Cover

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Half Title, Series Titles, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Series Editors’ Preface

Jennifer Jensen Wallach, Michael Wise

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pp. ix-x

The University of Arkansas Press Series on Food and Foodways explores historical and contemporary issues in global food studies. We are committed to representing a diverse set of voices that tell lesser known food stories and to provoking new avenues of interdisciplinary research. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

First of all, we are grateful to Jennifer Jensen Wallach and Michael Wise for believing in our project. We also thank all the University of Arkansas Press staff that we had the pleasure to collaborate with. This book would have not been possible without the impressive work of all its contributors. We would like to thank each of them for their competence and punctuality. ...

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Introduction

Silvia Bottinelli, Margherita d’Ayala Valva

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pp. 3-20

Whether bathing in soup or leaving rotten leftovers in museum corners, cooking on oversized stoves in front of gallery visitors, or inviting unfamiliar guests to share homemade meals, these apparently unrelated actions have at least two elements in common: food and art. In fact, they are fundamental components of performative pieces by Janine Antoni, ...

Part I: Taste of Art: Methodologies and Critical Approaches

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Chapter 1. Can Cuisine Be Art?: A Philosophical (and Heterodox) Proposal

Nicola Perullo

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pp. 23-44

Whether cuisine can be considered art is a very old question that philosophy has posited frequently since Plato’s time. In the history of Western thought, many of the answers, primarily negative ones, began with a hypothesis to be verified as to whether cuisine had such characteristics that would allow it to be assimilated or included in the domain of the arts and in particular those which, ...

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Chapter 2. Time Changes Everything: Futurist/Modernist Cooking

Carol Helstosky

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pp. 45-60

Cooking, like art, is a transformative and dynamic process, intended to surprise, delight, or sometimes provoke the consumer. And, like art, cooking has deployed and directed our creative energy; gastronomy was, and remains, both an art and a science. For much of its history, gastronomy negotiates between innovation and surprise on the one hand, and familiarity and tradition on the other. ...

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Chapter 3. From Stove to Screen: Food Porn, Professional Chefs, and the Construction of Masculinity in Films

Fabio Parasecoli

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pp. 61-76

“Jennifer Freely is upstairs.” These words, delivered by a female maître’d to Udo Croppa, an up-and-coming chef in an Italian restaurant in downtown Manhattan, accelerate the pace of Dinner Rush, a film on the vagaries of the restaurant business.1 Its plot highlights the wrought relationship between an old-school restaurateur and his son, chef Udo, ...

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Chapter 4. Spoerri Reads Rumohr: The Spirit of Culinary Art Revisited

Margherita d’Ayala Valva

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pp. 77-90

In this essay, I argue that Daniel Spoerri’s writing on food is a form of palindromic reading. Conducting himself as an all-around amateur (Universaldilettant), Spoerri often chose sources that the scholarly world regarded as heterodox, including cookbooks that bore no temporal distance and that lacked traditional authority. ...

Part II: Food Art: Multisensoriality and Experience

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Chapter 5. Food, Decay, and Disgust: Paul McCarthy’s Bossy Burger as Contemporary Still Life

Anja Foerschner

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pp. 93-106

In the wake of the reformation, which transformed Dutch society in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, art was no longer reserved for churches and religious purposes, but rather found its way into the private realm.1 Food still lifes were among the genres that quickly gained popularity. Tables richly decorated with meats and exotic fruit, ...

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Chapter 6. In & On: Herbs, Fish, and Janine Antoni’s Touch

Silvia Bottinelli

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pp. 107-120

Dinner came with a holistic experience at the New York restaurant Park Avenue Summer, between June 11 and September 4, 2011.1 Diners were invited to try out body care products made from the same ingredients used for the dishes in the menu. Coffee grounds, lemon balm, lavender, peach, among many others, were to be found in the food and the soaks, mists, and scrubs offered to the costumers. ...

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Chapter 7. Luciano Fabro: Bitter Sweets for Nadezhda Mandelstam

Sharon Hecker

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pp. 121-140

At the inauguration of the 1990 exhibition Computers di Luciano Fabro, caramelle di Nadezda Mandel’stam (Luciano Fabro’s Computers, Nadezhda Mandelstam’s Candies) in Milan, students handed out sweets wrapped in photocopy paper (Plate 7.1 and Plate 7.2).1
Without much apparent consideration, the visitors unwrapped the treats and popped them into their mouths, ...

