Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Series Foreword

Robert Gottlieb

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pp. ix-x

Big Hunger is the twelfth book in the Food, Health, and the Environment series. The series explores the global and local dimensions of food systems and the issues of access; social, environmental, and food justice; and community well-being. Books in the series focus on how and where food is...

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Foreword

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pp. xi-xiv

This book could not be coming out at a more important moment in our history. We as a nation are facing the greatest income inequality since the Gilded Age. The lowest-wage sectors of our economy are the fastest growing, with incredibly dangerous portent for the viability of our gross domestic...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvi

This book draws from the writings of Janet Poppendieck, Mark Winne, Graham Riches, and Nick Saul. Sharon Thornberry played a key role as a sounding board throughout the project. In particular, pertaining to the beginning of the research process, I owe a debt of gratitude to Ellen Parker for her...

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Introduction: Lost Opportunities and Collateral Damage

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pp. 1-10

In 1958 Youngstown, Ohio was a thriving city, its vibrant economy fueled by steel. Located halfway between Chicago and New York City—and between Cleveland and Pittsburgh as well—it occupied a central place in America’s industrial heartland. Youngstown’s population hit its apex...

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1. Occupy Hunger

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pp. 11-40

Boston’s spring rains finally gave way to sunny skies and mild temperatures on Sunday May 5, 2013, for the Walk for Hunger, Project Bread’s 45th annual fundraising event. Starting at the Boston Common, the nation’s oldest park, approximately 30,000 persons participated that day. Such a...

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2. The Charity Trap

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pp. 41-76

From the second floor observation deck of the Greater Boston Food Bank (GBFB), you can see the machinery of the warehouse hum along. Forklifts move pallets, placing them on industrial strength shelving 35-feet high. Vans and trucks from food pantries across the region pull into the loading...

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3. The Politics of Corporate Giving

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pp. 77-104

Standing in the U.S. Capitol building on May 12, 2010, Walmart vice chairman Eduardo Castro Wright made a stunning announcement. He pledged that his company would donate $2 billion in food and cash over a five-year period to “fight hunger in America.”1 Against the backdrop of a dozen or...

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4. SNAP’s Identity Crisis

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pp. 105-142

Around 2010 or so, the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health began to produce a prodigious array of research papers that laid the groundwork for how the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) could be transformed to improve the health of its recipients...

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5. Economic Democracy through Federal Food Programs

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pp. 143-184

On Janie Hipp’s first day as the senior advisor for tribal relations to USDA secretary Tom Vilsack, she met with 175 Indian leaders gathered at the White House for the 2010 Tribal Leaders Conference. Representatives from all 566 federally recognized tribal governments participated in this event...

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6. Who’s at the Table Shapes What’s on the Agenda

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pp. 185-214

“We are the 99 percent!” Who is the 1 percent? Forty-seven percent of Americans pay no income tax. Slogans and declarations like these have become iconic symbols of America’s ever-widening economic inequality gulf. Book after book, blog after blog, and report after report have documented...

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7. Innovation within the Anti-Hunger Movement

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pp. 215-242

During the keynote session at the second Closing the Hunger Gap conference, held in September 2015, the Canadian Nick Saul (see “The Stop” case study below) urged the audience to put a cap on the amount of charitable food they distributed: “If you don’t put a lid on it, it will drown you. … To...

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8. Innovative Models from Outside the Anti-Hunger Field

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pp. 243-260

As anti-hunger groups begin to remake themselves, they often look for inspiration from other fields: community development, public health, planning, labor, and food systems, among others. This chapter examines four initiatives well-known among food and anti-hunger advocates. These...

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Conclusion: Toward a New Vision for the Anti-Hunger Movement

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pp. 261-272

Throughout the course of my career, when I have expressed dismay at the collateral damage caused by the emergency food system, the response has been swift and consistent, defending the integrity of food bank employees. My colleagues comment that food bankers are “good people trapped in...

Appendix 1: Primary National Anti-Hunger Groups in the United States

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pp. 273-274

Appendix 2: Trends in Prevalence Rates of Food Insecurity and Very Low Food Security in U.S. Households, 1995–2015

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pp. 275-276

Appendix 3: Index of Acronyms

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pp. 277-278

Notes

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pp. 279-326

Index

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pp. 327-343