In this Book

On What Cannot Be Said
summary
Apophasis has become a major topic in the humanities, particularly in philosophy, religion, and literature. This monumental two-volume anthology gathers together most of the important historical works on apophaticism and illustrates the diverse trajectories of apophatic discourse in ancient, modern, and postmodern times. William Franke provides a major introductory essay on apophaticism at the beginning of each volume, and shorter introductions to each anthology selection. The second volume, Modern and Contemporary Transformations, contains texts by Hölderlin, Schelling, Kierkegaard, Dickinson, Rilke, Kafka, Rosenzweig, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Weil, Schoenberg, Adorno, Beckett, Celan, Levinas, Derrida, Marion, and more.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Epigraphs
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Preface: Apophasis as a Mode of Discourse
  2. pp. 1-8
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  1. Introduction: Modern and Contemporary Cycles of Apophasis
  2. pp. 9-50
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  1. Fragments and Finitude
  1. 1. Hölderlin (1770-1843)
  2. pp. 53-61
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  1. 2. Schelling (1775–1854)
  2. pp. 62-73
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  1. 3. Kierkegaard (1813–1855)
  2. pp. 74-83
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  1. 4. Dickinson (1830–1886)
  2. pp. 84-89
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  1. 5. Hofmannsthal (1874–1929)
  2. pp. 90-101
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  1. 6. Rilke (1875–1926)
  2. pp. 102-112
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  1. 7. Kafka (1883–1924)
  2. pp. 113-120
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  1. 8. Benjamine (1892–1940)
  2. pp. 121-136
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  1. New Apophatic Phiosophies
  1. 9. Rosenzweig (1887–1929)
  2. pp. 139-165
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  1. 10. Wittgenstein (1889–1951)
  2. pp. 166-179
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  1. 11. Heidegger (1889–1976)
  2. pp. 180-201
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  1. 12. Weil (1909–1943)
  2. pp. 202-208
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  1. Depicting, Composing, Representing Nothing
  1. 13. Malevich (1878–1935)
  2. pp. 211-245
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  1. 14. Schoenberg (1874–1951)
  2. pp. 246-259
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  1. 15. Adorno (1903–1969)
  2. pp. 260-270
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  1. 16. Cage (1912–1992)
  2. pp. 271-282
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  1. 17. Jankélévitch (1903–1985)
  2. pp. 283-307
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  1. 18. Beckett (1906–1989)
  2. pp. 308-322
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  1. 19. Steiner
  2. pp. 323-343
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  1. 20. Philip
  2. pp. 344-358
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  1. The Unutterably Other
  1. 21. Bataille (1897–1962)
  2. pp. 361-375
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  1. 22. Jabès (1912–1991)
  2. pp. 376-386
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  1. 23. Celan (1920–1970)
  2. pp. 387-405
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  1. 24. Levinas (1906–1995)
  2. pp. 406-426
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  1. 25. BLlanchot (1907–2003)
  2. pp. 427-442
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  1. 26. Derrida (1930–2004)
  2. pp. 443-459
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  1. 27. Marion
  2. pp. 460-476
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  1. Permissions and Acknowledgments
  2. pp. 477-480
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