Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedications

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgements

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pp. ix-x

Waters, we thank you! The Downstream anthology comes from many streams that have flowed together. We would like to thank all the contributors, as well as the many participants and helpers whose efforts helped to make the Downstream gathering happen in a good way in March 2012, including but not limited to Florence...

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Introduction: Re-storying Waters, Re-storying Relations

Rita Wong and Dorothy Christian

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pp. 1-26

In March 2002, we the co-editors, Rita Wong and Dorothy Christian, met at a conference organized by Lee Maracle, called Imagining Asian and Native Women: Deconstructing from Contact to Modern Times at Western Washington University. This conference brought together Indigenous and Asian Canadian.

Part I: Contexts for Knowing and Unknowing Water

1. Planetary Distress Signals

Alanna Mitchell

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pp. 29-32

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2. Water

Lee Maracle

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pp. 33-38

In his book, The Hollow Tree, Herb Nabigon talks about humbling ourselves to water. I had struggled with the Ojibway concept of humility—humbling ourselves to water—until this moment. I understand this. I understood myself so much more completely than at any other moment in my life. So much of my...

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3. Interweaving Water: The Incremental Transformation of Sovereign Knowledge into Collaborative Knowledge

Michael D. Blackstock

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pp. 39-50

A common plot sequence in First Nations oral history is where the main character first transcends a world boundary and then quickly transforms from human to animal or vice versa to adjust to the new world. This sequence is a helpful analogy that modern ontology could take notice of as a prerequisite...

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4. Water and Knowledge

Astrida Neimanis

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pp. 51-68

A simple proposition: “The way we live in the world is bound to what we imagine the world to be.”8
How we treat the world is bound to how we think the world. Theory—that is, ways, patterns, and frameworks of and for thinking—is a kind of imagination. Through its imaginative choreography...

5. Excerpts from “a child’s fable”

Baco Ohama

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pp. 69-72

Part II: Water Testimonies: Witness, Worry, and Work

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6. Water: The First Foundation of Life

Mona Polacca

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pp. 75-80

I am of the Hopi-Havasupai people of the southwest in Arizona, North America. One of the concerns that we are dealing with right now is the uranium mining occurring above the Grand Canyon. The Havasupai people are called the people of the blue water, and they live at the bottom of the...

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7. From Our Homelands to the Tar Sands

Melina Laboucan Massimo

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pp. 81-88

I come from the community of Little Buffalo, and I am a member of the Lubicon Cree First Nation. I’m also a climate energy campaigner with Greenpeace Canada. The traditional territory of the Lubicon Cree covers approximately ten thousand square kilometres of low-lying trees, forests, rivers, plains...

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8. Keepers of the Water: Nishnaabe-kwewag Speaking for the Water

Renée Elizabeth Mzinegiizhigo-kwe Bédard

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pp. 89-106

Nishnaabeg people have always lived along the water of the Great Lakes.2 The ziibii’ganan (rivers), zaagiganan (lakes), bog’tingoon (rapids), wiikwedoon (bays), dkibiin (natural springs), biitooshk-biisenyin (swamps), and ziigiinsan3 (streams) have sustained the Nishnaabeg people on these traditional...

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9. Water Walk Pedagogy

Violet Caibaiosai

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pp. 107-112

As an Anishinabe-kwe of the Sagamok Anishinabek I lived my early years along the waters of the north shore of Georgian Bay on Lake Huron. It is my great fortune that for the first six years of my life I was raised along the side of my Anishinabe family before being taken to the residential school in...

10. A Response to Pascua Lama

Cecilia Vicuña

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pp. 113-114

Part III: Shared Ethical and Embodied Practices

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11. Moving with Water: Relationships and Responsibilities

Alannah Young Leon and Denise Marie Nadeau

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pp. 117-138

We—Alannah Young Leon and Denise Nadeau—have collaborated since the late 1990s in bringing together embodied pedagogies and water responsibilities from our respective epistemological traditions. Our intention has been to work from body wisdoms to create education tools for reconciling...

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12. Bodies of Water: Meaning in Movement

Seonagh Odhiambo Horne

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pp. 139-160

Asava Dance is an ensemble based in Los Angeles that has been working with participatory water ethics as part of its creative development process, most notably in the performance of Bodies of Water, which toured in North America 2011–12. As the founding artistic director of this ensemble, I...

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13. Upstream: A Conversation with Water

Cathy Stubington

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pp. 161-180

As one water body speaking to another water body, dear reader, I would like to tell you about Sawllkwa, Runaway Moon Theatre’s community performance celebrating the water that we are part of, and that is part of us. Named after the word for water in the Secwepemc language, Sawllkwa was presented...

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14. Ice Receding/Books Reseeding

Basia Irland

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pp. 181-192

At dusk in January a beaver has just finished chewing through a willow branch to carry it to his lodge when he sees an object float by, bobbing up and down on the muddy-red water of the Río Grande near Albuquerque, New Mexico. Among the salt cedar on a small sandbar, a non-migrating Canada...

15. Tsunami Chant

Wang Ping

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pp. 193-194

Part IV: A Respectful Coexistence in Common: Water Perspectives

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16 Listening to the Elders at the Keepers of the Water Gathering

Radha D’Souza

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pp. 197-206

Lac Brochet is just 7 degrees below the Arctic Circle, a small dot on the map by Lake Brochet after which it is named, a place where the horizon appears to be within walking distance, where ink-blue skies spread like a rooftop above your head, where life ambles on and follows the rhythms of...

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17. Coastal Waters in Distress from Excessive Nutrients

Paul J. Harrison

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pp. 207-216

Water issues have become the most ecologically fraught question of the twenty-first century. Water serves as the seemingly silent receptacle for the toxins that we dump into our rivers and flush down our sewage system, much of which ends up in our oceans. As Astrida Neimanis outlined (Neimanis...

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18. Bodies of Water: Asian Canadians In/Action with Water

Janey Lew

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pp. 217-240

I would like to acknowledge that I wrote this chapter while living on the ancestral, unceded territories of Coast Salish peoples. The essay touches upon my observations and experiences while living on the ancestral territories of the Huchuin (Ohlone) peoples. My gratitude for the privilege of living and...

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19. Permeable Toronto: A Hydro-Eutopia

Janine MacLeod

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pp. 241-258

One spring several years ago, I attended a Lost Rivers tour in my Toronto neighbourhood. The tour followed the course of an invisible waterway known by its colonial name, Garrison Creek. There were subtle signs of its presence here and there, depressions in the urban topography, old bridges...

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20. Saturate/Dissolve: Water for Itself, Un-Settler Responsibilities, and Radical Humility

Larissa Lai

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pp. 259-270

I start with these profound words by Lee Maracle. I read them as deep knowledge— water knowledge—but also as a poem and a translation. Lee Maracle calls us all—Indigenous peoples, Asians, settlers, thinkers, justice-oriented people—to recognize the integrity of water, its agency, its power unto itself. I...

21. Bring Me Back

Janet Rogers

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pp. 271-274

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About the Contributors

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pp. 275-280

Renée E. Mzinegiizhigo-kwe Bédard is of Anishinaabeg ancestry and a member of Dokis First Nation. She holds a PhD from Trent University. She is currently an Assistant Professor at Nipissing University in the Department of Native Studies. Her area of publication includes work related to mothering, environmental...

Index

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pp. 281-290