s benefactions to Oxford. While I hope that my comments always show Christian charity ... I take a mild exception – not to the brevity of the reference...

read more

To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 601

Sir, – Having in mind the attention which you have recently given to the relations of Agriculture and Industry, I was struck by a note in The Evening News of March 7. Mr. Robert Holland-Martin, Chairman of the Southern Railway, had been addressing members of the British Railway Stockholders’ Union at a lunch. He observed that his railway’s electrification policy had proved a “gold mine”; and added that the company was “fortunate in having and, possibly, in making (italics mine) a very large development of suburban London south of the Thames.”2 It would seem, therefore that...

read more

On a Recent Piece of Criticism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 602-608

It is often said that the standards of literary criticism are lower than they used to be. I think that criticism, like poetry, is healthier at the top than it was a generation ago, but that there is a wider gap between the best and the second-best. If the standards of the best are higher, those of the second-best – week-to-week journalism – have sunk. Whispers often circulate about the lack of disinterestedness on the part of reviewers, about cabals and private motives, about the pliancy of periodicals in the interest of advertising revenue, and so on. Such scandals, if and when they are justified, are serious...

read more

A Commentary (Apr 1938)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 609-616

Anyone who has questioned the benefits to be obtained from the Nuffield Endowments of Oxford, or the National Theatre, should be at least sceptical of the Music and Drama Bill, a measure (as The Times newspaper of the 10th February informs us) prepared by the League of Audiences, an organization from which in the past I have received leaflets which I fear I have treated with inadequate attention.1 I have reason to hope that others, beyond those mentioned in the previous sentence, will have their doubts: for the Editor of The Church Times, whose mind is easy about the Nuffield Endowments,2 devotes...

read more

Report of a lecture on George Herbert

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 617-622

“I have been reading the poetry of Herbert’s period, over a long enough span of years to be able to observe a considerable development in my own appreciation and judgment.1 It is not only greater familiarity, but, I hope, greater maturity of mind and sensibility – for sensibility as well as intelligence should mature – which has brought me, to concede to Herbert as a religious poet a pre-eminence among his contemporaries and followers. I am, therefore, at the stage of asking for a revision of his reputation; feeling, as I do, that he has been not so much critically as implicitly...

read more

On Christianity and a Useful Life. A Speech Day address, Truro School, Cornwall

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 623-629

The thought that comes to my mind is this: “Don’t believe anything you’re told”; to which I might add: “Don’t be in a hurry to make up your mind.”

We all think we observe the first of these rules – that makes us all the more gullible. We are all inclined to disagree with the advice which our elders give us: that is a healthy enough impulse, but it springs from dislike of authority, rather than from seeing that our elders are wrong – though they frequently are wrong. Sometimes our disagreement springs from a deep source, and we must obey it, though we cannot explain it; but even then, to...

read more

How to Read Poetry. A Prize Day address, West Cornwall School for Girls, Penzance

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 630-635

You may know that I have been talking at Truro this morning: for which reason I wish to remark first that I am now going to talk about something quite different. That is not because I draw any distinction of subject matter or of manner, in addressing a different audience. It is simply that both occasions seem to me too important, to say the same thing twice − and on such an occasion, a talk may go sour quicker than milk on a hot day. So this afternoon I propose to talk about the one subject which I am generally supposed to know something about: I want to say something about “how to...

read more

Memorandum for the Archbishops’ Commission on Training for the Ministry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 636-639

As I do not feel qualified to hazard proposals within the terms of reference in the narrower sense, I feel that the most useful remarks that I can offer must be concerned with problems which may appear peripheral, but which are, I believe, fundamental. If the following is a contribution at all, it contributes rather to lighting the background against which discussions are conducted.

It is obvious that the Training of the Ministry is not a simple champ clos of specialised education.1 The training of the ministry is a problem of quite another order than the training of engineers, chemists and other...

read more

A Commentary (July 1938)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 640-645

A column in The Times brought to my notice a Report on the British Press published by P.E.P. (Political and Economic Planning) and sold at the price of half a guinea.1 Attracted by the cheerful American-sounding title of this organization, and wondering who would pay half a guinea for a report on the British Press, I bought a copy in order to find out. I learnt that P E P (it is printed without the stops) is “an independent, voluntary, non-party group and is not run for profit”: it is agreeable to hear of a group that is not run for profit. P E P consists of “more than a hundred working...

read more

Professor H. H. Joachim. To the Editor of The Times

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 646-647

Mr. T. S. Eliot writes: I trust it will not be amiss for an old pupil to add a postscript to your obituary notice of the late Professor Joachim.1 To him I owe not only whatever knowledge of the philosophy of Aristotle I may have once possessed but also whatever command of prose style I may still possess. There are other teachers also to whom I owe a debt of gratitude for stimulation of thought and curiosity, and for direction of studies: to Joachim alone am I aware of any debt for instruction in the writing of English. All readers of The Nature of Truth will acknowledge the...