Part III: The Kitchen: Intersections between the Private and Public Spheres

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Chapter 8. Feminist Art: Kitchen Testimony

Jody B. Cutler

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pp. 143-158

In the United States, “first-generation feminist art,” recognized initially in the context of white, middle-class women, coalesced in the early 1970s largely through themes and images of the home and the female body, often merging the two.1 Feeding and eating, not surprisingly, were prevalent subjects that intersect in the kitchen with myriad notions of domesticity ...

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Chapter 9. Es Geht Um Die Wurst: On Peter Fischli and David Weiss’s Sausage Photographs

Edward A. Vazquez

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pp. 159-172

In Peter Fischli and David Weiss’s Fashion Show, one of ten photographs made in 1979 as part of the Swiss artists’ first collaborative project, Wurstserie, known in English as the Sausage Photographs, five models confidently saunter across a catwalk, their fashions as coordinated as their nonchalant, sideways glances (Plate 9.1). ...

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Chapter 10. Elżbieta Jabłońska’s Kitchen Interventions: Food, Art, and the Maternal Identity

Barbara Kutis

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pp. 173-188

Elżbieta Jabłońska gained critical acclaim for her work highlighting the experience of being a mother; she not only physically represented the mother in her art, but also deployed motherhood with a critical subjectivity that molded and defined her artistic actions. The artist’s strong emphasis on the maternal has caused Magdalena Ujma to proclaim, ...

Part IV: Eating Out: Food Art in the Public Sphere

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Chapter 11. Artists and Friends: Daniel Spoerri’s Eat Art Gallery

Cecilia Novero

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pp. 191-210

Eat Art came officially into being when Daniel Spoerri opened his gallery in Düsseldorf in 1970. The gallery was to accompany the Spoerri Restaurant, an enterprise he had begun earlier, in 1968, and the idea of which Spoerri had had while abroad, during his stay on the Greek island of Symi (1966–1967). ...

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Chapter 12. Express Yourself: Al’s Café in Context

Rachel Federman

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pp. 211-224

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, artists across the country raised their voices against the Vietnam War, as well as the art world’s entanglements with it. In New York, the Art Workers’ Coalition and its offshoots challenged museums on several fronts. Organizations such as the Black Emergency Cultural Coalition and Women Artists in Revolution ...

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Chapter 13. Ways of Eating: Tradition, Innovation, and the Production of Community in Food-Based Art

Laurie Beth Clark, Michael Peterson

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pp. 225-244

On November 8, 2006, the New York Times published a “revolutionary” new technique for baking bread, developed by Jim Lahey at the Sullivan Street Bakery.1 The “no-knead” technique involves quickly mixing a very moist dough with a small amount of yeast, and letting yeast and time do the work of developing the bread’s gluten. ...

Part V: Not for Art’s Sake: Ethics, Ecology, and Sustainability

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Chapter 14. Joseph Beuys: Gastrosophical Aesthetics

Harald Lemke

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pp. 247-262

Food has long been ignored in Western philosophy. This is quite a strange fact. Should food be something that is of no interest for human life and moral reason? To be sure, one of the central themes of philosophical ethics deals with the “Socratic” question of “how we should live.”1 ...

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Chapter 15. Provisional Objects: Alison Knowles’s Bean Rolls

Nicole L. Woods

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pp. 263-278

Addressing the “event” of Fluxus retrospectively, George Brecht, artist, collaborator, and close interlocutor of fellow Fluxus artist Alison Knowles, argued that it was small multiple works such as her Bean Rolls (1963–1964) that signaled the subversive potential of the entire Fluxus paradigm. ...

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Chapter 16. Cooking and Eating across Species: Natalie Jeremijenko’s Cross(x)Species Adventure Club

Lindsay Kelley

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pp. 279-292

Natalie Jeremijenko asks, “Can we rescript our interactions with nature?”2 Her answer focuses in part on the food we share with animals. Jeremijenko’s Cross(x)Species Adventure Club hosts supper clubs that feature menus designed to promote interaction between animals, plants, and humans. ...

Contributors

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pp. 293-300

Notes

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pp. 301-350

Index

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pp. 351-366

Image Plates

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