Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

No book project is an individual effort. My fortunate dilemma is to be able to reflect on who has contributed to this scholarship and in what way. And, like so many similar projects, there are always more people to thank than there is room on the page or time in the day. First, this book would not have been possible had I not been selected to be a fellow of Framing the Global Research and Publication Project. This amazing project was supported by a seven-year initiative of Indiana University Press (IUP) and the Indiana University Center for the Study of Global Change and funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The project...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-28

On December 26, 2004, in the Northern Hemisphere we watched and witnessed the human devastation from a massive 9.0 magnitude earthquake centered off the western shores of Indonesia. The earthquake triggered a series of devastating tsunamis that inundated the coasts of fourteen countries along the rim of the Indian Ocean, killing nearly 230,000 people, injuring tens of thousands more, and displacing more than 10 million men, women, and children. The scale of the harm to life and damage to the local economy, infrastructure, and government was unprecedented. In the days that followed, the South Asian tsunami became a...

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1 I Am Here to Help

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pp. 29-65

I say anything I think. I don’t hide much,” admits Heather Meyer, the program advisor for the NGO Water for People, during a candid dinner conversation in Kigali. “I had for a while regular lunches with a group [of friends]. We used to call each other ‘the four,’ Water for People, Water for Life, Living Water International, and WaterAid. The four of us are white expatriates. We used to have lunch all the time and be able to talk openly...and sometimes it was absolutely hysterical. We had this conversation about sustainability, and one us, I think it was the person from Living Water International, was saying, ‘oh, our website is...

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2 Educating the Global Humanitarian Citizen

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pp. 66-89

In this chapter, we examine the impact and growth of a central meaning-producing institution within the global humanitarian assemblage: the education system. In particular, the rapid growth of institutions involved in humanitarian training and education not only has aided in the professionalization of the global learning experience but also has been integral to shaping the means and methods by which humanitarianism is practiced and understood. The rapid rise of volunteer and study-abroad programs has allowed more students to take advantage of cross-cultural learning experiences in an effort to influence career aspirations...

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3 The Business of Humanity and the Humanitarian Business

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pp. 90-112

Speaking before a crowded audience at the Framing the Global Conference at Indiana University, the plenary speaker, Yasmina Zaidman, director of communications and strategic partnerships for Acumen Fund, began by describing a vision of how Acumen “wants to bridge the gap between rich and poor in an interconnected world.” The idea of interconnectedness, Zaidman explained,

is not just about how economies rely on each other, for commodities, for labor, or for capital; it is about a more fundamental truth, that we have a shared destiny. That the challenges by those with the least of everything are all of our...

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4 Failure Is the F Word

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pp. 113-132

Standing on a well-lit TED (technology, entertainment, and design) Talk–like stage, Fraser Moore, a charismatic host and organizer, welcomes a cheering audience of 400 to “[another] year of failure.” Moore is referring to Fail Festival, an annual public event or, as Moore describes it, “a celebration,” where development practitioners and other “do-gooders” use a combination of satire, comedy, and musical parodies to share their latest experiences with one another about how their technological innovations, platforms, or other devices failed to perform according to their humanitarian plans. “Failure is the ‘f word’ of international...

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Conclusion: A Crime against Humanity

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pp. 133-146

On the eve of the blood moon lunar eclipse, Central Park in Manhattan was crammed with tens of thousands of enthusiastic millennials eager to express their solidarity with the world’s poor. At one particular moment in the early evening, Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder and recent phenom Beyoncé took center stage together. His acoustic guitar in his lap, Vedder began to strum the familiar introduction to musician and activist Bob Marley’s “Redemption Song.” Vedder passionately sang the introductory verse, and then Beyoncé, with the roaring crowds’ approval, led the next stanza of this iconic melody. As Vedder strummed...

Bibliography

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pp. 147-158

Index

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pp. 159-164

About the Author

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pp. 165-166