Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiii

I first became interested in the relationship between visual representation and philosophy as an undergraduate, when I studied Hans Holbein the Younger’s sketches for Erasmus’s The Praise of Folly in a seminar taught by Christia Mercer, whom it gives me great pleasure to thank for being such an inspiring teacher. To Jean Michel Massing, my enormously generous PhD supervisor at the University of Cambridge, I owe perhaps the greatest debt; I am grateful to him for his continual encouragement, humor, and extraordinary erudition. During my doctoral studies, I learned a great deal...

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiv-xvii

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-41

In 1619 Martin Meurisse (1584–1644), a Franciscan professor of philosophy at the Grand Couvent des Cordeliers in Paris, became embroiled in a debate with the Protestant pastor François Oyseau (1545–1625) about the significance of the rituals of the mass.1 In the course of this dialogue, Oyseau repeatedly criticized Meurisse’s use of engraved allegories for the teaching of philosophy. When Meurisse attacked Oyseau as a poor logician, Oyseau replied that the friar was not competent to judge his knowledge of logic because he was “a logician only in picturing and copperplate engraving.”2 Oyseau...

read more

1 Apin’s Cabinet of Printed Curiosities

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 42-75

At the cusp of the Enlightenment and toward the end of the early modern period, Siegmund Jacob Apin wrote a treatise on pedagogy titled Dissertatio de variis discendi methodis memoriae causa inventis earumque usu et abusu (Dissertation on various methods of learning, invented for the sake of memory, and on their use and abuse) that was first published in 1725 and then appeared in a revised and augmented edition in 1731. This work offers a helpful point of orientation for the first chapter of this book, since it provides a sort of synoptic view over diverse species of...

read more

2 Thinking through Plural Images of Logic

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 76-115

In September 1751 Jean-Baptiste Ludot (1703–1771), a lawyer and mathematician from Troyes, sent a six-page letter to Suite de la clef; ou journal historique sur les matières du tems describing an engraving that visualizes an Aristotelian system of logic in the form of a garden.1 From the introductory sentences onward, Ludot’s enthusiasm for the print is apparent:

Here, Monsieur, is a copy of a work, which through its extreme uniqueness may merit a place in your journal. One ought, as much as possible, to save chefs-d’œuvre from being forgotten, and this work is one.2...

read more

3 The Visible Order of Student Lecture Notebooks

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 116-147

Assessing the manuscript holdings of the BnF in 1874, the institution’s new general administrator Léopold Delisle (1826–1910) described with disfavor the collection of manuscripts from the Grand Couvent des Cordeliers (recall that Meurisse taught at this monastery), which the library had inherited after the Revolution:

The archival documents of the Cordeliers, composed of 151 manuscripts . . .
conserve barely the trace of the rich collection of manuscripts that must
have existed in this house between the thirteenth and fifteenth centuries. . . .
Wretched notebooks of students make up most of the archival materials.1...

read more

4 Visual Thinking in Logic Notebooks and Alba amicorum

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 148-173

How did images in manuscript sources serve as critical tools in the exploration of difficult theories for students, professors, and scholars? And how did the process of artistic creation become a mode of philosophical thinking? In this chapter, I demonstrate that lecture notebooks, as well as contemporaneous alba amicorum, incorporate visual materials as a mode of philosophical thought in itself. I am discussing the visual representations of lecture notebooks and friendship albums in the same chapter, as both these bound manuscript sources functioned as a locus in which...

read more

5 The Generation of Art as the Generation of Philosophy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 174-211

Visual representations and their technologies of production played a double role in early modern thought: they served as essential tools for the transmission of knowledge to the mind; and, at the same time, they also became dominant metaphors for understanding the activities of the mind. In other words, there was a two-way traffic between the production of visual instruments of knowledge, on the one hand, and understanding how knowledge arises, on the other. The study of the manner in which things are brought into existence engaged some of the best minds of the period. Hobbes...

Appendix 1 Catalogue of Surviving Impressions of Philosophical Plural Images

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 212-217

Appendix 2 Transcriptions of the Texts Inscribed onto Philosophical Plural Images

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 218-273

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 274-293

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 294-303

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 304-316

Illustration Credits

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 317-319