Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

This book would not have been possible without the support and encouragement of numerous scholars, colleagues, friends, and family members. I wish to thank my undergraduate and graduate professors for inspiring me to pursue a career in musicology and for awakening my interest in new music: George Barth, Karol Berger, Anna Maria Busse Berger, ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

At the time of his death, Ferruccio Busoni (1866–1924) was widely remembered as a pianist with legendary technique, but his activities as composer and author usually received only passing mention, while his role as a teacher was largely forgotten, except by his pupils.1 ...

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1. Unconventional Maestro

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pp. 11-44

As a teacher of composition, Busoni imparted his vision of great music to his students, even if he did not require the systematic completion of exercises to improve technical skill.1 When he did give practical musical advice, it was based on the music of the masters—especially the compositions of Johann Sebastian Bach and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. ...

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2. Janus-Faced Modernism

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pp. 45-88

Jean Sibelius (1865–1957) wrote in a style that has defied categorization. His predominantly tonal compositions seemed anachronistic in the early twentieth century.1 At the same time, scholars have increasingly recognized his play with texture, timbre, and form as innovative.2 ...

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3. New Instruments, New Sounds, and New Musical Law

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pp. 89-135

When Edgard Varèse (1883–1965) burst on the musical scene in America in December 1915, he held radical ideas about music that, as yet, were largely unrealized in his compositions. In his first newspaper interview after embarking in New York, he stated several of these ideas; they became his compositional and artistic credo: ...

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4. From Opera to Films

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pp. 136-188

When Louis Gruenberg (1884–1964) won the Flagler Prize (1920) in composition for his symphonic work The Hill of Dreams, op. 10, the career of one of America’s earliest nationalist composers was launched.1 He pioneered a distinctively American musical style through the melding of jazz and classical idioms in the 1920s, ...

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5. New Sonic Landscapes

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pp. 189-231

Although Otto Luening (1900–1996) created over 300 compositions in diverse styles, it is his electronic music that has been viewed as the most influential. He created the first piece using electronic tape and the first piece for electronic tape and live performers in the United States.1 ...

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6. New Music of the Weimar Republic

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pp. 232-276

Philipp Jarnach (1892–1982) was viewed as one of the most important young composers in Germany during the 1920s and early 1930s. In 1922, a reviewer stated: “Not merely hope, but already a fulfillment, Philipp Jarnach is for us one of the most pronounced leading figures of the young generation.”1 A performance of Jarnach’s String Quintet, ...

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7. Conclusions: “Passing the Torch”

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pp. 277-340

As a composition teacher, Ferruccio Busoni sought to reveal new musical vistas to his students.1 His pedagogical strategy consisted mainly of inspiring his disciples with new ideas. He dialogued and critiqued; he talked about literature, art, history, philology, and music, but he did not focus on specific methodologies or techniques. ...

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 341-358

Index

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pp. 359-372

About the Author

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