Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Introduction. Landscapes and Landmarks of Canada: Real, Imagined, (Re)Viewed

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pp. 1-10

In their influential article about memorialization on Canada’s Parliament Hill, David Gordon and Brian Osborne reflect on the role of statues and other landmarks in creating, focusing, and sustaining national identity. They note:
One of the principal strategies of nationalising in overcoming internal difference...

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1. Canada: Islands, Landscapes, and Landmarks

Stephen A. Royle

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pp. 11-26

A famous geographical phrase that undoubtedly applies to Canada is “from sea to shining sea,” although the fact that it is found in the American patriotic song “America the Beautiful” rather handicaps its use in a Canadian context. Instead Canada, in the words of its national anthem in English...

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2. Science at Service of Sublime Landscapes: Scientific Ecology and the Preservation of Canada’s Wilderness Landmarks in 1970s Quebec

Olivier Craig-Dupont

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pp. 27-46

As with the first geological surveys of the eighteenth century (analyzed by historian Suzanne Zeller), government agencies often used science as a means to define and confirm the idea of the nation-state.2 Even while enabling a rational framing of the natural environment, science emphasizes the...

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3. Patriotisms of the People: Understanding the “Highway of Heroes” as a Canadian National Landmark

Tracey Raney

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pp. 47-62

In February 2002, Canadian prime minister Jean Chrétien sent 850 troops from the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light infantry to Afghanistan as part of “Operation Enduring Freedom.” Between 2002 and 2011, 158 Canadian soldiers died in Afghanistan during this mission. In addition to the grief experienced...

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4. Material Differences: Ethnic Diversity and the Power of Things in Greater Sudbury

Tim Nieguth

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pp. 63-76

It has become commonplace in the social sciences to suggest that human communities, identities, and perceptions of reality are social constructs rather than natural givens. To mention just one example among many others, Benedict Anderson’s oft-cited definition of the nation insists that nations are “imagined...

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5. Our Home and Native Land: Invocations of the Land in the 2011 Canadian Federal Election

Shauna Wilton

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pp. 77-90

The land is closely connected to national identity and nationalism. Images of the land remind citizens of who they are and where they belong. Territorial borders demarcate the land that belongs to the people and create a clear division between us and them. People fight and die to protect the land and its...

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6. Memorializing an Imagined Past: Evangeline and the Acadian Deportation

Jane Moss

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pp. 91-108

One of the great ironies of Acadian history is that the communal tragedy of the 1755 Deportation was made known to the world by the American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Published in 1847, the bestselling long poem Evangeline relates the tragic story of two young Acadian...

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7. Time and Space in the Nationalism of Thomas D’Arcy McGee

David A. Wilson

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pp. 109-122

On May 2, 1860, Thomas D’Arcy McGee gave the most memorable speech of his Canadian political career. The politicians and journalists listening in the Legislative Assembly responded with “loud and general applause,” and even McGee’s political enemies praised his oratory.1 During the...

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8. Contesting Historical Space: The Campaign to Have Grosse Île Designated a National Historic Site with the Irish Dimension as its Main Theme

Pádraig Breandán Ó Laighin

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pp. 123-144

The proposal to develop Grosse Île as a National Historic Site dedicated primarily to the theme of immigration to Canada generated a unique contest over the control and management of historical space. Grounded in contemporary political contexts and in a conservative canon of Canadian history...

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9. Environmental Exposure: Two films “de légitime défense”: Richard Desjardins and Robert Monderie: L’erreur boréale / Forest Alert (1999) and Trou Story / The Hole Story (2011)

Rachel Killick

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pp. 145-174

In Montreal and Quebec City, autumn 2011 was marked, as in other Western cities from London to San Francisco, by the occupation of public space by activists protesting against the excesses and failures of the capitalist system. In Montreal, the occupation of Victoria Square by “le Camp des Indignés” serendipitously...

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10. Postcolonial Territorial Landmarks within Canada’s Multiculturalism: The Myth of Virility

Édith-Anne Pageot, translated by Guy Laverdure

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pp. 175-196

It is a well-established fact that territorial references and myths associated with the Canadian “North” and the Canadian “wilderness” have strongly influenced the collective imagination and significantly contributed to the identification of Canadian national landmarks. This has played a fundamental role...

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11. Mapping the Migrant Mindscape in Gabrielle Roy: A Macro Definition of écriture migrante

Julie Rodgers

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pp. 197-216

Identified as a new current in Québécois literature in the 1980s, the term écriture migrante1 is one that has incited much academic debate as to how it should be defined and, indeed, to whom the label can be applied.2 Écriture migrante became emblematic of the end of the twentieth century in Canada, especially...

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12. The Green Fields of Canada – Forgotten! A Reappraisal of Irish Traditional Music History in Canada

Gearóid Ó hAllmhuráin

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pp. 217-242

When analyzed through the prism of diaspora, the transmission of Irish music across the Atlantic encapsulates critical non-textual forms of cultural memory that have taken root in North America over the course of four centuries. Hitherto neglected by Irish cultural historians, the...

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13. The Contemporary Powwow in Eastern Canada: A Practice of Gathering

Dalie Giroux and Amélie-Anne Mailhot, translated by Carmen Grillo

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pp. 243-260

Present-day powwows in Indian Country offer an unparalleled experience of sight and sound: the dancers moving in colour through the circles, voices soft and loud telling stories, praying, and honouring ancestors, the old and the young standing side by side, learning from one other and celebrating...

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About the Authors

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pp. 261-266

Maeve Conrick is Professor and former Principal of the UCD College of Arts and Humanities, University College Dublin, Ireland. She has published extensively in books and journals in the areas of Sociolinguistics and Applied Linguistics, with particular reference to French and English in Canada, France, and Ireland...

Index

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pp. 267-288