read more

A Commentary (Oct 1938)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 648-652

In the last issue of The Criterion we gave first place among the reviews to a notice by Mr. Middleton Murry of Señor Mendizábal’s book on the Spanish War, Aux Origines d’une tragédie, with its long and important introduction by Jacques Maritain.1 In the August issue of Blackfriars I find an interesting note to which I refer for two reasons: first, because the incident does not appear to have received much notice elsewhere in this country, and second, because those who have approved the independent and courageous position of Maritain should have the opportunity of affirming their...

read more

The Future of Poetic Drama

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 653-658

I should consider it an impertinence to endeavour to instruct such an audience as this on the nature of poetic drama in general; or to discuss what can be done better, and what can not be done so well, in verse drama compared with prose. Nor do I wish to talk about the future of verse drama in all languages. With any of these arts, the material of which is words, its future depends upon the situation of a particular language at a particular time, and, I may add, in a particular place. Therefore I shall limit myself, in the time at my disposal, to the future of poetic drama in English, and in...

1939

read more

Last Words

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 659-665

With this number I terminate my editorship of The Criterion. I have been considering this decision for about two years: but I did not wish to come to a conclusion precipitately, because I knew that my retirement would bring The Criterion to an end. During the autumn, however, the prospect of war had involved me in hurried plans for suspending publication; and in the subsequent détente I became convinced that my enthusiasm for continuing the editorial work did not exist.1

Sixteen years is a long time for one man to remain editor of a review; for this review, I have sometimes wondered...

read more

Liberal Manifesto. To the Editor of The Church Times

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 666-667

Sir, – Your leading article of last week may evoke replies from those better qualified to speak than myself; in any event, I wish it to be understood that I write only for myself and without consultation with any other signatories.1

I gather from your article that the impression left upon your mind was of excellent intentions expressed in a slipshod way. I myself deprecate the continued use of the term “Liberal Catholic,” unless the Liberalism is understood to consist in an attitude to ecclesiastical polity, and not to...

read more

A Commentary: That Poetry Is Made with Words.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 668-671

The two most dangerous subjects of study for the poet – I think, the only subjects that are always dangerous for him – are aesthetics and psychology. Whether a poet can afford to interest himself in other abstract and philosophical studies is an individual matter: there are conspicuous instances of the good use of such aliment. But abstract studies which turn upon the practice of his own art are a very different matter. The danger of aesthetics is that it may make us conscious of what operates better unconsciously. The danger of psychology is the same; and has particular seriousness when...

read more

A Commentary: On Reading Official Reports

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 672-675

One of the most interesting, and in a way one of the most profitable forms of reading supplied by the printing presses today is the Report of any Official Commission. Such a Report is the result of periodical meetings, over a space of years, of a number of very busy people, some of whom are probably members of other commissions considering quite different subjects. They take the testimony of numerous selected witnesses, read and circulate amongst themselves innumerable interim reports, obtain a mass of documentation and evidence; and by some miracle, information...

read more

Correspondence: “That Poetry Is Made with Words"

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 676

Mr. Eliot writes:

My objection to the study of aesthetics by artists was empirical. Mr. Tomlin’s rejoinder is based upon an aesthetic theory: namely, that the reader of a poem shares the activity of the poet.1 This may be a tenable aesthetic theory, but I do not see that the holding of it enables the reader to enjoy or appreciate the poem any better. Mr. Tomlin says that...

read more

Truth and Propaganda. To the Editor of The New English Weekly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 677-678

Sir, – It is surely a mistake to suppose that a nation enters into war knowing quite clearly what it is fighting for. When a nation is the victim of aggression, it enters into war because it cannot help itself; when it is a nation that has pledged itself to help such a victim, it enters into war to fulfil its obligations. As for the aggressors in the present conflict, we may doubt whether the leaders know what, in the long run, they may expect to gain: their people have been instructed to consider itself the victim of injustice.

The clear formulation of our own aims cannot be arrived at without a deal of hard thinking by our best...

read more

A Commentary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 679-682

Demant’s The Religious Prospect has already been reviewed in these columns, and what I have to say will therefore not attempt to fulfil the requirements of a review.1 There is every justification for referring again and again to a book of such capital importance that it has inevitably escaped the notice, as it must inevitably outrun the understanding, of reviewers in the more conspicuous places. This is, furthermore, a kind of book which will provoke different trains of useful thought in various minds, or in the same minds at different moments: so it is desirable that everyone who...

read more

The Idea of a Christian Society

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 683-747

The three lectures which, with some revision and division, are here printed, were delivered in March 1939 at the invitation of the Master and Fellows of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, on the Boutwood Foundation.1 I wish to express my thanks to the Master and Fellows for this honour and privilege. The notes I have added while preparing the lectures for press.

