Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-viii

read more

1. Defining Arab Nationalism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-13

The men and women of the nationalist generation who had sought the political unity of the Arab people must have cast weary eyes at one another when they heard their acknowledged leader call a truce with those they considered to be anti-unionists...

read more

2. Early Stirrings: The Nineteenth andEarly Twentieth Centuries

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 14-48

The area that stretches from the Atlantic Coast in North Africa all the way east to the Persian Gulf in Asia, terminating at the frontiers of Farsi Iran to the east and Turkey to the north, and excluding Jewish Israel, is usually referred to by its inhabitants, as...

read more

3. Sati‘ al-Husri’s Theory of Arab Nationalism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-74

Sati‘ al-Husri was born in Yemen in 1882 into a Syrian Muslim family, but spent his formative years in Constantinople. He learned Turkish and French before he studied Arabic, and until the end of his life this intellectual prophet of Arab nationalism...

read more

4. Arab Nationalism andCompeting Loyalties: From the 1920s to the Arab Revolt in Palestine

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 75-106

In the two decades that followed World War I, the custodians of Arab nationalism gave much of themselves to propagate the idea among the Arabic-speaking people of the area. Their efforts did indeed bear fruit, for the message was slowly, yet determinedly...

read more

5. The Path to Nationalist Ascent: From the Palestinian Revolt to the Egyptian Revolution

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-134

While Arab nationalist concerns did not predominate in the 1930s, neither were they nonexistent. The majority of Syrians, wracked by their own divisions, did not see unity with Iraq or Egypt as a priority. But as we have seen, the Syrians were undoubtedly...

read more

6. Consolidating Arab Nationalism: The Emergence of “Arab” Egypt

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 135-159

When Gamal ‘Abd al-Nasir returned to Egypt after the fiasco of Palestine, his first thoughts were not on Arab nationalism; they were focused instead on Egypt—on the corruption of its political and social order, and on the continued dominance of the...

read more

7. Arab Nationalism on the March, 1955–1957

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 160-185

If specific events were to be picked as signposts in the spectacular forward march of Arab nationalism during the 1950s, the three that stand out are the 1955 Baghdad Pact, the 1956 Suez Crisis, and the birth of the United Arab Republic (UAR) in 1958. While...

read more

8. The Apex of Arab Nationalism: The United Arab Republic and the Iraqi Revolution, January–September 1958

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 186-213

The United Arab Republic (UAR), formed by the fusion of Egypt and Syria on February 1, 1958, came as a stunning surprise to most Arabs and non-Arabs. No one whose expectations were shaped by rational assessment could think that an organic unity...

read more

9. Arab Nationalism’s Downward Slide, 1958–1967

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 214-251

The announcement broadcast on Radio Baghdad on September 11, 1958 was curt, uncharacteristically devoid of the kind of hyperbole to which Iraqi listeners had become accustomed since the outset of the revolution. It said simply: “In view of the dictates...

read more

10. 1967 and After: The Twilight of Arab Nationalism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 252-281

The Six Day War of June 1967 is generally accepted as a seminal event in Arab contemporary history, but some analysts disagree with the contention that it also was Arab nationalism’s last stand. They argue that even after June 1967, “Arabism still shaped how...

read more

11. The Demise of Arab Nationalism: A Postmortem

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 282-313

It took some time for the light to finally go out on Arab nationalism, but the power generating it was turned off in June 1967. After the SixDay War, Arab nationalism’s slide toward political marginality became irreversible. And what stamped on it...

read more

12. Requiem for Arab Nationalism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 314-332

“A thousand years ago,” lamented the Economist in July 2014, “the various Arab caliphates were dynamic superpowers— beacons of learning, tolerance and trade. Yet today the Arabs are in a wretched state.”1 Surveying the region, the writers were struck...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 333-348

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 349-360