Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xvi

Academia puts a premium on scholarly work that is credited to a single author. In my experience, many support systems have to be present to enable the type of focus, time, and energy necessary to engage in any scholarly endeavor and this book is no exception. This book would not have...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-5

By December 20, 1860, Jefferson Davis had built an impressive resume. He had taken advantage of his family’s wealth and power to pursue an admirable career at West Point. He propelled himself into the national spotlight as a hero in the Mexican-American War. He used his national fame to...

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1. Decorum in Davis’s Resignation from the Senate

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pp. 6-23

With the flames of secession fanning throughout the South, Jefferson Davis found himself in a troubling situation. He was a senator from Mississippi who had risen to national prominence to become one of the central spokespersons for the South, but he was also an outspoken critic of the rash and...

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2. Civic Republicanism in Davis’s Inaugural Address

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pp. 24-43

On February 18, 1861, the Confederate States of America inaugurated Jefferson Davis as provisional president. Sworn in on the front portico of the state capitol in Montgomery, Alabama, in front of an estimated ten thousand people, Davis delivered the first official presidential address of...

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3. Amplification in Davis’s Defense of Conscription

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pp. 44-60

In Jefferson Davis’s inaugural address on February 18, 1861, he called for peaceful relations and free trade between the Confederacy and the Union. Less than two months later, at 4:30 a.m. on April 12, 1861, the prospects for peace vanished when forty-three Confederate guns opened fire on Fort...

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4. Conspiracy Rhetoric in Davis’s Response to the Emancipation Proclamation

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pp. 61-74

On January 1, 1863, Abraham Lincoln issued one of the best-known rhetorical artifacts of the Civil War. The Emancipation Proclamation—declaring that “all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United...

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5. Pragmatism and Desperation in Davis’s Push for Conditional Emancipation

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pp. 75-88

In the two years following Davis’s response to the Emancipation Proclamation, the Confederate States of America suffered major setbacks in its campaign for independence. Despite Davis’s controversial conscription policies, the Confederacy put 850,000 soldiers into the field compared...

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Conclusion

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pp. 89-94

Six months after Davis’s desperate call for conditional emancipation, the Confederacy was on the brink of losing its capital at Richmond, Virginia. By April 3, 1865, the Confederate government was on the move as Grant’s forces were poised to capture the city that had been at the center of the...

Notes

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pp. 95-108

Bibliography

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pp. 109-114

Index

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pp. 115-119