In this Book

summary

To understand how Albert Einstein’s pacifist and internationalist thought matured from a youthful inclination to pragmatic initiatives and savvy insights, Holmes gives readers access to Einstein in his own words. Through his private writings, she shows how Einstein’s thoughts and feelings in response to the war evolved from horrified disbelief, to ironic alienation from both the war’s violence and patriotic support for it by the German people, to a kind of bleak endurance. Meanwhile, his outward responses progressed, from supporting initiatives of other pacifists, to developing his own philosophy of a postwar order, to being the impetus behind initiatives.

In the beginning of the postwar period, Einstein’s writing reflected an optimism about Germany’s new Weimar Republic and trust in the laudatory effects of military defeat and economic hardship on the German people. He clearly supported the principles in US President Woodrow Wilson’s "Fourteen Points" speech. Yet Einstein’s enthusiasm diminished as he became disappointed in the early Weimar Republic’s leaders and as his aversion to the culture of violence developing in Germany grew. He also felt offended at the betrayal of Wilson’s principles in the Treaty of Versailles. Drawing upon personal correspondence and public proclamations, Holmes offers an intimate and nuanced exploration of the pacifist thought of one of our greatest intellectuals.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. xv-xxiv
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  1. 1 Horror at War, Pacifist Affiliation, and Alienation from Colleagues 1914–1915
  2. pp. 1-28
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  1. 2 Disgust with War, Pessimism, and International Organization 1916–1917
  2. pp. 29-53
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  1. 3 Hope and Optimism beyond the Turbulence of Defeatand Revolution 1918
  2. pp. 54-78
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  1. 4 Uprisings, Paris Peace Conference, Treaty of Versailles, and the Publication of Lille 1919
  2. pp. 79-117
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  1. 5 Economic Crisis, Reactionary Politics, and Ongoing Engagement 1920–1921
  2. pp. 133-160
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  1. 6 Social Justice Advocacy for Jews, and Confident Jewish Identity 1914–1921
  2. pp. 161-186
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  1. Epilogue. Pacifist Stances and Professed Identity through 1955
  2. pp. 187-200
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  1. Appendixes, Notes, Bibliography, Index
  1. Appendix A. German-Language Text of the Manifesto “To the Civilized World” (“An die Kulturwelt!”)
  2. pp. 203-208
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  1. Appendix B. German-Language Text of the “Appeal to the Europeans” (“Aufruf an die Europäer”)
  2. pp. 209-212
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  1. Appendix C. “Fourteen Points”: United States President Woodrow Wilson, January 8, 1918
  2. pp. 213-216
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 217-290
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 291-310
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 311-332
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  1. About the Author
  2. pp. 333-334
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  1. Image Plates
  2. pp. 118-132
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  1. Back Cover
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780815653608
Print ISBN
9780815610854
MARC Record
OCLC
987909803
Launched on MUSE
2017-06-07
Language
English
Open Access
N
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