Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Quotation

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Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Foreword

Stanley O. Ikenberry

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pp. xi-xiv

The Urbana-Champaign campus of the University of Illinois is among the most beautiful and expansive of any university campus in America. It is an inspiring place with stories to tell. For generations students and faculty have walked the broad expanses of green and entered imposing architectural structures, many of which were created long ago. ...

Invitation to the Companion Web Site

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pp. xv-xvi

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Chapter 1. Prairie to Petascale: An Overview

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pp. 1-7

On the southwestern edge of the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University of Illinois, a two-story glass foyer glows blue against the dark night of Oak Street and St. Mary’s Road. The rear of the simple modern rectangular building is unbroken brick veneer and backs onto the campus mail and recycling centers and is a stone’s throw from the South Neil Street commercial corridor. ...

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Chapter 2. In the Beginning: Pre-1919

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pp. 8-20

Trouble with both producing and getting campus endorsement of decorative terra cotta panels above the second-story windows of the new building delayed its dedication for more than a year. But on a sparklingly clear day in February 1913 Lincoln Hall was dedicated, and the university’s dynamic president, Edmund Janes James (1904-1920), was thrilled. ...

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Chapter 3. Growth and Transformation: 1920-1933

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pp. 21-32

On a cool, wet Sunday in September 1919, hundreds of prospective students—many of them World War I veterans—left Champaign-Urbana after trudging through the rain-soaked streets in a fruitless search for lodging. Those who did find rooms were seen the next morning patiently waiting in a double line that stretched from the registrar’s office in University Hall north across tree-lined Green Street ...

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Chapter 4. Stability and Transition: 1934-1954

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pp. 33-45

A bitterly cold wind swept across Mount Hope Cemetery as the body of James McLaren White was laid to rest February 8, 1933. Admirers, including U of I president Harry Chase and his predecessor, David Kinley, turned out on a bright, zero-degree day to pay respect to the longtime campus supervising architect. Two of the men carrying White’s casket to the grave ...

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Chapter 5. Building Boom and Bust: 1955-1984

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pp. 46-63

On a summer evening in 1953 some of the university’s most powerful men gathered in architect Ambrose Richardson’s basement to view the architect’s model for the new Law School Building. Richardson, tall and poised, was a master salesman. Now, aided by his vivacious wife and a tray of cocktails, he theatrically removed the sheet covering the elaborate eighth-scale model ...

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Chapter 6. Plans, Partners, and Big Ideas: 1985-2015

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pp. 64-78

On a cool and overcast Saturday morning in the autumn of 1985, scientist-inventor-entrepreneur Arnold Orville Beckman stood at the front of the slightly shabby law school auditorium at the University of Illinois to accept thanks for his $40 million gift to the Urbana-Champaign campus. Nearby stood his wife of sixty years and partner in philanthropy, Mabel S. Meinzer Beckman. ...

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Chapter 7. The Neighborhood: Sleep, Eat, Pray

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pp. 79-105

The life of a young man drawn to the new Illinois Industrial University, an all-men’s school that opened in a single building in late winter 1868, was full of everything except fun. Not only did the university pioneers have to wear a cadet-gray uniform reminiscent of West Point—standing collar, single-breasted vest, dark-blue welt on the outside seams—...

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Chapter 8. Gifts and Givers: Donor Buildings

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pp. 106-165

Thomas J. Smith, Civil War hero, successful small-town lawyer, and wealthy landowner, leaned into the task at hand. He would write a memorial booklet about Tina, his beloved wife, whose dead body lay near him in the big Victorian house on University Avenue in Champaign, Illinois. It was 1903. ...

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Chapter 9. Icons

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pp. 166-206

A campus is a community of scholars, a collection of buildings, and an organized landscape. It is a place with purpose.
Professors impart knowledge—which changes, inexorably, by new discovery or interpretation—to successive waves of students. Researchers explore and shape the natural and manmade universe ...

Sources

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pp. 207-224

Index

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pp. 225-232

About the Authors

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