Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

A book like this has a lot of moving parts and a long history. As early public talks were developed by colleagues into formal chapters, and then responses to the articles, and finally responses to the responses were crafted, the conversations kept evolving along the way, deepening and branching and coming back together. ...

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Prologue: Reading “America” Across and Against the Grain of Public Discourse

Jane C. Desmond

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pp. 1-4

Recent political events like the violent rise of ISIS (the so-called Islamic State), the war in Syria, continuing U.S. engagement in Afghanistan, U.S. participation in fighting the pandemic of Ebola in West Africa, Russian military interventions in Ukraine and their effects on U.S.-Europe relations, plans for strengthening the U.S.-India relationship as part of a wider strategy of Asian diplomacy, ...

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Introduction: The “American” Conundrum—Criticism, Attraction, and Antagonisms

Virginia R. Domínguez, Sophia Balakian

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pp. 5-28

This book is a daring collaborative effort.1 Colleagues outside the United States who have dedicated much of their lives to studying the States are often suspect in their home settings for being too sympathetic to the United States, too obsessed, or at least not critical enough of the United States. ...

Part I. Whose “America”? Whose “Anti-Americanism”?

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1. Internationalizing African American Studies, Too: White (West-) German Responses to the Civil Rights Movement

Sabine Broeck

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pp. 31-45

Editors’ Note: As this book was in production at the press, a series of egregious events in the United States unfolded, with police killings of several African American men, including Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Philando Castile in Minneapolis, Minnesota, among others. The day after Castile’s death, five Dallas, Texas, police officers were killed by snipers at a peaceful protest against police use of lethal force against black men. ...

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2. What We Talk about When We Talk about Anti-Americanism: An Italian Perspective

Giorgio Mariani

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pp. 46-60

The title of my essay is not only meant as a nod to writer Raymond Carver, who attended the world-famous writing workshop at the University of Iowa, and therefore as a symbolic way to express my gratitude to those who have been so kind as to invite me to take part in this symposium.1 There is a further reason for my title. Ever since, prompted by a set of historical and political circumstances, ...

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Second Look—Sabine Broeck on Giorgio Mariani

Sabine Broeck

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pp. 61-63

I hear a tone of exasperation and agony in your article, which has my empathy; I share your fed-up-ness with the constant replays and repetitions of tired, overused, and hypocritical discursive games between liberals and conservatives with respect to so-called anti-Americanism. Those games have been going on, as you so eloquently evoke, in all of Europe, with different foci and in modulations, ...

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Second Look—Giorgio Mariani on Sabine Broeck

Giorgio Mariani

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pp. 64-67

Of the several important points raised in Sabine Broeck’s essay, there are three that strike me as especially significant from my perspective as an Italian Americanist who very much shares her desire to resituate African American and, more generally, American Studies within an international framework. To begin with, I cannot help but notice the many similarities between, on the one hand, ...

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Third Look—Sophia Balakian on Mariani and Broeck—“Sticks and Stones: Discourses of Anti-Americanism as Name-Calling

Sophia Balakian

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pp. 68-70

Merriam-Webster defines “name-calling” as “the use of offensive names especially to win an argument or to induce rejection or condemnation (as of a person or project) without objective consideration of the facts.” It strikes me that Sabine Broeck and Giorgio Mariani have, implicitly and explicitly, framed discourses of anti-Americanism as a form of name-calling. ...

Part II. Histories of Engagements: Two Case Studies Looking at Domestic Consumption and Their Contexts

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3. Americanization and Anti-Americanism in Poland: A Case Study, 1945–2006

Kate Delaney, Andrzej Antoszek

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pp. 73-91

The topic of American exceptionalism has long been debated, but a case can also be made for Polish exceptionalism. Certainly with regard to both Americanization and anti-Americanism, Poland has followed a path that differs from that of other European nations—both East and West. These differences can be observed in both the Cold War and post–Cold War eras (1945–1989 and 1989–present); ...

