Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Epigraph

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

The subjects of this book may be “Germans” living in Central Europe— more specifically, the “German minority” in Hungary—but the book’s purpose is to question the notion that Germans are Germans. I would argue that a term such as “German,” as well as similar expressions used...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xvi

The Hungarian Germans and the issue of tangible belonging have woven themselves into the fabric of my life (as well as the lives of those around me) for more than a decade. I have labored in numerous archives and libraries in Hungary, Germany, Austria, and the United States, and I have listened...

read more

Note on Terminology

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xvii-xviii

Despite the practice of many scholars who differentiate between “Hungarians” as all inhabitants of the country and “Magyars” as ethnic Hungarians, in this work I refer to the people of Hungary as Hungarians. The distinction made by many scholars does not exist in Magyar—the language of...

Maps

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-24

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

I visited the southern Hungarian village of Máriakéménd for the first time in the winter of 2006. I was there—on the advice of former members of the community now living in Germany—to meet with two men who could tell me about the way the German minority in Hungary lived...

read more

1. A Rural World, before 1918

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-70

I met Antal Weisz, an elderly farmer in the southern Hungarian village of Nagynyárád, in early 2002.1 He was one of my first interview partners in a former Hungarian-German village. (Most of my interviews until then had been with former villagers now living in more urban areas.) My hope was...

read more

2. Cultural Contact, post 1918

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-127

The head archivist in the Baranya County Archives introduced me to János Ravasz, whose Hungarian last name translates to “shrewd” in English. A village scholar, Ravasz published a journal about his Swabian community of Szederkény, one of only two such publications in the country, and apart...

read more

3. Minorit y Making, 1920s

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 128-184

My effort to understand what “being German” meant for the Swabians in Hungary took me to the German Foreign Ministry archives in the former East Berlin. Those archives house material sent to and from the ministry, as well as documents collected in German legations abroad, including...

read more

4. A Unique Identity, 1930s

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 185-227

Ethnographers have provided us with many colorful descriptions of Hungarian Germans and their villages. Unlike historians, who traditionally search for the appropriate documents and piece together events in a chronological narrative, ethnographers describe what they see and experience. They offer...

read more

5. The Volk Triumphant, the Second World War

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 228-300

Before the end of the Second World War, approximately 1,500 German speakers lived in the village of Máriakéménd, but today the community can boast only 500 inhabitants. Just a few of those individuals are descendants of Swabians, since most Máriakéménders were expelled to Germany...

read more

6. Return to Minority, 1945–1993

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 301-344

I frequently visited László and Erzsébet Szita while conducting research in southern Hungary. László had been the head archivist at the Baranya county archives, and after retiring he and his wife settled in the former Hungarian-German community of Vokány. (László himself was of Swabian...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 345-364

The quotes from Oscar Jászi (a Hungarian social scientist) and Jakob Bleyer highlight one of the deep-rooted contradictions in the study of Central and Eastern Europe: on the one hand, national, ethnic, völkisch belonging is recognized as a social construct of our modern era; on the other...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 365-428

Selected Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 429-446

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 447-456

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF