Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

The essays in this collection have their origins in a conference held at Northwestern University in June 2013 in honor of T. H. Breen. The conference would have never come off without the work of Elizabeth Lewis Pardoe. A first- rate historian and an able administrator (a rara avis, in other words...

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Introduction: Imagining an American Imperial-Revolutionary History

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pp. 1-24

Some questions never change. For the period of the American Revolution, they remain fixed and can be summed up in the invocation of key years. How do we get from 1763 to 1776? And from 1776 to 1787? These simple questions, the sort that are standard issue for any American history survey...

Part I. Empire and Provincials

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The Baubles of America: Object Lessons from the Eclectic Empire of Peter Williamson

Timothy J. Shannon

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pp. 27-49

In October 1776 a curious advertisement appeared in the Scots Spy, a magazine published by Edinburgh publican and printer Peter Williamson: “To be Sold by way of Lottery; a pair of American gray Squirrels, about eighteen Months old, are very tame and tractable, and need no confinement in cages...

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Imperial Vineyards; Wine and Politics in the Early American South

Owen Stanwood

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pp. 50-70

Louis de Mesnil de Saint- Pierre had a simple vision: to turn the American South into a vast vineyard. In 1770 the French gentleman and Protestant refugee traveled from his adopted home of New Bordeaux, South Carolina, to sell his dream to possible English benefactors. One of the leaders of a settlement...

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Sex and Empire in Eighteenth-Century St. Louis

Patricia Cleary

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pp. 71-87

Sex matters. Sexual conduct, misconduct, and reputation; sex inside and outside of marriage; the legal, religious, and demographic repercussions of sexual activities: all of these preoccupied European authorities. With European migration bringing more men than women to colonial outposts in North...

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On Their Own Ground: Native Power and Colonial Property on the Maine Frontier

Ian Saxine

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pp. 88-108

Joseph Moody, a resident of the frontier community of York, Maine, began keeping a diary in 1720. The son of York’s pastor, Moody had begun the project to chart his spiritual progress. But while he contemplated the power of the Almighty, Moody also provided abundant testimony about the power of...

Part II. War, Revolution, Empires

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Efficient and Effective: The Deceptive Success of British Strategy atFort Stanwix during the Seven Years’ War

James Coltrain

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pp. 111-126

A first glance, little about the daily operations at Fort Stanwix would have suggested an administrative success. A dreary, frostbitten, hastily constructed assemblage of timber and earth at the least accessible point of a journey between colonial New York City and the Great Lakes, the eighteenth-century...

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Rethinking Failure: The French Empire in the Age of John Law

Christopher Hodson

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pp. 127-146

For over two centuries, failure has haunted the history of France’s early modern Atlantic empire. The evidence appears damning. Overwhelmed by the resourcefulness of rivals and hamstrung by constitutional defects, historians have told us, the Bourbon kings and their subjects overseas never pulled a...

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John Almon’s Web: Networks of Print, Politics, and Place inRevolutionary London, 1760–1780

Michael Guenther

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pp. 147-168

Genuinely democratic revolutions—of the kind that originate from the “bottom- up”—pose something of an interpretive challenge to historians. How do we explain the fact that ordinary people, in certain times and places, are capable of generating such extraordinary transformations, breaking the...

Part III. The Ghosts of Empire

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Forgiving and Forgetting in Postrevolutionary America

Donald F. Johnson

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pp. 171-188

The conclusion of the Revolutionary War forced Americans who cooperated with the British army to grapple not only with the new realities of independence but also with their own complicity in the failed attempt to preserve imperial authority. It is not unusual at the end of a revolutionary struggle...

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Abbe’s Ghost: Negotiating Slavery in Paris, 1783–1784

David N. Gellman

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pp. 189-211

The servants sensed a ghostly presence, but their masters laughed. Abbe, a married slave woman from colonial New Jersey, had traveled to Madrid and then to Paris with the family of John Jay as he embarked on a diplomatic journey that ultimately secured independence for the fledgling United States...

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Seeing Like an Antiquarian: Popular Nostalgia and the Rise of a Modern Historical Subjectivity in the 1820s

Seth Cotlar

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pp. 212-232

In his book Seeing Like a State, anthropologist James Scott delineated the historically specific subjectivity that animated the leaders of high modernist states—the ways of knowing that structured how they looked at and acted upon the societies over which they presided.1 In a similar though more modest...

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Conclusion: What Time Was the American Revolution?Reflections on a Familiar Narrative

T. H. Breen

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pp. 233-246

Even to pose the question—What time was the American Revolution?—seems slightly perverse, since in fact the temporal boundaries of the American Revolution from initial colonial grievance to the achievement of political stability under the federal Constitution have been well established in our...

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Afterword

Joyce E. Chaplin

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pp. 247-262

At the time I first consulted it, on May 3, 2013, Timothy H. Breen’s online curriculum vitae included eleven items under the heading of “Books” and sixty-three under “Articles.” I felt discouraged—not over the prospect of writing an assessment of Breen’s oeuvre but because he has been so shamingly productive...

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Contributors

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pp. 263-264

T. H. Breen, author of several volumes on colonial and revolutionary American history, is the William Smith Mason Professor of American History Emeritus at Northwestern University and the James Marsh Professor-at-Large at the University of Vermont. He is also currently the Kluge Professor...

Index

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pp. 265-269

Early American Histories

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p. 270