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4. Americanization and Anti-American Attitudes in South Africa and Georgia: A Historical Snapshot from 2005

Loes Nas

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pp. 92-102

Let me start out with a disclaimer: being a native from the Netherlands, I can claim to be only a “hands-on expert” of South Africa and the country of Georgia, part of the former Soviet Union. I happened to have lived in both countries for a considerable period of time, fifteen years in South Africa and three and a half years off and on in Georgia. ...

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Second Look—Loes Nas on Kate Delaney and Andrzej Antoszek

Loes Nas

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pp. 103-104

In the essay “Americanization and Anti-Americanism in Poland: A Case Study, 1945–2006,” which I was asked to respond to, I found a lot of echoes, including those of personal experiences having lived off and on in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, between 2002 and 2005. Although they are very different countries, Poland and Georgia were nevertheless both subjected to an overlapping Soviet sphere of influence. ...

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Second Look—Sophia Balakian on Loes Nas

Sophia Balakian

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pp. 105-108

In her essay “Americanization and Anti-American Attitudes in South Africa and Georgia,” Loes Nas charts two newly democratic countries’ opposing trajectories in their sentiments and policies regarding “the West” and the United States more specifically. Nas envisions these trajectories as two lines forming an “X” of pro- and anti-U.S. attitudes as these countries moved from apartheid and Soviet communism, respectively, to democracy. ...

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Third Look—Jane C. Desmond on Delaney & Antoszek and Nas—“Reversing the Vectors of Analysis: Calibrating the ‘Use Value’ of Discourses of ‘Americanism,’ ‘Americanization,’ and ‘Anti-Americanism’”

Jane C. Desmond

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pp. 109-112

By this point in the book, it is clear that our objects of investigation are discursive constructs and the conditions of their emergence, sustenance, and overturning, or opposition in particular geopolitical contexts and historical periods. The inadequacy of the terms “Americanization” and “anti-Americanism” has been established, and the capaciousness of their referents has been pointed out. ...

Part III. Debating the Terms of Debate

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5. Kefaya and the New Politics of Anti-Americanism

Manar Shorbagy

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pp. 115-130

“What we’re seeing here . . . is the birth pangs of a new Middle East,” Condoleezza Rice callously said in describing the full-scale attack on Lebanon two days before setting foot in the Middle East. The disproportionate Israeli attack on Lebanon in July 2006, in response to the Hezbollah kidnapping of two Israeli soldiers, killed hundreds of civilians, misplaced hundreds of thousands of others, ...

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6. Understanding Anti-Americanism in Central Asia

Edward Schatz

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pp. 131-151

To decry the introduction of moral impurities is a strategy that boundary keepers routinely use (Douglas). But how one understands the sources of these impurities is never simple. To whom and to what processes does one assign responsibility for moral degradation? The changes introduced in Uzbekistan that challenged the “chastity of its women” ...

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Second Look—Manar Shorbagy on Edward Schatz

Manar Shorbagy

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pp. 152-154

Edward Schatz’s essay contributes to our understanding of anti-Americanism, especially in its relationship to Islamist activism. My goal in this commentary is to introduce some points for critical reflection by putting the relationship between anti-Americanism and Islamist activism in a broader context. ...

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Second Look—Edward Schatz on Manar Shorbagy

Edward Schatz

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pp. 155-156

In her contribution, Manar Shorbagy tells two stories about the Egyptian political movement Kefaya. The first is a story of Kefaya’s rise, which weaves together strands of domestic and international politics, emphasizing the generation of leadership that came to political consciousness when Nasserism failed to make good on its promise of defending Egypt against Western encroachments. ...

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Third Look—Seyed Mohammad Marandi on Schatz and Shorbagy—“What Is Anti-Americanism?”

