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The last few decades have seen an unprecedented surge of empirical and philosophical research into the evolutionary history of Homo sapiens, the origins of the mind/brain, and human culture. This research and its popular interpretations have sparked heated debates about the nature of human beings and how knowledge about humans from the sciences and humanities should be properly understood. The goal of Verbs, Bones, and Brains: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Human Nature is to engage these themes and present current debates, discussions, and discourse for a range of readers. The contributors bring the discussion to life with key experts outlining major concepts paired with cross-disciplinary commentaries in order to create a novel approach to thinking about, and with, human natures. The intent of the contributors to this volume is not to enter into or adjudicate complex philosophical issues of an epistemological or metaphysical nature. Instead, their common concern is to set aside the rigid distinctions between biology and culture that have made such discussions problematic. First, informing their approach is an acknowledgment of the widespread disagreement about such basic metaphysical and epistemological questions as the existence of God, the nature of scientific knowledge, and the existence of essences, among other topics. Second, they try to identify and explicate the assumptions that enter into their conceptualizations of human nature. Throughout, they emphasize the importance of seeking a convergence in our views on human nature, despite metaphysical disagreements. They caution that if convergence eludes us and a common ground cannot be found, this is itself a relevant result: it would reveal to us how deeply our questions about ourselves are connected to our basic metaphysical assumptions. Instead, their focus is on how the interdisciplinary and possibly transdisciplinary conversation can be enhanced in order to identify and develop a common ground on what constitutes human nature.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-viii
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  1. Introduction: The Many Faces of Human Nature
  2. Agustín Fuentes and Aku Visala
  3. pp. 1-26
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  1. 1. Off Human Nature
  2. Jonathan Marks
  3. pp. 27-40
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  1. Response I. On Your Marks ... Get Set, We’re Off Human Nature
  2. James M. Calcagno
  3. pp. 41-48
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  1. Response II. Rethinking Human Nature: Comments on Jonathan Marks’s Anti-Essentialism
  2. Phillip R. Sloan
  3. pp. 49-57
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  1. Response III. Off Human Nature and On Human Culture: The Importance of the Concept of Culture to Science and Society
  2. Robert Sussman and Linda Sussman
  3. pp. 58-70
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  1. 2. “To Human” Is a Verb
  2. Tim Ingold
  3. pp. 71-87
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  1. Response I. Free and Easy Wandering: Humans, Humane Education, and Designing in Harmony with the Nature of the Way
  2. Susan D. Blum
  3. pp. 88-95
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  1. Response II. On Human Natures: Anthropological and Jewish Musings
  2. Richard Sosis
  3. pp. 96-103
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  1. Response III. The Humanifying Adventure: A Response to Tim Ingold
  2. Markus Mühling
  3. pp. 104-113
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  1. Response IV. The Ontogenesis of Human Moral Becoming
  2. Darcia Narvaez
  3. pp. 114-122
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  1. 3. Recognizing the Complexity of Personhood: Complex Emergent Developmental Linguistic Relational Neurophysiologicalism
  2. Warren Brown and Brad D. Strawn
  3. pp. 123-139
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  1. Response I. “Self-Organizing Personhood” and Many Loose Ends
  2. Lluis Oviedo
  3. pp. 140-147
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  1. Response II. A Last Hurrah for Dualism?
  2. Kelly James Clark
  3. pp. 148-154
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  1. Response III. Why the Foundational Question about Human Nature Is Open and Empirical
  2. Carl Gillett
  3. pp. 155-164
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  1. 4. Human Origins and the Emergence of a Distinctively Human Imagination: Theology and the Archaeology of Personhood
  2. J. Wentzel van Huyssteen
  3. pp. 165-189
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  1. Response I. Constructing the Face, Creating the Collective: Neolithic Mediation of Personhood
  2. Ian Kuijt
  3. pp. 190-198
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  1. Response II. Imago Dei and the Glabrous Ape
  2. Douglas Hedley
  3. pp. 199-216
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  1. 5. What Is Human Nature For?
  2. Grant Ramsey
  3. pp. 217-230
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  1. Response I. The Difficulties of Forsaking Normativity
  2. Neil Arner
  3. pp. 231-239
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  1. Response II. Some Remarks on Human Nature and Naturalism
  2. Aku Visala
  3. pp. 240-247
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  1. Epilogues
  1. Putting Evolutionary Theory to Work in Investigating Human Nature(s)
  2. Agustín Fuentes
  3. pp. 248-259
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  1. Moving Us Forward?
  2. Celia Deane-Drummond
  3. pp. 260-272
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. 273-279
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 280-293
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780268101169
Related ISBN
9780268101145
MARC Record
OCLC
959610344
Pages
312
Launched on MUSE
2017-06-04
Language
English
Open Access
No
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