Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iii

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. iv-ix

read more

Preface and Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. x-xi

It does not take much exploration for one to easily discover the rich biodiversity that abounds in Alabama. With vast river and stream systems, varied geography and terrain, and a great range of habitat types with their associated flora and fauna, Alabama ranks as one of the most naturally diverse states in the nation. Determined to educate citizens and scientists to that wealth of life, the Alabama Department of Conservation...

Maps

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xii-xvi

read more

Fresh Water Snails (Gastropods) and Mussels (Bivalves)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-82

The previous assessment depicted Alabama’s freshwater mussel and snail diversity and high degree of endemism, highlighting its overall imperiled status. There has been little improvement with regard to rates of imperilment within these two groups and they remain among the most endangered on Earth. Their relatively sedentary habits, adaptation to clean free-flowing waters, and the linear nature of their habitats make them particularly vulnerable to the environmental...

read more

Crayfishes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 83-132

Crayfish, sometimes called “crawfish,” “crawdads,” or “mud bugs,” are a unique component of the aquatic biodiversity of Alabama. Crayfishes, in addition to the understudied freshwater shrimps, are arthropods of the subphylum Crustacea and order Decapoda and are relatively large, conspicuous invertebrates. Crayfish have been consumed by humans for centuries, and their use in traditional recipes indicates culinary and cultural value. Representing...

read more

Fishes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-190

Alabama’s fish diversity is found in its 77,242 miles of perennial and intermittent streams, 15 river systems, and the Mobile Delta. The number of freshwater fish species occurring in Alabama’s waters is typically reported as more than 300 (Smith-Vaniz 1968; Boschung 1992; Mettee et al. 1996; Boschung and Mayden 2004). In 2002, the Fish Committee considered 317 species that live exclusively in fresh water, invade fresh waters on a routine basis, or live...

read more

Amphibians and Reptiles

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-256

Alabama boasts a rich and diverse representation of amphibian and reptile species. Except for the salamanders, the state ranks at or near the top in species numbers for all the major herpetofaunal groupings throughout the Southeast.

During the 2012 Amphibian and Reptile Committee sessions, species were reviewed very much like they were at...

read more

Birds

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 257-316

A decade following the conclusion of the second Nongame Wildlife Conference in 2002, considerable progress has been made toward addressing the conservation needs of birds identified as Greatest Conservation Need (GCN) in Alabama. Initially, the decisions made at the second conference provided many of the priorities and objectives used to develop Alabama’s Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy (CWCS) in 2005. This U.S. Fish and...

read more

Mammals

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 317-344

Any checklist or number of Alabama’s mammals will be somewhat subjective depending upon criteria used for listing. Indeed, what defines a native Alabama mammal? For instance, should a comprehensive list include extirpated or extinct species? Should marine mammals regularly seen off Alabama’s coasts be included? Wild-dwelling exotic or accidental species? Should humans—particularly native Paleo-Americans, arguably a...

Glossary of Terms

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 345-354

About the Editor

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 355