Seyed Mohammad Marandi

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pp. 157-160

As I was watching the bombing of Baghdad live on television, someone was enthusiastically explaining how “smart bombs” were being used by the Americans for “surgical strikes.” I remembered how just over a decade before I heard almost the same words as I listened to the BBC World Service early in 1991. On both occasions I was in shock and awe as I watched, heard, and read American (and British) ...

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Third Look—Ira Dworkin on Schatz and Shorbagy—“Thinking Outside of America: The State, the Street, and Civil Society”

Ira Dworkin

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pp. 161-166

In her essay describing Egypt before the revolution of January–February 2011, Manar Shorbagy writes a rich history of Kefaya, a major activist coalition that came together during the final years of the reign of President Hosni Mubarak. Shorbagy usefully points to some of the political alliances, often unlikely and sometimes fleeting, that resulted in the overthrow of Mubarak. ...

Part IV. Visual Engagements and Their Interpretations

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7. Lost and Found in Translation: Problems of Cultural Translation in Hungary after 1989

Zsófia Bán

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pp. 169-177

Unfamiliar cities make you acutely aware of the advantages or shortcomings of your own. In Boston, whenever I take the subway at Porter Square, the station closest to where I live, I’m always filled with a kind of hopeless longing when I admire the large, playful mobile sculpture standing at the entrance, a complex, colorful structure with paddles seemingly moved by the wind, but in reality, ...

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8. Westward Ho with Kholiwood: The Transnational Turn in the Neoliberal Marketplace

Richard Ellis

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pp. 178-200

In 2005, Lonely Planet, the London-based travel guide publishers, published City Break Secrets, a section of which endeavored to convey the appeal of the Big Apple. What was slightly surprising was the terms in which it chose to do this: “New York[:] Exploration here can go as deep as you let it. Have a Mexican tamale breakfast, catch a Bollywood flick, or simply grab a pizza” (14). ...

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Second Look—Richard Ellis on Zsófia Bán

Richard Ellis

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pp. 201-204

On a tourist visit to Turkey, coming over from the Greek island of Lesbos on a day trip to Dikili, while stuck in the port immigration area waiting for the group’s visas to be cleared (this delay a product of an enduring antagonistic mistrust between Greece and Turkey that is just one fragment of Europe’s convoluted history), I looked through the iron fence of the port holding area onto one of Dikili’s main squares. ...

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Second Look—Zsófia Bán on Richard Ellis

Zsófia Bán

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pp. 205-207

As Richard Ellis aptly points out in the conclusion of his piece in this book: “a new kind of approach to USAmerican studies is indeed necessary—one fundamentally informed by processes of contact, hybridity, exchange, flow, and migration, and alert to issues of (dis)advantaged exchange and (dis)location.” Discussing the variants offered by “New American Studies” ...

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Third Look—Ana Mauad on Bán and Ellis—An Imagined Community for the Twenty-First Century?

Ana Mauad

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pp. 208-214

In 1991 English historian Benedict Anderson published a revised edition of the book Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. This book was first published in 1983, almost ten years before the revised one, and can be considered an important contribution to the historiography of nationalism and colonialism. In the preface to the new edition, ...

Part V. Disrupting Binaries: Whose “Country Music” and Whose “Hip-Hop”?

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9. Tales of the West: “Americanization” in an Era of “Europeanization”

Kristin Solli

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pp. 217-238

In the early 2000s, “the West” as a geopolitical unit was under intense pressure. In an article in the Atlantic Monthly from 2002 titled “The End of the West,” Charles A. Kupchan, an expert on European-U.S. relations, predicted that “the next clash of civilizations will not be between the West and the rest but between the United States and Europe.”1 ...

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10. Japanese Rappers, 9/11, and Soft Power: Anti-American Sentiments in “American” Popular Culture

Ian Condry

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pp. 239-250

What do the terms “pro-American” and “anti-American” mean in today’s globalizing world? Is it pro-American to argue that prisoners should not be held without a fair trial? Is it pro-American when we are talking about journalists held in Beijing prisons but anti-American if we are referring to “enemy combatants” held in Guantanamo Bay by the U.S. military? ...

