Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-ii

Contents

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pp. iii-iv

List of Illustrations and Figures

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgements

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pp. vii-viii

This collection is the final fruit of a project marking the four-hundredth anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. From January to April 2016, we oversaw more than forty separate events for diverse audiences, ranging from the sublime (Hamlet read in the thirty-five languages spoken...

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Shakespeare and Canada: “Remembrance of Ourselves”

Irena R. Makaryk and Kathryn Prince

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pp. 1-9

“Must there no more be done?” Laertes’ anguished cry in response to the truncated ritual performed over his dead sister, Ophelia, draws attention to the human need for the comfort of ceremonies that bring together the individual and the community in shared expressions...

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"Theatre is not a nursing home": Merchants of Venice of the Stratford Festival

C. E. McGee

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pp. 10-26

The Stratford Festival Merchant of Venice at the Avon Theatre in 1996 was a turning point in the history of productions of that play there with a series of “firsts.” The sixth Stratford production of this play, the 1996 Merchant was the first to be directed by a woman, Marti Maraden....

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Intercultural Performance and The Stratford Festival as Global Tourist Place: Leon Rubin’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Twelfth Night

Robert Ormsby

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pp. 27-48

In 2006, Leon Rubin stated that he had tried to “reimagine Shakespeare in a more global and cultural context” throughout the five years that he had been directing at the Stratford Festival.1 As he commented in his program note to Twelfth Night, his productions usually drew on...

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Stratford, Shakespeare, and J. D. Barnett

Ian Rae

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pp. 49-70

Stratford, Ontario, enjoys the highest rate of arts-related employment per capita in Canada (Denis-Jacob 2012, Polèse 2011). The artistic reputation of this city of 33,000 hinges upon the activities of the Stratford Festival, as well as on the reaction of Canada’s alternative...

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Counterfactual History at The Stratford Festival: Timothy Findley’s Elizabeth Rex and Peter Hinton’s The Swanne

Peter Kuling

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pp. 71-78

Peter Hinton’s The Swanne trilogy premièred at what was then the Stratford Festival of Canada (now simply the Stratford Festival) in 2002, inviting the audience to embark on a long, speculative journey through a messy alternative history that culminates in the coronation...

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“Who’s There?”: Slings & Arrows’ Audience Dynamics

Kailin Wright

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pp. 79-95

If Hamlet begins with a knock-knock joke, then so too does Slings & Arrows, as it too asks “Who’s there?” A television series inspired in part by Canada’s Stratford Festival, Slings & Arrows dramatizes the backstage workings of the fictional New Burbage Theatre Festival and...

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Race, National Identity, and the Hauntological Ethics of Slings & Arrows

Don Moore

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pp. 96-110

In Specters of Marx, Jacques Derrida (1994) unpacks his concept of hauntology, which is a thinking of ethical inheritance and responsibility that evokes both Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto (which begins “A specter is haunting Europe”) and William Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Much...

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Performing “Indigenous Shakespeare”in Canada: The Tempest and The Death of a Chief

Sarah Mackenzie

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pp. 111-126

While Indigenous theatre cannot be confined to its particular ethnographic and political dimensions, much Indigenous drama and literature continues to contend with the concerns of Indigenous communities, most prominently Canada’s colonialist legacy.1 Emerging as...

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Shakespeare, a Late Bloomeron the Quebec Stage

Annie Brisset

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pp. 127-156

The following study examines Shakespeare’s late arrival to the francophone stages of Quebec. After a long period of indifference toward the English playwright par excellence, Québécois translations of Shakespeare began to appear at the end of the 1960s. They remained relatively

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Mediatic Shakespeare: McLuhan and the Bard

Richard Cavell

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pp. 157-176

Writing to his mother, the elocutionist Elsie Hall McLuhan, in 1931, when he was a twenty-year-old student at the University of Manitoba, Herbert Marshall McLuhan made one of his first recorded comments about Shakespeare, in whom McLuhan would retain a life-long...

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Shakespeare and the “Cultural Lag” of Canadian Stratford in Alice Munro’s “Tricks”

Troni Y. Grande

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pp. 177-197

Alice Munro has achieved iconic status on the Canadian literary scene and the world stage as the first Canadian to be chosen as a Nobel Laureate in Literature.1 The Swedish Academy, in awarding Munro the 2013 Nobel Prize, proclaimed her international significance as “master...

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Beyond (or Beneath) the Folio: Neil Freeman’s Shakespearean Acting Pedagogy in Context

Tom Scholte

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pp. 198-213

In the mid-2000s, upon the occasion of his retirement, I had the intimidating assignment of replacing the nationally and internationally renowned, and larger than life, Neil Freeman as the teacher of Shakespearean acting at the University of British Columbia (UBC)...

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Rhyme and Reason: Shakespeare’s Exceptional Status and Role in Canadian Education

Dana M. Colarusso

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pp. 214-239

For over a century, Shakespeare has maintained an exceptional status in the educational curriculum of Canada. Although education is a provincial responsibility, Shakespeare’s prominence in the English Language Arts curriculum has remained remarkably constant from...

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The Truth About Stories About Shakespeare . . . In Canada?

Daniel Fischlin

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pp. 240-262

This essay uses Thomas King’s notions of indigenous story to address how meaning about Shakespeare occurs within national contexts. Meanings, the so-called truth about stories about Shakespeare, necessarily refract through other dimensions of the stories we tell about identity...

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Contributors

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pp. 263-266

ANNIE BRISSET. Professor emerita, University of Ottawa, School of Translation and Interpretation, FRSC. Prize-winning author on translation, founding member and past president of IATIS (International Association for Translation and Intercultural...

Index

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pp. 267-270