Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Frontispiece

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xvi

I first began thinking about the creative economy and urban life as intertwined themes for this book after a few years of working with artists, collectors, and other art scene makers in Dakar. By that time, Dakar’s lively art scene was not only inflected by the city’s urbanization, it was also increasingly involved in the processes of art world globalization. Fortuitous timing made these thematic axes appear salient. It was even more fortuitous to have so many interlocutors interested in sharing their perspectives about artists and the city’s...

read more

INTRODUCTION: Dakar’s Art World City

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-20

Within a few months of arriving for my first stay in Dakar in 1998, I had amassed an untidy stack of invitation cards to exhibition openings and other art events in various neighborhoods across the city. When I asked my new colleague Abdoulaye about these artistic events, he assured me that all of this was standard fare. “C’est normal,” he told me in a tone of casual elegance. “This is animation artistique in Dakar.” My response vacillated between intrigue and bewilderment. Animation artistique? Although it was not entirely clear to me at that moment, his pithy explanation offered something of a revelation. These events were more...

read more

CHAPTER 1. Making the City’s Scene: Visibility, Exhibition Culture, and Mediatization

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-56

With his trademark beret, small circular glasses, and pipe, Joe Ouakam is an artist who is seen. His presence in Dakar’s art scene is both unmistakable and ubiquitous. Ouakam ambles through downtown streets, reads at the café of the Institut Français, and publishes his opinions in Dakar’s newspapers. Attending both art events and political debates, Ouakam navigates the city with great finesse, accruing visibility and fashioning his persona as he moves. Ouakam is likely the most visible and widely recognizable artist in Dakar. “Joe is everywhere,” an article in AllAfrica.com summarized aptly.1 In fact, it is more likely...

read more

CHAPTER 2. Mapping the Dak’Art Biennale in Dakar

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 57-96

As the longest running forum in Africa dedicated to exhibiting the work of contemporary artists from the continent and its Diaspora, the Dak’Art Biennale is vital to Dakar’s art scene, its city, and an increasingly populated global landscape of biennales.1 In this chapter, I map the Biennale spatially to reveal its embedment in Dakar; and I map it historically and discursively to illustrate its engagement with the processes of art world globalization. The Dak’Art Biennale has grown out of Dakar’s art world culture and the exhibition practices explicated in chapter 1; at the same time, it is very much a product of the city’s histories, possibilities,...

read more

CHAPTER 3. A Place from Which to Speak: Artists’ Studios as Infrastructure of Opportunity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-134

We might think of artists’ studios primarily as spaces for making art, spaces where artists work in solitude with materials strewn across the floor and the din of tools emanating from behind closed doors. Despite the prevalence of this trope, the association of artists’ studios with origination and manufacture is only partially applicable to Dakar’s art world city.1 In addition to making art in their studios, artists in Dakar also use their studio space to display, store, and sell their art (see chapter 6). Most critical to my analysis in this chapter, artists use their studios to receive and dialogue with visitors, making the space simultaneously...

read more

CHAPTER 4. From Street to Studio: Sourcing the Materials for Art from Urban Life

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 135-174

Artists and artworks engaging with the material and visual registers of urban life are abundant in Dakar. One of the most ubiquitous artistic references to the city involves récupération, a category of expressive production that makes use of salvaged and reworked materials culled from the urban environment. The term “récupération” describes both the manner in which materials are acquired and the visual project that results from their reimagining. This category of artistic production emerged as a major trend in Dakar’s art scene in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when the materials of urban life—discarded metals, driftwood,...

read more

CHAPTER 5. Picturing the City

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-218

In April 2000, three young artists organized a group exhibition entitled “Démarches Urbaines” (Urban Steps) at the IFAN Museum (now the Musée Théodore Monod). Located on the Place Soweto in Dakar’s stately Plateau neighborhood, the museum’s spacious halls, verdant gardens, and historic significance made it the city’s premier exhibition venue at the time. The exhibition featured the work of Cheikh Ndiaye, Modou Dieng, and Mohammed “Mookie” Coulibaly, all recent graduates of the École des Arts. In keeping with Dakar’s art scene practices, the artists organized and subsidized every aspect of the exhibition....

read more

CHAPTER 6. Market Space and Urban Space: The Business of Selling Art in the City

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 219-260

The previous chapter concluded with a discussion of Fally Sene Sow’s mixedmedia collage on glass pictures of the city in relation to the internationalization of his artistic trajectory. Here I resume with a close reading of Sow’s KO sur la Route de Colobane (2011). Focusing on the Colobane market and its surrounding neighborhood, this artwork depicts the disorderly vehicle and pedestrian traffic on the market’s main thoroughfare. A skillful combination of cloth scraps, aluminum foil, and magazine decoupage portrays the traffic flow amid vending...

read more

EPILOGUE: Reflections on Dakar's Art World City: Infrastructures, Vision-Oriented Subjectivities, and Implications

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 261-266

Two months prior to Dak’Art’s twelfth edition in 2016, I was preparing to send this book to the press when I received an invitation to join “a specially invited delegation” to Dak’Art. This group of curators, historians, gallerists, and collectors was to participate in special events, private meetings, exhibitions, and other Dak’Art programming. Organized by a marketing and branding agency in conjunction with the Biennale, the invitation also promised a “full tour throughout Dakar and surrounding provinces for an African cultural experience inclusive of Gorée Island, a safari game reserve, traditional markets, and more.”1 I was...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 267-284

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 285-296

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 297-308

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 309-312