Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-viii

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I. Zola, Master of Naturalism

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pp. 1-29

Zola was the first to apply the term naturalism to a literary system. Previously it had been purely a philosophical term, so it is important to know the history and implications of the word at the time that Zola chose it as a name for his literary system...

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II. Emilia Pardo Bazán

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pp. 30-41

Countess Emilia Pardo Bazán was born in 1851 in the Galician city of La Coruña. She was fortunate in having parents who were not only wealthy and aristocratic but also wise beyond measure in that they did not discourage the questioning curiosity...

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III. Pardo Bazán's Opinion of Zola

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pp. 42-72

Emile Zola had no use for Catholicism. To him it was something which the modern world had outgrown, a dead thing—even the symbol of death in its hatred of life. The Church of Saint Eustace, standing there in its gloom hard by the Central...

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IV. Six Novels in the Zola Formula

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pp. 73-129

While there are traces of Zola's influence to be found throughout the work of Emilia Pardo Bazán, certain titles stand out as particularly good examples of naturalism. They might be called the six experimental novels of Pardo Bazán...

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V. Other Parallels to Zola in Pardo Bazán

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pp. 130-144

I have analyzed the six most perfectly naturalistic novels that Pardo Bazán wrote. She published others which are partially naturalistic, and in practically all of them one may find at least traces of naturalism. But to analyze the degree of influence...

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VI. Conflicting Voices

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pp. 145-155

Few authors have elicited so much contradictory and on the whole erroneous comment as the Countess of Pardo Bazán. First, there are those who misunderstand and condemn naturalism in all its forms and hence condemn the Countess, too, for...

Notes

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pp. 156-168

Bibliography

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pp. 169-171