Cover

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Half Title, Further Series Titles, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Acknowledgements

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pp. vii-vii

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Series Editors’ Preface

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pp. ix-x

Moving the publication of the Companions to Scottish Literature series, under the revised title of International Companions, to Scottish Literature International, the academic imprint of the Association for Scottish Literary Studies, has had several benefits. One major advantage has been the ability of the new publisher to be open to adding titles to the originally proposed list of Companion volumes ...

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A Brief Biography of John Galt

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pp. xi-xii

John Galt was born on 2 May 1779 at Irvine in Ayrshire, the son of a ship’s captain involved in trade to the West Indies. Sickly as a child, Galt was at first schooled at home, and later attended grammar school at Irvine. In 1789, the family moved to Greenock in Renfrewshire when Galt’s father became a shipowner and in 1796 Galt began work as a clerk for a local firm. ...

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Introduction

Gerard Carruthers, Colin Kidd

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pp. 1-7

John Galt’s standing as an author has waxed and waned. There is nothing unusual about this. The course of literary reputations is as quirky as a game of Snakes and Ladders, and Galt’s trajectory is no exception. More surprising perhaps is the recognition Galt enjoys in the top tier of ‘Scottish Romantic literature’, for Galt is the least romantic of authors.1 ...

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1. John Galt’s Ayrshire

Andrew O’Hagan

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pp. 8-14

Overlooking the graveyard in Greenock where John Galt is buried, there is now a sheltered housing block named after him. Its residents remember the Renfrewshire town as it used to be, but they also feel remembered by the town itself, as if ‘Greenock’ was fully personified, not just a collection of buildings and bus stops and alleyways and drains, but an organism of history with a powerful memory of its own. ...

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2. Satire, Hypocrisy, and the Ayrshire–Renfrewshire Enlightenment

Colin Kidd

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pp. 15-33

The fiction of John Galt lives. The observation might seem gratuitous, if not redundant, except this is not the case with Galt’s close contemporary Walter Scott. With every passing generation in the anglophone world, Scott’s Waverley Novels become – it seems – that much harder to appreciate. For Scott’s sedate narrative tempo is not that of the modern world, ...

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3. Finding Galt in Glasgow

Craig Lamont

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pp. 34-43

In 1834, John Galt said: ‘Although Irvine was my birthplace, and Greenock the town of my adoption, yet I have ever regarded my obligations to Glasgow as paramount to those due to every other place.’1 Those familiar with Galt’s oeuvre will know that Glasgow was one of his regular settings. His shrewd eye and sharp memory for the characters and topography of a place mark one of the most celebrated features of his oeuvre. ...

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4. Galt the Speculator: Sir Andrew Wylie, The Entail, and Lawrie Todd

Angela Esterhammer

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pp. 44-56

John Galt lived, worked, and wrote as a speculator in an age of speculation. His major fiction dates from the 1820s, a decade in which historians often locate a paradigm shift in economic behaviour.1 During this decade, stock markets in Britain experienced a severe boom-and-bust cycle brought about by a system of easy credit and rampant enthusiasm for speculative investments, ...

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5. How John Galt Wrote North America

Ian McGhee

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pp. 57-69

John Galt set sail from Falmouth in October 1826. He was bound for New York and then overland to Upper Canada where he was to take up his post as the Canada Company’s first commissioner. For Galt, this was not merely a job. He believed that this was his opportunity to make a lasting mark and to win renown as a community builder in a still unpolished jewel of the British Empire. ...

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6. Commemorating the Covenanters in Ringan Gilhaize

Alison Lumsden

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pp. 70-81

It is a critical commonplace to recognise that John Galt’s Ringan Gilhaize was written in response to Walter Scott’s tale of the Covenanting Wars, Old Mortality. The controversy that Scott’s novel caused is well known. While popular with the public it met with an angry response from the Seceder minister Thomas McCrie, who berated it for its ‘partiality to the persecutors’ ...

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7. The Insider’s Eye in the Age of Improvement, Urbanisation, and Revolution

Christopher A. Whatley

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pp. 82-97

The more I read John Galt the more I become even more convinced than I was in 1979 that Galt has been shamefully neglected in Scotland.2 Galt is worth reading and celebrating as a major Scottish writer. From the historian’s perspective he is one of the most perceptive observers of Scottish society during the golden age of Scottish literary production. ...

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8. Pioneering the Political Novel in English

Gordon Millar

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pp. 98-109

Writers on political fiction have not been helpful in establishing Galt’s reputation. Christopher Harvie is an exception and comes close to paying appropriate tribute to Galt when he describes The Member (1832) as ‘the first political novel tout court.’1 The Provost (1822) he sees imprecisely as ‘set in more debatable land’. Galt is, in fact, vital to any discussion of political fiction ...

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9. Reading for Something Other than the Plot in Galt’s ‘Tales of the West’

Anthony Jarrells

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pp. 110-124

Although John Galt is perhaps best remembered for his fictional account of a Scottish country minister in Annals of the Parish (1821), it was two previously published works, both of them also about regional communities in the west of Scotland, that established Galt as a first-rate writer of Scottish stories – a peer, some thought, to the great Walter Scott. ...

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10. Gender and the Short Story in the Twilight Years

Gerard Carruthers

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pp. 125-136

By the 1830s, the short story was emerging in recognisably modern form. In Scotland, as elsewhere, novelists such as John Galt and James Hogg were turning their hands to shorter, more episodic fiction often with a focus on exotic subject-matter garnered from either home or abroad. Along with Galt and Hogg, Walter Scott is one of the three main figures ...

Endnotes

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pp. 137-164

Further Reading

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pp. 165-170

Notes on Contributors

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pp. 171-172

Index

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pp. 173-180

Back cover

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