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Second Look—Ian Condry on Kristin Solli

Ian Condry

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pp. 251-253

In the summer of 1993, I had the opportunity to attend a Lakota Sioux powwow on Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. As I read Kristin Solli’s fascinating essay, I was reminded of the multiple levels of “Americanization” that I witnessed at this summer festival for Native Americans. Solli shows us that the meanings of America at Norwegian country music festivals are shaped by the history of Norway, ...

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Second Look—Kristin Solli on Ian Condry

Kristin Solli

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pp. 254-257

Kristin SolliIan Condry’s analysis of hip-hop in Japan shows how the Japanese hip-hop scene infuses the genre with local concerns, politics, and histories. More specifically, Condry introduces us to the Japanese concept genba as an analytical tool that captures how music becomes meaningful at very specific moments, times, and places. “Genba,” Condry explains, ...

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Third Look—Michael Titlestad on Solli and Condry—“Dreaming America”

Michael Titlestad

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pp. 258-262

For all the efforts of (postmodern, poststructuralist, postcolonial, and postMarxist) theorists at describing transnational histories, epistemologies, and processes of identification, and their attempts to complicate hydraulic notions of resistance to hegemony, much analysis remains trapped in an anachronistic understanding of the dynamics of culture. ...

Part VI. Is It “Americanization” or “Pro-Americanism”? The Americas, Pan-Americanism, and Immigration

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11. “Making Pals in Panama”: U.S.–Latin American Relations and the Trope of the Good Neighbor in Coca-Cola Advertising during the 1940s

Amy Spellacy

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pp. 265-289

On the back cover of the April 1944 issue of National Geographic, an ad for Coca-Cola promoted inter-American friendship and cooperation with an image of U.S. servicemen sharing Coca-Cola with a Panamanian man and his son. Ships pass peacefully through the Panama Canal in the background while the servicemen and the Panamanians share a moment of camaraderie and enjoy Coca-Cola provided by the soldiers. ...

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12. Americanism and Anti-Americanism of Mexican Immigrants in Los Angeles

Guillermo Ibarra

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pp. 290-297

In the book Anti-Americanism in the Islamic World, Sigrid Faath points out that after 9/11 the term “anti-Americanism” has been used as a synonym for negative opinion or sentiment regarding the foreign policy of the United States in another country. Based on the definition of the term by Alvin Z. Rubinstein and Donald B. Smith, ...

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Second Look—Guillermo Ibarra on Amy Spellacy

Guillermo Ibarra

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pp. 298-303

In her essay on Coca-Cola and the creation of social and racial boundaries in U.S.–Latin America relations, Amy Spellacy connects the Good Neighbor policy in Panama to inequality in U.S. society during and after World War II. She considers neighborhood soda fountains, which were configured as sites of racial exclusion in the postwar period, ...

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Second Look—Amy Spellacy on Guillermo Ibarra

Amy Spellacy

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pp. 304-307

In his essay “Americanism and Anti-Americanism of Mexican Immigrants in Los Angeles,” Guillermo Ibarra examines the ways that Mexican immigrants in the United States enact a new form of citizenship and reshape the American cities in which they live. He is interested in tensions between Mexican immigrants and other Americans and in how these two populations view each other. ...

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Third Look—Virginia R. Domínguez on Spellacy and Ibarra—“Not Just for Latin Americanists”

Virginia R. Domínguez

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pp. 308-312

Clearly of interest to Latin Americanists, hemispheric studies scholars, Latina/o studies scholars, and U.S. American Studies scholars with a special interest in the U.S.–Latin America relationship, this section should intrigue all of us engaging with the United States, especially in its various twentieth- and twenty-first-century incarnations. ...

Contributors

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pp. 313-318

Index

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pp. 319-332

Series Titles

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