Cover

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Title page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

We are very pleased to see this project come to fruition. Adjusting the Lens has been many years in the making and we are grateful for all the suggestions, critiques, and encouragement we have received along the way. We are especially grateful to the contributing authors for their patience and perseverance during this long editorial process, and for their commitment to this project. The seed for this collaborative volume was planted when we and Ana Rosa Duarte Duarte collaborated on a panel at the “Geographical Imaginaries and...

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Adjusting the Lens: An Introduction

Freya Schiwy and Byrt Wammack Weber

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pp. 11-20

In a recent essay, Laurel C. Smith describes the reception to Dulce convivencia (Sweet gathering) (2004), a documentary short directed by the Mixe filmmaker Filoteo Gómez Martínez, when it was screened during an academic symposium at a university in Xalapa, Veracruz.1 While some members of the audience praised the film for its visually striking depiction of Mixe cultural tradition, an anthropologist attending the event criticized this even-paced meditation on the rural production of azucar panela (unrefined whole cane...

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Chapter 1. (Re)Imagining Diaspora: Two Decades of Video with a Mayan Accent

Byrt Wammack Weber

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pp. 21-46

In the introduction to his book An Accented Cinema, Hamid Naficy recalls the experience of sitting in the screening room of MK2 Productions in Paris in the mid-1990s to review a film by one of Iran’s best new directors. To avoid censorship, the film had been shot in Turkey, and the dialogue was in Turkish. Naficy hurriedly took notes as he tried to follow the French subtitles, writing in English, except for those moments when a friend’s whispered Persian translation helped to clarify the story. According to Naficy, the “multiple acts of...

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Chapter 2. Geographies, Diasporas, and Communities Revisited

Elías Barón Levín Rojo
Translated by Byrt Wammack Weber and Freya Schiwy

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pp. 47-78

Look, over there, as if you’re looking at the back, behind the channel that the river made before they ran it through the culvert, that’s where the other side begins.
Are you sure?
The land continues, the rains and sun still affect it just the same. If I say “plain” it sounds the same as “plane,” but yes, over there it begins.
And your voice, how far does it reach?...

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Chapter 3. Arroz con leche: Audiovisual Poetry and the Politics of Everyday Life

Ana Rosa Duarte Duarte
Translated by Byrt Wammack Weber

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pp. 79-97

In Mexico, we have a sacred tree—Yolcacuahuitl, in Nahuatl; Yaxché, in Yucatec Maya—that is often depicted in traditional ceramic crafts as a colorful, bountiful tree, heavily laden with fruits and creatures of every kind imaginable, a life-giving source of flora and fauna. It is also a popular and recurring theme in the traditional embroidery of Mayan and other autochthonous garments. For curator and writer Araceli Zúñiga, this arbol de la vida (tree...

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Chapter 4. Shaping the Taraspanglish Diaspora

Argelia González Hurtado

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pp. 98-126

The complexity of migration is one of the recurrent themes on the agendas of indigenous video makers. This is perhaps partly owing to the adhesion of indigenous groups to migratory currents for centuries.1 Proof of this is the journey of the Mexica people, who undertook a long pilgrimage beginning from their homeland, the mythical Aztlán, to the foundation of the great Tenochtitlán, an exodus recorded pictorially in the Boturini Codex (also known as Tira de la peregrinación [Strip depicting the pilgrimage]). Just as the...

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Chapter 5. Patron Saint Fiesta Videos: Mediatization and Transnationalization Between the Sierra Mixe and California

Ingrid Kummels

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pp. 127-158

The fiesta in honor of Santa Rosa de Lima is a central public spectacle that takes place annually in the village of Tamazulapam in the highlands of the Distrito Mixe in Mexico.1 The fiesta I witnessed in August 2013 was a veritable multimedia event. Two local enterprises—the internet provider (ciber) Tuuk Nëëm and the internet radio station Yin Et Radio—broadcast livestream video from the village’s main plaza between the municipal building and the church. For the first time, migrants from Tamazulapam, who have largely settled in the...

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Chapter 6. Romper el cerco: An Ethnography of Transnational Collaborative Film

Livia K. Stone

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pp. 159-190

In early May 2006 a nationally televised spectacle erupted in Mexico as protesters clashed with police in San Salvador Atenco, a rural community on the outskirts of Mexico City. According to the televised news, protesters had blocked the highway that ran alongside the community, police were sent to reopen it, and the protesters beat back the police with unprecedented physical violence. The nation continued to watch as early the next morning thousands of police entered Atenco, beating those they found in the streets, and violently...

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Chapter 7. The Open Invitation: Some Notes on Video Activism and the Politics of Affect

Freya Schiwy

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pp. 191-212

The Promedios/Chiapas Media Project documentary Un tren muy grande que se llama La Otra Campaña (A very big train called the Other Campaign) chronicles the beginning of the Zapatista’s Other Campaign in 2005. The video opens with long shots of the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN) arriving on horseback at an unnamed community where a diverse crowd of representatives from social movement organizations awaits....

Notes

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pp. 213-238

Bibliography

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pp. 239-252

Filmography

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pp. 253-256

Contributors

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pp. 257-260

Index

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pp. 261-272

Back Cover

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p. 273