My point of departure has been the suspicion that the current terms in which we discuss international affairs and political theory may only tend to conceal from us the real issues of contemporary civilisation. As I have...

read more

A Lay Theologian. A review of The Descent of the Dove: A Short History of the Holy Spirit in the Church, by Charles Williams

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 748-752

This book is not quite what you might expect it to be; but nothing by Mr. Charles Williams – nothing, at least, that he has written because he wanted to – ever is; and the sort of people who would object that Proteus does not observe the rules of all-in wrestling, the very literal-minded, may sometimes complain of Mr. Williams that he is playing a game of his own.2 The easiest way to try to prove a foul is to accuse Mr. Williams of heresy. To those who believe that orthodoxy is for the Church to determine, not for the individual writer to expect to arrive at until his views have been...

read more

A Sub-Pagan Society?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 753-756

Mr. Maurice Reckitt, in his kindly review of my book in the last issue, raises a point which is of considerable interest in itself.1 That the point is raised does not surprise me; but I am a little surprised by the criticism coming from this quarter – coming from which I am compelled to give it the most careful consideration. Nevertheless, I do not write as one having the slightest ground of complaint, but in gratitude to a reviewer who has done what is rare: raised a point which is relevant but which greatly transcends in importance the book itself....

Part II: Signed Letters and Documents with Multiple Authorship

read more

The Money System. To the Editor of The Times (5 Apr 1934)

Lascelles Abercrombie, Bonamy Dobrée, T. S. Eliot, Aldous Huxley, Hewlett Johnson, Edwin Muir, Hamish Miles, Herbert Read, and I. A. Richards

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 759-760

Sir, – In view of the publication of the letter of Sir Geoffrey Clarke and others in your issue of to-day, we beg to submit without further delay the following statement which we have had in preparation independently.1

In consideration of the continued difficulty experienced by all countries, whatever their political system, in adjusting consumption to production, the undersigned believe that it would be of value to have a thorough and public examination of some scheme of national credit.2 It would appear that the possibilities of production throughout...

read more

The Monetary System. To the Editor of The Times (10 May 1934)

Lascelles Abercrombie, Bonamy Dobrée, T. S. Eliot, Aldous Huxley, Hewlett Johnson, Hamish Miles, Edwin Muir, Herbert Read, I. A. Richards.

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 761

In view of the great number of inquiries we have received consequent upon the letter from ourselves which you were good enough to print in your columns on April 5,1 and the impossibility of dealing with them individually, may we further trespass on the hospitality of your pages...

read more

Authors and the Law of Libel: Plea for Reform. To the Editor of The Times (13 Mar 1936)

Richard Aldington; Michael Arlen; Maurice Baring; Phyllis Bentley; Edmund Blunden; Vera Brittain; John Drinkwater; T. S. Eliot; David Garnett; Philip Gibbs; Philip Guedalla; A. P. Herbert; Aldous Huxley; Storm Jameson; Sheila Kaye-Smith; E. V. Knox; Rose Macaulay; John Masefield; A. A. Milne; Naomi Mitchison; Charles Morgan; Henry W. Nevinson; R. Ellis Roberts; V. Sackville-West; Beatrice Kean Seymour; William Kean Seymour; Evelyn Sharp; Helen Simpson; Ralph Straus; Frank Swinnerton; H. M. Tomlinson; H. G. Wells; Rebecca West; Virginia Woolf.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 762-764

Sir, – In view of the increasing numbers of actions brought against authors and publishers we submit that the time has come for drastic reforms in the law relating to literary libel.1 Under existing conditions many of the great classics of the past could not have been published without grave risk of suppression, since it is mainly authors of repute, who are endeavouring to give credible pictures of contemporary life, whose work is in jeopardy. A serious threat to the quality of English literature obviously exists when the freedom of expression of reputable authors is limited by a fear of flimsy...

read more

A Chelsea Square Trolley-Bus Proposal. To the Editor of The Times (31 July 1937)

