Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xiv

BIOGRAPHERS RISK CHOOSING a subject whose life, although perhaps interesting, does not merit a full-length study. This is not the case with John Archibald Campbell, who served as an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1853 to 1861 and whose life and labors reflect nearly every major...

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1. Ancestry and Antecedents

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pp. 1-19

Campbell was descended from small farmers of the Scottish Highlands. Both the paternal and maternal sides of his family tree included individuals of marked achievement, and brief composites of these people reveal much about the character and background of John Archibald Campbell. In addition, a concise...

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2. Professional Career, 1830–1842

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pp. 20-38

Having been born into Georgia's elite, Campbell felt more than obligated to assume a leadership role. His genuine desire for a career in public service originated in his intense ambition and his drive to become politically prominent and did not necessarily reflect any profound sense of duty. As the law was the...

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3. Submerged Lands and States' Rights

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pp. 39-56

The 1830s and 1840s marked a period of genuine accomplishment in Campbell's career. His move to Mobile placed him amid a web of lucrative litigation, primarily concerning land disputes, that brought him recognition, wealth, and prestige. He was viewed as one of the most talented lawyers in the state...

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4. Campbell and the Peculiar Institution

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pp. 57-68

Campbell's four publications appearing in the Southern Quarterly Review between 1847 and 1851-"Slavery in the United States" (July 1847), "Slavery Among the Romans" (October 1848), "British West India Islands" (January 1850), and "Slavery Throughout the World" (April 1851)-reveal that he devoted...

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5. The Crisis at Midcentury

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pp. 69-83

Thus far in Campbell's public career, his political philosophy as revealed in personal letters and during court appearances was centered on a moderate version of states' rights. During his tenure as a state representative in 1836-1837, Campbell's letters to Henry Goldthwaite show that he despised the proponents...

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6. States' Rights Triumphant

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pp. 84-104

Campbell was pleased that Zachary Taylor won the 1848 presidential contest. He was evidently under the impression that the new president would protect southern interests during a time of increased hostility between the northern and the southern states and when, as Campbell viewed the situation...

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7. States' Rights Justice, Part 1: Commerce, Contracts, and Quitman

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pp. 105-123

Campbell's law practice in Mobile became increasingly active throughout the 1840s and early 1850s. He was admitted to the United States Supreme Court bar in 1849, and between 1850 and 1852 he argued twelve cases in Washington. Although he lost seven of these cases, his arguments so impressed the justices...

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8. States' Rights Justice, Part 2: Dred Scott and Sherman Booth

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pp. 124-135

It is unfortunate, but with hindsight clearly understandable, that the Taney Court has been most notably remembered for its fateful decision in the Dred Scott case. The Court's ruling in this 1857 litigation spawned the popularly held view that the southern members of the Court comprised a slave power...

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9. The War Years, Part 1: To Mitigate the Evils upon the Country

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pp. 136-160

As for literally millions of other Americans, the Civil War years were the most tragic in Campbell's life. Not only did he relinquish his coveted position on the Supreme Court, but his family suffered tremendously during the war. Campbell continued to serve on the Court throughout 1860 and into 1861...

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10. The War Years, Part 2: That We Should Not Be Utterly Destroyed

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pp. 161-185

On the morning of 3 February 1865, a small boat carrying three passengers was rowed across Hampton Roads, Virginia, toward the United States steamer River Queen. On board were three Confederate commissioners from Richmond: Vice-President Alexander Stephens, Senator R. M. T. Hunter, and Assistant...

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11. Reconstruction and Redemption

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pp. 186-209

Campbell spent the remaining twenty-four years of his life practicing law. In many respects, these years were his most productive. Although he had lost virtually all of his possessions during the war, and although he was unemployed after the Confederacy's defeat, Campbell worked diligently to rebuild his once...

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12. Postwar Palingenesis

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pp. 210-229

After the war, Campbell's most pressing concern was his family's financial security; all else was of secondary importance to him. In that regard, after his release from Fort Pulaski in October 1865, Campbell plunged himself into the legal profession that had once brought him and his family wealth, security, and...

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13. Conclusion

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pp. 230-236

On Saturday, 6 April 1889, two memorial meetings were held in honor of John Archibald Campbell. The first was conducted at Washington, D.C., in the United States Supreme Court, and the second was held in the Fifth Circuit Courthouse in New Orleans. The purpose of these meetings was to pay tribute...

Notes

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pp. 237-266

Bibliography

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pp. 267-278

Index

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pp. 279-285