Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgements

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pp. ix-x

List of Illustrations

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pp. xi-xii

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Introduction. Wars and Their Omnipresence

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pp. 3-18

It had nothing to do with Ernest Miller Hemingway, the pervasive presence of cataclysmic wars during his comparatively short life. Born July 21, 1899, Hemingway was a boy fascinated with the tragedies that accompanied all wars, and from the start of World War I in the spring of 1914, he was a conscientiously thorough student of the science of war. ...

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Chapter One. The Writer Writes

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pp. 19-36

Wounded by a trench mortar shell on July 8, 1918, Hemingway did not write about his out-of-body experience for nearly ten years. Rather than being obsessed with his writerly aim of describing such wounding, he buried the experience in his subconscious and instead practiced, rigorously, the craft of writing. ...

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Chapter Two. in our time, In Our Time and Dimensionality

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pp. 37-54

The progression of Hemingway’s fiction-writing skills between Robert McAlmon’s Contact edition of Three Stories and Ten Poems in 1923 and the Boni & Liveright publication two years later of In Our Time was incredibly slow. The 1925 In Our Time includes two of the three stories from Three Stories and Ten Poems, but in place of the poems, ...

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Chapter Three. When the Sun Rose

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pp. 55-70

It was often considered a roman à clef. Hemingway’s first real novel, The Sun Also Rises, appeared from Scribner’s in 1926 and immediately propelled Hemingway into an elite kind of literary fame. Hadley said years later, with her usual candor, that she remembered every event in the book: ...

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Chapter Four. To the War

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pp. 71-92

Hemingway reflected that he had written only three stories about World War I before he attempted his novel A Farewell to Arms. He listed “In Another Country,” “Now I Lay Me,” and “A Way You’ll Never Be,” clearly thinking of the other apparent stories of the war—“Soldier’s Home” and “Big Two-Hearted River”—as somehow integral to In Our Time ...

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Chapter Five. Politics and Celebrity

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pp. 93-112

An evaluation of Hemingway by one who knew him well is that of Charles Scribner Jr., his publisher, who marveled at the ways in which Hemingway used everything he experienced. In his publisher’s preface to The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway, Scribner remarked, “Hemingway must have been one of the most perceptive travelers in the history of literature, and his stories taken as a whole present a world of experience.” ...

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Chapter Six. Hemingway’s Epics: “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” and For Whom the Bell Tolls

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pp. 113-134

Michael Reynolds is the most persuasive biographer to link Hemingway’s 1936 masterpiece of a story, “The Snows of Kilimanjaro,” with his 1940 novel about the Spanish Civil War, For Whom the Bell Tolls. He sees that each of these works used up enough material—characters, events, plots and subplots, language experiments, structural innovations, and wide-ranging metaphor that circumscribed the world of literature ...

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Chapter Seven. To the War Once Again

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pp. 135-152

Despite Hemingway’s disappointment over the Pulitzer judges’ denying For Whom the Bell Tolls the 1940 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction,1 he continued on with his personal plans: Martha Gellhorn and he were married November 21, 1940, in Cheyenne, Wyoming, by a justice of the peace, and friends then gave the couple a celebratory dinner of roast moose.2 ...

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Chapter Eight. After the War: Across the River and into the Trees

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pp. 153-170

Writing about war was still Ernest Hemingway’s métier, no matter how frightening or disillusioning he found his attempts at fighting in such conflicts. As his later fulsome letters to Buck Lanham show1—particularly those written after he had returned to Cuba to get the Finca Vigia ready for Mary’s first visit—he used the written word to erase some of his worst, ...

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Chapter Nine. The Old Man and the Sea

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pp. 171-186

When in a 1950 Harvey Breit interview Hemingway compared his 1940 book For Whom the Bell Tolls to his just-published novel Across the River and into the Trees, he collapsed the ten years that separated the two “war novels” into a moment of time. Admitting that For Whom the Bell Tolls was a much more specific account of a wartime battle, ...

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Chapter Ten. The Late Years

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pp. 187-202

Hemingway consistently defined power as his ability as a person to make unique choices. He loved the Pilar for the freedom it gave him to escape both domestic and professional life in order to live on the Gulf waters. He loved his income as a writer for providing his ability to make sometimes idiosyncratic choices about what he considered his responsibilities toward the people important to his life. ...

Notes

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pp. 203-224

Bibliography

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pp. 225-242

Index

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pp. 243-250