Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Series Foreword

George Kalantzis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

In his book The Spirit of Early Christian Thought, Robert Louis Wilken reminds us that “Christianity is more than a set of devotional practices and a moral code: it is also a way of thinking about God, about human beings, about the world and history” (xiii). From its earliest times, ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xxx

The present volume offers English translations together with explanatory notes for fifteen important early Christian writings that deal with biblical interpretation. The purpose of this collection is to provide a useful survey of early Christian interpretation of Scripture through primary sources, ...

Part I: Texts and Translations

read more

1. Epistle of Barnabas

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-16

The Epistle of Barnabas was likely written in the first few decades of the second century CE. Its author is unknown. Many scholars have suggested Alexandria as its place of origin, but others have proposed Syria-Palestine or Asia Minor. Indeed, the Epistle of Barnabas reflects a variety of influences, ...

read more

2. Justin Martyr

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-26

Justin Martyr was born of non-Jewish parents ca. 100 CE in Flavia Neapolis in Palestine. He spent considerable time in Rome, where he wrote two Christian apologies (1–2 Apology) ca. 146–160 CE. Shortly afterward Justin wrote his Dialogue with Trypho, the earliest preserved Christian apologetic work addressing Judaism. ...

read more

3. Irenaeus

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-42

Irenaeus was born ca. 135 CE in Asia Minor, spent considerable time in Rome ca. 155–165, and eventually served as bishop of Lyon in Gaul from at least 177. He died some time after 198. As a young man Irenaeus met Polycarp, who related to him various personal reminiscences about the apostle John (Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History 5.20.4–8). ...

read more

4. Tertullian

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-52

Tertullian was born ca. 160 CE in the North African city of Carthage, and he lived until at least 220. He evidently received a solid education, especially in rhetoric and law; and although he was fully competent in Greek, Tertullian became the first Christian writer to compose his own theological works in Latin, ...

read more

5. Cyprian

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 53-64

Born ca. 200–210 CE to a wealthy family in North Africa, Cyprian obtained renown as an orator prior to his conversion to Christianity ca. 246. Shortly thereafter in 249 he was elected bishop of Carthage, having demonstrated his pastoral disposition by employing his wealth to give generously to the poor. During the Decian persecution of 250–251, ...

read more

6. Origen

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-90

Origen was born ca. 185 CE to Christian parents living in Alexandria, Egypt. He received a thorough education in classical literature and philosophy, and his writings also reflect his intimate familiarity with the Bible and with theological authors such as Philo and Clement of Alexandria. ...

read more

7. Eusebius of Caesarea

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-98

Eusebius was born in Palestine ca. 265 CE and was educated in Caesarea under the tutelage of the Presbyter Pamphilus, who was martyred in 310 during Diocletian’s persecution. Caesarea was the location of Origen’s library, and Pamphilus had been Origen’s student. Eusebius inherited from Pamphilus ...

read more

8. Ephrem the Syrian

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-128

Ephrem is the only figure included in this volume who did not write in Greek or Latin. Ephrem composed his works in Syriac, a dialect of Aramaic used by many Christians in the eastern parts of the Roman Empire and in regions under Persian rule. A comprehensive survey of biblical interpretation in the early church would include sources ...

read more

9. Diodore of Tarsus

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 129-142

Diodore was born in Antioch ca. 330 CE and received a first-rate classical education. In the church of Antioch Diodore was ordained a priest and became the teacher of a group of ascetically minded students, including Theodore of Mopsuestia and John Chrysostom. Diodore left Antioch ca. 378 to become bishop of Tarsus, ...

read more

10. Gregory of Nyssa

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 143-164

Born in Cappadocia (in modern Turkey) ca. 340 CE, Gregory of Nyssa is one of the three “Cappadocian Fathers,” alongside his brother Basil of Caesarea and their friend Gregory of Nazianzus, who together definitively shaped Trinitarian theology in the late fourth century. Gregory of Nyssa was the youngest of the group. ...

read more

11. Jerome

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-182

Jerome was born ca. 347 CE and spent his early life in Stridon, a small town in the Roman province of Dalmatia. He received his primary education in his hometown under the supervision of his Christian parents, who were wealthy enough to employ teachers for Jerome and his brother. ...

read more

12. Theodore of Mopsuestia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-196

Born ca. 350 CE, Theodore studied rhetoric together with John Chrysostom under the sophist Libanius, the most prominent teacher of rhetoric in Antioch. Later, John Chrysostom, Theodore, and a certain Maximus of Seleucia abandoned their secular careers and entered into a Christian ascetic community led by Diodore of Tarsus ...

read more

13. John Chrysostom

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 197-214

John “Chrysostom” of Antioch was the most renowned preacher of his era. Within a century after his death he came to be known by the epithet Chrysostomos, “golden-mouthed.” Chrysostom was born ca. 349 CE in or around Antioch. His father died when he was young, but his family had the resources to provide him with an excellent education. ...

read more

14. Augustine

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 215-242

Augustine was born in 354 CE in the city of Thagaste, located in the northeast corner of modern Algeria. In Augustine’s day, important cities in North Africa such as Thagaste were dominated by Roman culture and language. Augustine’s father Patricius was apparently of Roman background and possessed sufficient means to provide a solid Roman education for his son. ...

read more

15. John Cassian

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 243-252

John Cassian was born ca. 360 CE in Scythia, the region encompassed by the Danube River and the Black Sea. While still a young man perhaps in his early twenties (ca. 382), Cassian left behind his family’s estate and traveled east together with a friend named Germanus in order to stay at a monastery in Bethlehem. ...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 253-260

Name and Subject Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 261-268

Scripture Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 269-284

Ancient Authors and Works Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 285-299

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF