Cover

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Frontispiece, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-8

Contents

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pp. 9-12

Part I

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1. Sources

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pp. 15-26

Students of the Spanish comedia have been puzzled, perhaps, by the surprising lack of analytical attention devoted to one of Lope de Vega's most arresting plays, El Caballero de Olmedo.1 This paucity of critical activity has been all the more mystifying...

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2. Courtly Love

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pp. 27-50

Francisco de Borja's version of the story of the Gentleman of Olmedo is of capital interest. In stanza six the poet remarks that the hero is singing some verses from the cancioneros on his way to the celebration in Medina. More arresting still is the revelation...

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3. Alcahuetería and Brujería

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pp. 51-82

The anatomy of tragedy is predicated on an ontological dualism expressed in various styles as an irony. The peculiar achievement of the tragic disposition of events presents the spectator a metaphysical reconciliation of human autonomy with the grand design...

Part II

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Act I

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pp. 85-99

Alonso's opening soliloquy, like the first scene as a whole, is strikingly similar to the initial moments of the Celestina. Traditionally, the hero is seen on stage decrying the fact that don Amor (ciego dios [793-b.]), without warning, has entered his house. "De...

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Act II

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pp. 100-124

The morphology of Act II can be divided into five major scenes as follows: Scene one, Alonso, Tello, Pedro, Inés; Scene two, Fernando, Rodrigo; Scene three, the "charade scene," Inés, Tello, Fabia, Leonor, Pedro; Scene four, el Rey Juan II, Alvaro de Luna...

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Act III

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pp. 125-176

The morphology of Act III is divided into three principal dramatic moments. The first is constructed around the bullring and the activities presented there. The second section takes place after the celebration. It is composed of two parts: the love scene...

Bibliography

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pp. 177-182

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A Note to the Second Printing

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pp. 183-187

The first printing of my study, The Goldfinch and the Hawk, appeared in late 1966.1 wish to acknowledge my gratitude to those students of the comedia whose continuing demand for my essay has prompted a supplementary release. I am indebted to the Editorial Board of the University...