Max Beerbohm, Clive Bell, E. F. Benson, David Cecil, Kenneth Clark, W. G. Constable, Crewe, Campbell Dodgson, T. S. Eliot, Arundell Esdaile, Peter Fleming, John Gretton, Wilson Harris, George Hill, A. M. Hind, C. E. M. Joad, Rose Macaulay, Edward Maufe, Charles Morgan, H. V. Morton, Robert Nichols, Charles Peers, Eileen Power, Herbert Read, A. E. Richardson, William Rothenstein, Walter Russell, Osbert Sitwell, J. C. Squire, P. Wilson Steer, Henry G. Strauss, G. M. Trevelyan, Hugh Walpole, Clough William-Ellis, Virginia Woolf, Evelyn Wrench, F. Yeats-Brown, G. M. Young.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 765-766

Sir, – Paultons Square is a quiet residential neighbourhood in Chelsea, lying between the King’s Road and Chelsea Embankment. It possesses considerable architectural charm, having been symmetrically designed early in the nineteenth century, and its gardens contain some exceptionally fine trees. Hitherto its freedom from through traffic has made it safe both for the children of the residents and for more than 300 other children who use it four times a day as a thoroughfare to and from schools near by. The peaceful atmosphere of the square is prized equally by those who live in it...

read more

The Dean of Rochester. To the Editor of The Times (14 Sept 1937)

Selborne, Halifax, Hugh Cecil, Arthur Chandler, T. S. Eliot, B. J. Kidd, A. H. MacDonald, W. Spens, Guy M. Kindersley (hon. Treasurer).

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 767

Sir, – There must be many people who appreciate the great work which Dr. Francis Underhill, the Dean of Rochester, has done for the Church of England, and many who remember his ministry in Birmingham, Oxford, and in London.1

We therefore feel that we should not like this opportunity of his forthcoming consecration as Bishop of Bath and Wells to pass by unmarked.

It is proposed that our recognition of this event should take the form...

read more

Mr. Wyndham Lewis’s Works. To the Editor of The Times (22 Dec 1937)

Henry Moore, Eric Gill, Paul Nash, Mark Gertler, Edmund Dulac, Edward Wadsworth, P. H. Jowett, Randolph Schwabe, John Piper, Serge Chermayeff, Raymond McGrath, Arthur Bliss, Michael E. Sadler, T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden, Herbert Read, Rhondda, Rebecca West, Naomi Mitchison, Stephen Spender, Geoffrey Grigson.

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 768

Sir, – Many years have passed since the strange mind of Wyndham Lewis began to invigorate English painting and letters.

Mr. Lewis is now holding his first exhibition since 1921, and it seems to us an appropriate time to suggest that Lewis’s deep and original art should be publicly recognized.1 Social change has made it inevitable that in these days the place and duties of the private patron should be handed over, in a large degree, to the public galleries; and those rarer artists whose vision and...

read more

A Liberal Manifesto: The Place of Reason in the Thought of the Church. The Church Times (20 Jan 1939)

W. S. Baker (Vicar of St. John’s, Newcastle-on-Tyne), H. N. Bate (Dean of York), F. H. Brabant (Canon of Winchester), S. C. Carpenter (Dean of Exeter), T. S. Eliot, A. B. Emden, C. P. Hankey (Chaplain, St. John’s, Menton), Leonard Hodgson (Canon of Christ Church and Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology), C. Clement H. James (Vicar of St. Giles’, Cambridge), Wilfred Knox, O.G.S. (Hon. Canon of Ely), T. Knox-Shaw, F. E. P. S. Langton (Vicar of the Holy Redeemer, Clerkenwell), J. H. B. Mace (Rector of Holy Trinity, Winchester), E. J. Marriot (Canon of Westminster), Robert Mortimer (Student of Christ Church and Lecturer in Theology), Phillip H. Rogers (Vicar of St. Stephen’s, Bournemouth), E. G. Selwyn (Dean of Winchester), Roscow Shedden, Bishop (Vicar of Wantage), Will Spens, and H. E. Wynn, O.G.S.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 769-774

There are many people in England who, though they rarely attend the services of the Church, have a real sense of the need for religion. We believe that a large number have given up the practice of going to church either because they have been offered a form of worship which does not satisfy their needs, or because the Christian religion has been inadequately presented to them. We believe that a Catholic interpretation of the position of the Church of England has the decisive advantage of recognizing that in the divisions which have rent Christendom truth does not lie...

read more

Evacuation – A Social Landmark. The Christian News-Letter (15 Nov 1939)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 775-782

Evacuation is a challenge to our society. It is a challenge to our inveterate social complacency. Even those who were not unaware of slum conditions have recoiled at the full realisation that there are thousands of families which live like sub-human cave dwellers (and are forced so to live) in the midst of our great cities; even those who are not good at arithmetic are worried how it is that a child costs 8s. 6d. a week in the country, and 3s. in the town when its father is unemployed. It is a challenge to our capacity to put forth new social tissue: for evacuation has been as a great jagged...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 783-808

Color Gallery

pdf iconDownload PDF