Cover

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Half Title, Further Series Titles, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Much of the early work on this book was supported by a research grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. I am also grateful for financial support received from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Carleton University. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-4

There are a lot of things this book does not get into. For any writer on music, that is a familiar situation, because it is notoriously difficult to fit even a small part of the listening experience into words. A few seconds of listening will uncover countless nuances that were not even hinted at, no matter how thorough the author aims to be. ...

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1. Delineating Psychedelia: Topic Theory and Popular Music Cultures

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pp. 5-28

They would have been fresh in so many ways, those first fourteen seconds. The sonics alone would have stood out: stinging, droning chords with a soaring, catchy hook over the top. The sound of the lead guitar would have drawn special attention, cutting melodic fuzz at a time when that was still a new thing. This was only the second Yardbirds single to venture far from their blues roots and just their fourth overall. ...

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2. Developments through 1966

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pp. 29-103

The period 1965–66 was a decisive one for the development of psychedelia. In musical terms, by the end of 1965 the Yardbirds had begun to explore most of the components that would be essential to their later, more obviously psychedelic work. The Beatles had released Rubber Soul, the Kinks had released “See My Friends,” and a great deal of sonic experimentation had taken place in genres such as instrumental surf rock. ...

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3. The Later 1960s

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pp. 104-198

By the end of 1966, most of the musical topics central to psychedelia had been introduced in one form or another. In chapter 2 we gained an overview of this emergent topical field, surveying its major areas. With that perspective available, the rest of the book will be more thematic, focusing on selected important developments of later periods. ...

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4. The 1970s

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pp. 199-227

At the end of the last chapter, I used the metaphor of critical mass to sum up psychedelia in the late 1960s. One attractive thing about that metaphor is that it highlighted the transitional nature of the period, signaling that profound changes were about to take place. But the metaphor is also potentially misleading in at least two ways. ...

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5. The 1980s and On

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pp. 228-263

There is a genuine question as to whether any significant new topics were added to psychedelia after the mid-1970s. There were undoubtedly new styles, new contexts, and new combinations, so the specific scope, affect, and other aspects of the old topics shifted. In principle, these kinds of shifts could be sufficient to create altogether new topics, ...

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Epilogue: Conclusions and Prospects

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pp. 264-266

My goals for this book were fairly modest. Most importantly, I wanted to explore the idea that new topics and new topical fields are always emerging and that contemporary popular genres such as psychedelia are a good place to look for them. In addition, I wanted to demonstrate that topic theory can be a valuable tool for popular music studies—indeed, ...

Appendix A: The Sample and Discography

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pp. 267-272

Appendix B: The San Francisco Poster Sample

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pp. 273-274

Appendix C: Some Notes on the Transcriptions

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pp. 275-276

List of References

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pp. 277-284

Index

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pp. 285-292

About the Author

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