Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Figures

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pp. vii-2

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1. The Archaeology of Abundance

Monica L. Smith

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pp. 3-22

When excavating a site or surveying a region, archaeologists are often confronted with thousands or even hundreds of thousands of artifacts and ecofacts. Sometimes this is the result of deflation or other site formation processes that aggregate the remains of many periods onto a single landscape surface. In many cases, however...

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2. Rethinking the Impact of Abundance on the Rhythm of Bison Hunter Societies

María Nieves Zedeño

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pp. 23-44

In the northern Plains, bison hunter archaeology is about bone and stone; it generally lacks conventional indicators of abundance and economic differentiation, such as grave offerings, exotic or elaborate objects, or housewares other than food-processing tools. Yet careful scrutiny of the archaeological record through...

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3. Abundance in the Archaic: A Dwelling Perspective

Christopher R. Moore and Christopher W. Schmidt

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pp. 45-64

Archaic period studies in eastern North America typically address resource availability and abundance in environmental terms. Patches or ecotones are considered resource-rich if they exhibit a high diversity of available resources or relatively high yields of particularly productive resources (Brown 1985; Jefferies, Thompson, and...

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4. Water, Wind, Breath: Seeking Abundance in the Northern American Southwest

Mark D. Varien, James M. Potter, and Tito E. Naranjo

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pp. 65-94

The concept of scarcity has played a fundamental role in traditional economic theory (Robbins 1932; Smith 2012:29). Stated in its simplest terms, traditional theoretical perspectives view scarcity as inherent to human economic life because people are seen as having unlimited wants that cannot be satisfied as they live in a...

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5. Abundance in the Ancient Maya Village of Cerén?

Payson Sheets

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pp. 95-116

During the Classic period, ad 300–900, the Maya occupied southeastern Mexico and northwestern Central America and reached their maximum expansion into El Salvador during the middle of the period. Following the Ilopango eruption and the ecological recovery in El Salvador, people re-colonized the area (Dull, Southon...

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6. Savanna Products and Resource Abundance: Asking the Right Questions about Ancient Maya Trade and Urbanism

Traci Ardren

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pp. 117-138

Archaeological studies of ancient Maya trade have long acknowledged that the movement of products between different environmental zones was a cornerstone of Classic period economies. One of the most important circulations was between the long coastline of the Yucatan Peninsula and the many inland urban centers of...

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7. Abundant Exotics and Cavalier Crafting: Obsidian Use and Emerging Complexity in the Northern Lake Titicaca Basin

Elizabeth Klarich, Abigail Levine, and Carol Schultze

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pp. 139-164

During the Middle Formative (1300–500 bc) and Late Formative periods (500 bc–ad 300), Taraco and Pukara became major centers in the northern Lake Titicaca Basin of Peru. Recent research has revealed similar economic patterns for both sites that included the exploitation of vast trading networks through...

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8. Coping with Abundance: The Challenges of a Good Thing

Katheryn C. Twiss and Amy Bogaard

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pp. 165-180

Abundance may be a generally good thing, but in a delayed-return society with any pretense to egalitarianism it also brings myriad challenges. Individuals or groups who produce or acquire an abundance of resources must determine how to physically preserve and/or socially deploy that abundance while maintaining at least...

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9. Pottery: Abundance, Agency, and Choice

Justin St. P. Walsh

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pp. 181-200

So opens one of the most influential handbooks on the study of pottery in archaeology. Although ceramicists Clive Orton and Michael Hughes believe that pottery can be extremely useful evidence for archaeologists, they still felt the need to acknowledge the negative emotions that are often prompted by this category of artifacts...

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10. “Excessive Economies” and the Logics of Abundance: Genealogies of Wealth, Labor, and Social Power in Pre-Colonial Senegal

François G. Richard

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pp. 201-228

Elite control over property, production, economic surplus, and long-distance trade has been a central feature in archaeological scenarios of political complexity. Such was not always the case, however; in many parts of pre-colonial West Africa, where the widespread availability of land combined with relatively small, mobile populations...

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11. Production, Distribution, and Aesthetics: Abundance and Chinese Porcelain from Jingdezhen, AD 1350–1800

Stacey Pierson

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pp. 229-250

Chinese ceramics, particularly the porcelains consumed worldwide from the fourteenth century onward, are an ideal case study for an examination of abundance as an economic principle. In terms of the sheer quantity and distribution of surviving material, Chinese porcelains certainly embody the concept of “more than enough...

List of Contributors

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pp. 251-252

Index

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pp. 253-261