Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Foreword

Jace Weaver

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pp. xi-xiv

Conferences are both the boon and bane of an academic’s existence. The annual meetings of professional associations are a time to connect with friends and colleagues you see far too rarely. And while you enjoy the host city, you also hope that you’ll hear at least one fresh and exciting paper or discover an emerging scholar of whom you were previously unaware. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvi

The editor would like to thank Sidonie Smith and the University of Michigan’s Institute for the Humanities for supporting production of this book. Thanks as well to the graduate students who helped organize and orchestrate the 2013 University of Michigan symposium, Globalizing the Word: Transnationalism and the Making of Native American Literature, ...

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Introduction: Globalizing the Word

Scott Richard Lyons

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pp. 1-16

The occasion for this book’s production was a symposium held in May 2013 at the University of Michigan entitled Globalizing the Word: Transnationalism and the Making of Native American Literature. The essays that resulted from that event—the chapters in this book—examine Native American texts, authors, movements, images, theories, and critical debates ...

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Chapter 1. Empire Treasons: White Earth and the Great War

Gerald Vizenor

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pp. 17-48

John Clement Beaulieu, my granduncle, was a soldier in the Fifty-fifth Engineer Regiment of the American Expeditionary Forces in France. He constructed roads and bridges under heavy enemy fire, and forty years later he told me stories about the lovely women he got to know during the Great War. Clement hardly ever mentioned fear, mortal combat, or the Germans. ...

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Chapter 2. Native American Literary Criticism in Global Context

Arnold Krupat

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pp. 49-102

Criticism of Native American literature is presently at a point where a recently dominant nationalist perspective and a newly prominent transnationalist perspective have encountered each other somewhat uneasily. Also emerging more fully is what has been called a “trans-indigenist” approach, a comparative version of the perspective I many years ago called “indigenist.”1 ...

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Chapter 3. “Between Friends and Enemies”: Moving Books and Locating Native Critique in Early Colonial America

Matt Cohen

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pp. 103-128

In the midst of King Philip’s War, in the late seventeenth century, an imaginative Algonquian warrior cut open the English settler Goodman Wright’s body and stuffed a Bible into him. Perhaps it is perverse of me to think of this as an act of literary criticism. But at the least, something important was communicated, however gruesomely, in this act. ...

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Chapter 4. “The Search Engine”: Traversing the Local and the Global in the Native Archive

Phillip H. Round

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pp. 129-142

Sherman Alexie’s “The Search Engine,” a short story from Ten Little Indians, originally published in 2004, touches on several of Alexie’s favorite themes, including the corrosive effects of nostalgia, and how tradition and kinship contort under the pressure of Eurowestern secularism and “progress.” ...

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Chapter 5. Migrations to Modernity: The Many Voices of George Copway’s Running Sketches of Men and Places, in England, France, Germany, Belgium, and Scotland.

Scott Richard Lyons

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pp. 143-182

The first Indian whom history records traveling across the Atlantic to Europe was a Taino remembered today only by his given Spanish name, Diego Colón. One of seven natives seized and brought to Spain by Christopher Columbus in order that they might, as memorably stated in the admiral’s diary, “learn to speak,” ...

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Chapter 6. Emerging from the Background: Photographic Conventions, Stereotypes, and the Ordinariness of the Indian

Kate Flint

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pp. 183-214

In 2008, artist Thom Ross created an installation on Ocean Beach, San Francisco. A hundred plywood Indians, life-sized but two dimensional, sat on their horses in the same spot on the sands that William Cody had posed with members of his Wild West troop in 1902. This was not Ross’s first installation featuring Indians. ...

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Chapter 7. Reading Global Indigenous Resistance in Simon Ortiz’s Fight Back

Eric Cheyfitz

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pp. 215-238

Simon Ortiz’s Fight Back: For the Sake of the People; For the Sake of the Land was originally published in 1980 and “was written,” as the Preface by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz tells us, “for the Tricentennial celebration of the 1680 [Pueblo] Revolt, and reminds us that the Revolt left a legacy of [Indigenous] resistance. Resistance continues in the mines, in the fields, ...

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Chapter 8. Productive Tensions: Trans/national, Trans-/Indigenous

Chadwick Allen

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pp. 239-256

How might our practices for reading, contextualization, interpretation, understanding, appreciation, even enjoyment of Native American literatures be affected by related but differently focused rubrics, heuristics, and narratives of the transnational—which centers the modern nation-state, its attributes, its agents, ...

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Chapter 9. “The Right to Enjoy All Human Rights”: The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Potential for Decolonial Cosmopolitanism

Elvira Pulitano

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pp. 257-282

These words, pronounced by Mick Gooda, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, testify to the significance that the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, adopted by the General Assembly on September 13, 2007, has come to embody for Indigenous communities worldwide.1 ...

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Afterword

Shari M. Huhndorf

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pp. 283-296

Why must scholars of indigenous cultures, histories, and politics attend to the global, to the social dynamics that situate Native peoples beyond the boundaries of tribe and colonial nation-state? In what ways do global contexts illuminate the historical and contemporary situations of indigenous people? ...

Contributors

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pp. 297-300

Index

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pp. 301-330

Back Cover

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