Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

I am profoundly grateful for and humbled by the support I have been given in the process of completing this project. My archival research and manuscript writing was supported by an American Association of University Women postdoctoral research fellowship (2014–2015) as well as by research grants from the Center for Latin American Studies, ...

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Introduction: Decolonial Spain

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pp. 1-22

Machado wrote as a member of the “generation of ’98,” a group of Spanish writers, artists, and intellectuals preoccupied with imagining and reimagining a Spain in crisis. Defeated by the United States in the 1898 Spanish-American War, Spain lost its last colonies of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines. ...

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1. Spectacles of Gender and Nation: Red Carmens within and without History

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pp. 23-53

When the Spanish army revolted in Morocco and mainland Spain on July 17, 1936, the Nationalist offensive easily won some cities in Spain. Despite resistance from police forces loyal to the Republican government, within hours the Nationalists took possession of Pamplona, Zaragoza, Oviedo, Salamanca, Ávila, Segovia, and Cádiz. ...

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2. The Making of a Transatlantic Sister Republic: Good Neighbors and Air Raids in Spain

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pp. 54-80

Nationalist forces targeted Guernica on Monday, April 26, 1937. The population of the town was usually about seven thousand people. Refugees from the surrounding areas had increased the population to around ten thousand in April, the tenth month of the Spanish Civil War. ...

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3. “Everyone Has His Lorca”: Andalusi Pasts and US and Caribbean Resistance

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pp. 81-118

Federico García Lorca was murdered in August 1936. He was arrested and taken from his family’s home in Granada, driven out of the city, and shot by a faction of Falangist sympathizers. His assailants dropped his body into an unmarked mass grave, among the first of many that would be created in the next three years. ...

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4. Moros a la costa: Blackness and the Spanish Civil War

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pp. 119-157

On January 17, 1937, the trees along Barcelona’s port scratched at a wintry sky. Catalan photographer Agustí Centelles waited at the port, about to photograph the arrival of the first ­US-based volunteers to Spain arriving from New York Harbor. At the dock, the new US volunteers melded with a welcoming contingent of Catalans and International Brigade soldiers, recruits, and officers. ...

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5. Dramaturgies of No-Where: Exile and Repression in Spain and the Americas

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pp. 158-184

In the fall of 1938, President Juan Negrín, hoping to persuade other countries to come to his aid, sent the International Brigade volunteers home from Spain. Their numbers had been decimated, and they had suffered brutal defeats. The Republic arranged a farewell celebration for the volunteers in Barcelona. Dolores Ibárruri (La Pasionara), ...

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Conclusion: Worlds Otherwise

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pp. 185-194

In 1975 General Francisco Franco was buried with his men at the Valley of the Fallen, and Spain began its transition to democracy through government by constitutional monarchy. The transition, though difficult, did not engender another civil war, despite years of repressive rule. The (largely) bloodless and (fairly) rapid transition out of nearly forty years of totalitarian rule has been credited in significant part to the Amnesty Law passed in 1977: ...

Notes

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pp. 195-234

Index

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pp. 235-246

Further Series Titles

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