Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

Many friends and colleagues have played a part in the evolution of this book, providing inspiration, helpful criticism and guidance along the way. Thanks especially to: Jane Tynan, Emma Chambers, Lisa Tickner, Claudia Stein, Roger Cooter, Joanna Bourke, Sander Gilman, Gabriel...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-24

In 2006 the New York–based photographer Nina Berman was approached by People magazine to take photographs for a story about a U.S. Marine sergeant, Tyler Ziegel, who had been trapped in his burning truck after a suicide bomber attack on the Iraq-Syria border in December 2004. Ty...

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1. The Elusive Portrait

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pp. 25-54

The war in Afghanistan, “Operation Enduring Freedom,” was about to enter its seventh and most violent year yet. President Bush was planning the “quiet surge” that would see the total number of U.S. troops increase to over thirty-five thousand. Coalition deaths and serious injuries had...

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2. Aversion: A History

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pp. 55-80

Disfigurement and mutilation were ubiquitous on the battlefields of World War I, in military hospitals, convalescent homes, towns and villages: an estimated 60,500 British soldiers suffered head or eye injuries, and 41,000 men had one or more limbs amputated.2 At the specialist...

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3. Repairing War’s Ravages

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pp. 81-113

The Imperial War Museum houses some twenty-three hundred photographs by Horace Nicholls (1867–1941), most of them taken between July 1917 and November 1918.1 Although Nicholls had made his name as a photojournalist during the Boer War, his request to cover the western...

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4. Flesh Poems

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pp. 114-137

When I first saw Henry Tonks’s drawings of facially injured soldiers, I was struck by how difficult it would be to write about them.1 It’s not just that the subject matter is disturbing. From the disciplinary perspectives of both art history and medicine, they are perplexing images. Are they portraits...

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5. The Afterlife of Henry Lumley

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pp. 138-163

In 1997 the Hayward Gallery in London put on a touring exhibition called The Quick and the Dead: Artists and Anatomy. In the book accompanying the exhibition Ludmilla Jordanova reflected on the points of contact and dissonance between these two pursuits, art and anatomy: a...

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Conclusion

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pp. 164-170

One of the advantages of writing academic books is that one is rarely asked to provide a personal explanation for a research interest. This project has been different. When I say that I am working on the cultural history of disfigurement, people wonder why. Looking back on the slow...

Notes

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pp. 171-196

Works Cited

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pp. 197-206

Index

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pp. 207-214