In this Book

Detroit 1967
summary
In the summer of 1967, Detroit experienced one of the worst racially charged civil disturbances in United States history. Years of frustration generated by entrenched and institutionalized racism boiled over late on a hot July night. In an event that has been called a "riot," "rebellion," "uprising," and "insurrection," thousands of African Americans took to the street for several days of looting, arson, and gunfire. Law enforcement was overwhelmed, and it wasn't until battle-tested federal troops arrived that the city returned to some semblance of normalcy. Fifty years later, native Detroiters cite this event as pivotal in the city's history, yet few completely understand what happened, why it happened, or how it continues to affect the city today. Discussions of the events are often rife with misinformation and myths, and seldom take place across racial lines. It is editor Joel Stone's intention with Detroit 1967: Origins, Impacts, Legacies to draw memories, facts, and analysis together to create a broader context for these conversations. In order to tell a more complete story, Detroit 1967 starts at the beginning with colonial slavery along the Detroit River and culminates with an examination of the state of race relations today and suggestions for the future. Readers are led down a timeline that features chapters discussing the critical role that unfree people played in establishing Detroit, the path that postwar manufacturers within the city were taking to the suburbs and eventually to other states, as well as the widely held untruth that all white people wanted to abandon Detroit after 1967. Twenty contributors, from journalists like Tim Kiska, Bill McGraw, and Desiree Cooper to historians like DeWitt S. Dykes, Danielle L. McGuire, and Kevin Boyle, have individually created a rich body of work on Detroit and race, that is compiled here in a well-rounded, accessible volume. Detroit 1967 aims to correct fallacies surrounding the events that took place and led up to the summer of 1967 in Detroit, and to encourage informed discussion around this topic. Readers of Detroit history and urban studies will be drawn to and enlightened by these powerful essays.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-viii
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  1. Foreword
  2. Thomas J. Sugrue
  3. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. Joel Stone
  3. pp. 1-10
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  1. Part I: A Checkered History
  2. pp. 11-12
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  1. Detroit’s Forgotten History of Slavery
  2. Bill McGraw
  3. pp. 13-22
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  1. The Underground Railroad and Early Racial Violence
  2. Roy E. Finkenbine
  3. pp. 23-30
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  1. Freedom’s Railway: Reminiscences of the Brave Old Days of the Famous Underground Line
  2. William Lambert
  3. pp. 31-32
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  1. Race Relations in Detroit, 1860–1915
  2. De Witt S. Dykes Jr.
  3. pp. 33-39
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  1. The Rages of Whiteness: Racism, Segregation, and the Making of Modern Detroit
  2. Kevin Boyle
  3. pp. 40-47
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  1. The Arsenal of Democracy-for-Some
  2. Charles K. Hyde
  3. pp. 48-53
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  1. Detroit 1943: “A Real Race Riot”
  2. Gregory Sumner
  3. pp. 54-59
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  1. A Streetcar Named Disaster
  2. Tommie M. Johnson
  3. pp. 60-62
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  1. Part II: A Deteriorating Situation
  2. pp. 63-64
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  1. The Deindustrialization of Detroit
  2. Thomas A. Klug
  3. pp. 65-75
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  1. Joe’s Record Shop
  2. Marsha Music
  3. pp. 76-81
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  1. Benefit of the Redoubt
  2. Jeffrey Horner
  3. pp. 82-93
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  1. Defending the Divide: Homeowners’ Associations and the Struggle for Integration in Detroit, 1940–1965
  2. William Winkel
  3. pp. 94-105
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  1. Liberals and “Get-Tough” Policing in Postwar Detroit
  2. Alex Elkins
  3. pp. 106-116
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  1. Part III: A Riot by Any Other Name
  2. pp. 117-118
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  1. Chronology of Events
  2. pp. 119-136
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  1. Steel Meets Flint: How to Start a Riot
  2. Joel Stone
  3. pp. 137-148
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  1. In the Center of the Storm
  2. Hubert G. Locke
  3. pp. 149-157
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  1. Rebellion, Revolution, or Riot: The Debate Continues
  2. Ken Coleman
  3. pp. 158-164
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  1. The Problem Was the Police
  2. Melba Joyce Boyd
  3. pp. 165-172
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  1. Murder at the Algiers Motel
  2. Danielle L. McGuire
  3. pp. 173-183
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  1. The Storytellers: Getting to the Heart of the Matter
  2. Timothy Kiska
  3. pp. 184-195
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  1. The Mayor’s Shadow
  2. Berl Falbaum
  3. pp. 196-198
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  1. The Taxi Driver
  2. Kathleen Kurta
  3. pp. 199-201
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  1. Oral History Excerpts
  2. pp. 202-210
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  1. Part IV: Out of the Ashes
  2. pp. 211-212
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  1. What the Children Said
  2. Steven Balkin
  3. pp. 213-217
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  1. And the Beat Goes On: Continued Confrontation
  2. Joel Stone
  3. pp. 218-229
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  1. First Time I’ve Ever Seen Justice
  2. Rev. Daniel W. Aldridge Jr.
  3. pp. 230-234
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  1. A Call to Action: The Changing Face of Inner-City Activism
  2. Joel Stone
  3. pp. 235-249
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  1. Black Power, Black Rebellion
  2. Betty DeRamus
  3. pp. 250-254
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  1. It Was a Good Time for Organizing
  2. Mike Hamlin
  3. pp. 255-259
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  1. In the Uprising’s Wake: Reaction in the White Community
  2. William Winkel
  3. pp. 260-270
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  1. Part V: The More Things Change . . .
  2. pp. 271-272
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  1. Detroit 1967 and Today: Spatial Racism and Ongoing Cycles of Oppression
  2. Peter J. Hammer
  3. pp. 273-282
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  1. Hindsight: The Shift in Media Framing
  2. Casandra E. Ulbrich
  3. pp. 283-289
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  1. It Can Happen Here: Model City Once Again?
  2. Desiree Cooper
  3. pp. 290-296
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 297-308
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 309-314
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 315-328
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