In this Book

In the Name of Editorial Freedom
summary
At a time when daily print newspapers across the country are failing, the Michigan Daily continues to thrive. Completely operated by students of the University of Michigan, the paper was founded in 1890 and covers national and international news topics ranging from politics to sports to entertainment. The Daily has been a vital part of the college experience for countless UM students, none more so than those who staffed the paper as editors, writers, and photographers over the years. Many of these Daily alumni are now award-winning journalists who work for the premier news outlets in the world.
 
In the Name of Editorial Freedom, titled after the paper’s longstanding masthead, compiles original essays by some of the best-known Daily alumni about their time on staff. For example Dan Okrent, first public editor of the New York Times, discusses traveling with a cohort of Daily reporters to cover the explosive 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Rebecca Blumenstein, deputy editor-in-chief of the Wall Street Journal, and author Alan Paul talk about the intensity of the Daily newsroom and the lasting relationships it forged. Adam Schefter of ESPN recalls his awkward first story that nevertheless set him on the path to become the ultimate NFL insider. The essays of this book offer a glimpse, as activist Tom Hayden writes, at the Daily’s impressive role covering historic events and how those stories molded the lives of the students who reported them.

Search and browse the Bentley Historical Library's Michigan Daily Archive, https://digital.bentley.umich.edu/midaily. The free online archive contains stories from 23,000 issues published between 1891 and 2014.
 
"They say a newspaper is a daily miracle. If that’s so, The Michigan Daily is something beyond that, with the whole operation run by a bunch of sleep-deprived 20-year olds. What could go wrong? Here, Daily alums share their mistakes freely, weaving their stories through a half-century of American history with wit and wisdom--much of it hard-earned--but also justifiable pride in their idealism, their dedication, and the seriousness of the work they did while mere undergraduates. For all they've accomplished since their Daily days, you get the feeling they’d trade it all for another year at 420 Maynard--and you understand why."
--John U. Bacon, bestselling author of Three and Out: Rich Rodriguez and the Michigan Wolverines in the Crucible of College Football and Endzone: The Rise, Fall, and Return of Michigan Football
 
“I cannot imagine a better way to celebrate 125 years of student journalism than the essays contained in this wonderful volume. Going back some 55 years, the authors, all of whom are successful in their craft, have fashioned for us a unique window into the lives of students at the University of Michigan. Their stories are powerful and remind us of the magic of this place where students both are challenged and challenge others daily to change the world for the better.”
—Mary Sue Coleman, President Emerita at the University of Michigan
 
“This book provides a truly wonderful collection of essays by alumni of the Michigan Daily, one of the nation’s leading college newspapers, concerning their experiences as students covering some of the most important moments in the history of our university, the nation, and the world. Since many of these Michigan Daily alumni have gone on to important careers in American journalism, their fascinating perspectives provide strong evidence of the educational power of such student extracurricular experiences.”
—James J. Duderstadt, President Emeritus at the University of Michigan

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Foreword
  2. Tom Hayden
  3. pp. xi-xviii
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  1. Introduction
  2. Stephanie Steinberg
  3. pp. 1-4
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  1. The Road to Selma
  2. Roger Rapoport
  3. pp. 5-11
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  1. f8 and Be There
  2. Andy Sacks
  3. pp. 12-15
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  1. Primary Sources: Capturing Kennedy in Detroit
  2. Jay Cassidy
  3. pp. 16-24
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  1. Lousy Student, Lousier Student Journalist
  2. Daniel Okrent
  3. pp. 25-27
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  1. 1969: The Year of Living Dangerously
  2. John Papanek
  3. pp. 28-38
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  1. “No Women” Was No Barrier
  2. Sara Krulwich
  3. pp. 39-41
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  1. The Day Paul Was Proclaimed Dead
  2. Leslie Wayne
  3. pp. 42-45
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  1. A Time for Tempo Heavy Condensed
  2. Sara Fitzgerald
  3. pp. 46-51
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  1. His Poetry, My Prose
  2. Laura Berman
  3. pp. 52-55
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  1. So Did You Know Bo?
  2. Bill Stieg
  3. pp. 56-63
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  1. The VA Nurses Trial: My Courtroom Education
  2. Keith B. Richburg
  3. pp. 64-70
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  1. The Daily Scoop That Did Not Shake Up D.C.
  2. Richard L. Berke
  3. pp. 71-73
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  1. Remember . . . Wally Teninga?
  2. Adam Schefter
  3. pp. 74-78
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  1. All’s Fair in Love and Elections
  2. Rebecca Blumenstein, Alan Paul
  3. pp. 79-82
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  1. From Critic to News Reporter
  2. Beth Fertig
  3. pp. 83-85
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  1. Unraveling an Internet Fantasy
  2. Josh White
  3. pp. 86-89
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  1. My Big House
  2. Joshua Rich
  3. pp. 90-92
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  1. Dude, I’m Going to Finish My Pizza
  2. Michael Rosenberg
  3. pp. 93-95
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  1. Football Player By Day, Photographer By Night
  2. Dhani Jones
  3. pp. 96-97
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  1. Dateline Beijing
  2. Margaret Myers
  3. pp. 98-101
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  1. Big Man, Big Impact
  2. Mark Snyder
  3. pp. 102-104
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  1. Aboard the Straight Talk Express
  2. Jeremy W. Peters
  3. pp. 105-107
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  1. 9/11: The View from the Daily
  2. Geoffrey Gagnon
  3. pp. 108-112
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  1. Covering a University on Trial
  2. Shannon Pettypiece
  3. pp. 113-115
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  1. The Game That Never Occurred
  2. Chris Burke
  3. pp. 116-120
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  1. One Season, Two Receivers and Finding a Career in Journalism
  2. J. Brady McCollough
  3. pp. 121-126
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  1. “Liberating” Vandy Chairs
  2. Tony Ding
  3. pp. 127-129
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  1. Little Brother, Big Rivalry
  2. Scott Bell
  3. pp. 130-134
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  1. A Streak of Bad Daily Sports Luck
  2. Nicole Auerbach
  3. pp. 135-137
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  1. Present at the Creation
  2. Andy Kroll
  3. pp. 138-142
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  1. Who Knows Best?
  2. Tim Rohan
  3. pp. 143-147
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  1. Cut to Michigan
  2. Andrew Lapin
  3. pp. 148-153
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  1. Expecting the Next Great Society
  2. Jillian Berman
  3. pp. 154-156
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  1. Chasing After Shoelace
  2. Ryan Kartje
  3. pp. 157-162
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  1. Close Up
  2. Chantel Jennings
  3. pp. 163-171
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  1. Searching for Reactions
  2. Chris Dzombak
  3. pp. 172-173
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  1. The Man in the Middle, and a Rookie Reporter’s Missteps
  2. Stephen J. Nesbitt
  3. pp. 174-179
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  1. 40 Years After Lennon Came to Town
  2. Joseph Lichterman
  3. pp. 180-184
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. 185-188
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