Title Page, Copyright page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

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Ch 1 - Introduction

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pp. 1-4

Workers’ compensation programs constitute the original example of public “social insurance” in the United States, dating to the early twentieth century. They also represent the first “no-fault” insurance programs, as they replaced tort liability through the courts as a way to cope with the growing incidence of injuries as America became industrialized. These state government programs specify medical and wage-loss benefits that must be provided by employers for their workers who become disabled by work-related injury or disease.1...

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Ch 2 - Benefit Adequacy and Equity

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pp. 5-30

Workers’ compensation programs for workers disabled by their work are the oldest social insurance programs in the United States and Canada. Issues of benefit adequacy and equity have been central to workers’ compensation systems from the start, at the beginning of the twentieth century.
The simplest way to assess the adequacy and equity of benefits is with reference to the statutory framework.1 What level of wage replacement is specified by statute? The most common index among...

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Ch 3 - The Challenge of Return to Work in Workers' Compensation Programs

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pp. 31-64

Among the many goals of workers’ compensation programs (prevention, compensation, rehabilitation, etc.), the most recent to emerge into public policy concern has been the goal of return to work (RTW), which can be regarded as the ultimate objective of medical care and rehabilitation services after disability resulting from an industrial injury or illness. One could argue that this is the best measure of the value of the social systems that deal with work-related disability—...

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Ch 4 - Workers' Compensation and Incentives for Preventing Injuries

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pp. 65-94

Work-related injuries and diseases are costly for both workers and firms. For workers, injuries can interfere with the ability to work, thus lowering current and future income.1 Work-related injuries are also associated with depression and anxiety (Asmundson et al. 1998; Dersh et al. 2002) and may lead to chronic pain. For firms, injuries to workers disrupt production schedules, increase labor costs, and have the potential to increase workers’ compensation costs. Injuries are also costly to firms if firms value their workers’ health and...

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Ch 5 - Conclusion

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pp. 95-104

In this final chapter, we will review some of our findings from earlier chapters, with a focus on what those findings tell us about workers’ compensation performance and policy issues. The previous chapters focus on three of the most critical issues in workers’ compensation policy: benefit adequacy, injury prevention, and return-to-work promotion. This concluding chapter provides our overview of the state of workers’ compensation programs on these dimensions in the early twenty-first century, after approximately 100 years of experience in most states and provinces....

References

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pp. 105-116

Authors

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pp. 117-118

Index

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pp. 119-128

About the Institute

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pp. 129-130