Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Series Titles, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

The symposia at Dartmouth and Princeton would not have taken place without the creative efforts and organizational skills of two individuals: Timothy Rub, director of the Hood Museum of Art in Hanover, and J. Michael Padgett, associate curator of ancient art at the Art Museum in Princeton. Professors Jeremy Rutter of Dartmouth ...

Contributors

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pp. xi-xii

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Introduction

Jenifer Neils

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pp. 3-6

In the fall of 1992, the exhibition Goddess and Polis: The Panathenaic Festival in Ancient Athens opened at the Hood Museum of Dartmouth College. At that time an interdisciplinary symposium entitled "Athens and Beyond" was held with the purpose of exploring the role of this festival in Athenian life and considering it in comparison with similar festivals held throughout the ancient Greek world. ...

Part I. Myth and Cult

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1. Theseus and Athenian Festivals

Erika Simon

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pp. 9-26

In our mythical tradition the kings Kekrops and Erechtheus are put into the earliest dawn of Athenian civilization. Theseus belonged to a later phase of that sunrise; and he did not emerge from Attic soil like those first autochthonous kings, but came from abroad, the Peloponnese, the cradle of Mycenaean culture. ...

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2. Athena's Shrines and Festivals

Noel Robertson

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pp. 27-77

The temples and statues of the Acropolis are admired as monuments of the wealth and taste of fifth-century Athens, and were meant to be. They were also meant for use, or to enhance the occasions when other parts of the Acropolis were put to use. To explore this use is interesting in itself and indispensable to a full appreciation of the monuments. ...

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3. Women in the Panathenaic and Other Festivals

Mary R. Lefkowitz

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pp. 78-92

In recent literature about women in ancient Athens, it has become commonplace to emphasize the restrictions and limitations of their lives—their confinement within the sphere of the oikos, and their exclusion from political life—and to point out how these limitations were defined and even celebrated in Athenian myths.1 ...

Part II. Contests and Prizes

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4. Group and Single Competitions and the Panathenaia

Alan L. Boegehold

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pp. 95-105

For group and single competitions at the Panathenaia we have lists, officially inscribed in stone, that name competitions and stipulate prizes as well. We have pictures, poems, and prose, the poetry mainly praise, the prose including some blame. If obscurities or questions persist, that is to be expected in all of our inquiries into Hellenic antiquity. ...

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5. Gifts and Glory: Panathenaic and Other Greek Athletic Prizes

Donald G. Kyle

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pp. 106-136

One of the most distinctive features of Greek athletics, in addition to nudity, was prize giving. From at least Homer's Achaeans to the late Roman empire, Greeks gave an astounding variety of prizes, from wreaths to money, from women to oil.1 Almost any Greek community or group, from city-states at home to mercenaries abroad, ...

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6. Panathenaic Amphoras: The Other Side

Richard Hamilton

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pp. 137-162

There are three classes of information for the prizes given at the Panathenaic games: inscriptions, testimonia, and vases. Since the inscriptions are late and the testimonia are meager in the extreme, it is not surprising that scholars studying the games have turned to the Panathenaic amphoras, which exist in large numbers and extend for more than two hundred years, ...

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7. Shield Devices and Column-Mounted Statues on Panathenaic Amphoras: Some Remarks on Iconography

Michalis Tiverios

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pp. 163-174

As is widely known, Panathenaic amphoras of the fourth century are distinguished by the fact that the prize vases made in anyone year-that is, during the tenure of a particular eponymous archon-all display on their main face the same type of statue, mounted on columns flanking the goddess Athena. ...

Part III. Art and Politics

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8. Pride, Pomp, and Circumstance: The Iconography of Procession

Jenifer Neils

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pp. 177-197

The Parthenon frieze, a 524-foot-Iong by just over 3-foot-high band of relief sculpture, has been called the best-known but least well understood work of Greek art. However, unlike much of Greek art, we do know a fair amount about the frieze's context-that is, its location, its approximate date, and its designer. ...

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9. The Web of History: A Conservative Reading of the Parthenon Frieze

Evelyn B. Harrison

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pp. 198-214

A conservative reading naturally goes together with a conservative attitude toward the text that is being read.1 In the case of the Parthenon frieze, we must try to keep all of it in view, and that is not always easy. In antiquity, the west frieze (Fig. 9.1) was the first to confront the visitor to the Acropolis of Athens, ...

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10. Democracy and Imperialism: The Panathenaia in the Age of Perikles

H. A. Shapiro

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pp. 215-228

In the more than one-thousand-year history of the Panathenaia, we usually recognize only one fixed point: 566, the year the festival was reorganized and the distinction between the yearly celebration and the four-yearly Greater Panathenaia first established. From this point on, apart from certain modifications, additions, and adjustments, ...

Abbreviations

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p. 229

Bibliography

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pp. 230-240

Index of Ancient Authors

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pp. 241-244

Index

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pp. 245-249