Cover

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p. i

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. ii-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

Many people helped us, both directly and indirectly, to assemble this volume. We are grateful to Marybeth Gasman, Andrés Samayoa, Alice Ginsberg, and the Center for Minority Serving Institution at the University of Pennsylvania for brainstorming with us in Philadelphia during the early stages of this project and for supporting us throughout its entirety. Funds from the Research Support Committee in the School of Education and Human Services at Oakland University allowed us time together to conceptualize this project. We appreciate Cheryl Crazy Bull and Tarajean Yazzie-Mintz at the American...

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Introduction. Teacher Education across Minority-Serving Institutions

Emery Petchauer and Lynnette Mawhinney

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pp. 1-12

Teacher education programs are as diverse as the students who attend them. Many programs are nested within large, flagship state institutions with long histories of educating teachers. For some institutions, even smaller ones, this history began as normal schools responsible for training teachers. In these programs, teacher candidates move through advisors, field instructors, adjunct instructors, full-time professors, cooperating teachers in the field, and other supports during their professional matriculation. The most effective of these programs exhibits certain qualities: they maintain a cohesive...

Part One. Community Connections and Justice-Oriented Teacher Education

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1. The Promise of Equity. Preparing Future Teachers to Be Socially Just Educators

Mae S. Chaplin and Annette M. Daoud

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pp. 15-34

Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) play an integral role in recruiting and preparing students from traditionally underserved populations for careers that require postbaccalaureate education. For K–12 teacher education programs at MSIs, justice-oriented pedagogies are essential components in developing and retaining transformative educators from various backgrounds (Gasman and Conrad 2013). Educators who enter the fi eld of public education must not only prepare to work with students from varied backgrounds but also possess the capacity to navigate a system that often dehumanizes its students...

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2. Learning from the Community. Innovative Partnerships That Inform Tribal College Teacher Education Programming

Danielle Lansing

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pp. 35-50

Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCU) play a fundamental role in developing future educational leaders for tribal nations across the United States. Teacher education programs at TCUs continue to be integral in developing Native teachers for early childhood centers and K–12 schools that serve tribal nations. These TCU teacher education programs are unique because the collaborative partnerships maintained within their local communities deeply inform the education programs. Notions of service and reciprocal capacity build the relationships between TCUs and their respective tribal nations. To exemplify...

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3. Teacher Preparation for Our Communities. Building Co-teaching Collaborative Schools from the Ground Up

Cheryl A. Franklin Torrez, Jonathan Brinkerhoff, and Irene Welch

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pp. 51-66

In this chapter we describe an innovative model of clinical preparation for teacher candidates. Our collaborative model, co-teaching collaborative schools (CTCS), has been successful for all participants. This equitable and organic university-school partnership model of clinical preparation may inform other teacher preparation programs as we all endeavor to better prepare future teachers and positively impact current and future elementary classrooms. We describe this innovative model by providing a background and framework for the CTCS, a description of what the schools look like in practice,...

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4. From Our Own Gardens. Growing Our Own Bilingual Teachers in the Southwest

Sandra Browning

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pp. 67-84

In the Southwest of the United States, the growth of the Hispanic population has established the need for universities and colleges to seek ways to best serve this population (Benítez 1998; Santiago 2006; De Los Santos and De Los Santos 2003). According to University of Houston’s Hobby Center for Public Policy (2012) and the United States Census Bureau (2014), the Hispanic population in Texas has grown 38.4 percent and will continue to grow at a faster rate than other ethnic groups. Many Hispanic immigrants coming to Texas have settled in major urban areas in search of jobs (Laden 2001). With the...

Part Two. Program Responses to Contemporary Demands

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5. Lifting Gates and Building Skills. Preparing Diverse Candidates to Pass New Certification Exams

Joni S. Kolman, Laura M. Gellert, and Denise L. Mclurkin

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pp. 87-108

Teacher effectiveness is a central concern of policy makers, educators, and the public at large. Within the national discourse on improving educational experiences for all children, debates endure on the appropriate gates for entry to the teaching profession and how to assess the readiness and fitness of teacher candidates (Cochran-Smith and Fries 2005; Goodwin and Oyler 2008; Zumwalt and Craig 2008). Often disputed is the value of teacher certification (certification exams in particular) in ensuring that quality teachers are in classrooms (Hess 2003; Wilson and Youngs 2005; Zumwalt and Craig 2008). Although...

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6. Special Education Teacher Preparation Reform in Context. Lessons from a Decade of Program Support

Mary Bay, Norma A. Lopez-Reyna, and Rosanne Ward

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pp. 109-127

Most would agree that the reform of teacher preparation programs is not done in a vacuum. It is done in a particular context, and factors in that context play a key role in the nature of the reform work (Cochran-Smith et al. 2008; Cochran-Smith and Villegas 2015; Delandshere and Petrosky 2004; Elmore 2004; Kennedy 2010; Wang et al. 2010). In our experience working with hundreds of teacher educators who were engaged in teacher preparation program reform, we often heard comments, stories, and descriptions of dilemmas that exemplified how an array of contextual factors surfaced that either...

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7. Becoming a Black Institution. Challenges and Changes for Teacher Education Programs at Emerging Minority-Serving Institutions

Byung-in Seo, Dewitt Scott, and Emery Petchauer

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pp. 128-142

Many colleges and universities now designated as Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) were formed specifically to educate certain segments of the population. For example, philanthropists, government agencies, and communities formed Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to educate African Americans because most higher education institutions would not accept students of color or other minority groups (Abelman and Dalessandro 2009; Brown and Davis 2001). Some institutions, however, began as predominately white institutions and through demographic and policy changes...

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8. The Future of Teacher Education at Tribal Colleges and Universities. A Talking Circle of Education Warriors

Carmelita Lamb

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pp. 143-160

The American Indian self-determination movement of the 1960s gave birth to the concept of Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). During this time, tribal leaders began considering alternative ways to provide opportunities in higher education for their people in a place-based reservation environment. Instead of Indian people leaving the reservation for an education, which had been the history of Indian education since the early nineteenth century (with very limited success), postsecondary opportunity needed to be part of the Native community in which Indian students lived. Thus, in 1968, the Navajo...

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9. Teacher Preparation at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Remaining Relevant in a Climate of Accountability

Brian Harper and Lynnette Mawhinney

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pp. 161-176

The specific contribution of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to the fi eld of higher education is undeniable (Harper 2007). Historically Black Colleges and Universities were founded on principles of service, activism, and identity tied to the larger movement of racial uplift in Black communities (Anderson 1988). These tenets continue to inform the ways they conceptualize, design, and implement teacher preparation. Beginning in 1837 with Cheyney University, which was closely followed by Lincoln University, the first degree-granting Black institution, the 105 HBCUs in this country...

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Conclusion. Teacher Education beyond Minority-Serving Institutions

Emery Petchauer and Lynnette Mawhinney

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pp. 177-182

This volume presents chapters that speak to and reveal the important and varied teacher education work happening at Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs). Some authors wrote of work happening at particular institutions. In doing so, they gave attention to the holistic perspective on preservice teacher development that MSIs often take. In some instances, this looks like anticipating the barriers—both professional and personal—their preservice teachers may experience so that the institutions may either establish supports before a crisis or develop them quickly when needs arise. Other authors attended...

Notes on Contributors

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pp. 183-188

Index

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pp. 189-196