Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

“I realized that something was wrong,” Bogataj would recall years later to Philadelphia Daily News columnist Rich Hoffman. “I tried not to go, tried to stop myself. But the speed was too big, about 105 kilometers an hour [roughly 65 miles per hour]. So I did everything I was able to do.”1

You might not know the name Vinko Bogataj, but you know who he is—or at least you know his crash.

Earlier that day, Bogataj had left the chain factory in Yugoslavia where he worked, along with his three friends, to drive to Oberstdorf, West...

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1 | Joan Benoit: The Advent of Arthroscopic Surgery

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pp. 9-24

Olympia, Washington, was the site of what would be a historic race. In all, 238 runners left the starting line in the US qualifier for the 1984 Olympic marathon. That marathon would soon become a milestone as well, marking the first ever women’s marathon in the Olympics.1

One of those 238 competitors made the race historic for an entirely different reason. Joan Benoit left the starting line only 17 days after undergoing knee surgery.

Benoit started the race quickly, staying in the front of the pack. Due to her recent injuries, she ran cautiously for the first 12...

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2 | Bernard King: Return to Elite Sports after ACL Injury

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pp. 25-40

One minute and twenty-four seconds remained in a late season game between the New York Knicks and the Kansas City Kings.

Bernard King was by far the best player on the floor. He was leading the NBA in scoring that season, averaging 32.9 points per game so far. He had set a record for his hometown Knicks on Christmas Day, scoring 60 points.

Boston Celtics legend Larry Bird called King “the best scorer I’ve ever seen or played against,” that season.1

“He was so far above everyone else that it looked like he was playing on an...

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3 | Hines Ward: Use of Platelet-Rich Plasma and Stem Cells for Active People

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pp. 41-62

Normally finishing a game with only three catches for 55 yards would be a disappointment for a top player like Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward. Ward’s first catch in that playoff win against rival Baltimore gained the Steelers 45 yards and set up a field goal. With that catch, Ward had caught at least one pass in 13 straight postseason games.

It would be his second reception that had a lasting impact on sports medicine, although no one could have known that at the time.

With 6 minutes, 54 seconds left in the first quarter, Ward caught an 11-yard pass on third down...

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4 | Phillip Hughes: Use of Protective Equipment in Sports

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pp. 63-77

Professional cricketer Phillip Hughes was batting for South Australia in the Sheffield Shield match against New South Wales in Sydney. He was 63 not out when bowler Sean Abbott delivered a bouncer. Hughes swiveled his body to try to hook the ball but missed it. The ball slammed into the back of his head.

Hughes, wearing a helmet, collapsed on the field.

Hughes was resuscitated on the field, taken to St. Vincent’s Hospital, and placed in a medically induced coma. Despite two operations in which surgeons removed parts of his skull to relieve pressure on his brain, Hughes never regained...

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5 | Marc Buoniconti: Catastrophic Injuries in Football

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pp. 78-87

“Marc has a great instinct going for the ball, and it’s natural. He gets to the hole in a hurry. I think sometimes he gets to the hole so quick that he can’t set up for the tackle.”1 Former All-Pro and Hall of Fame linebacker Nick Buoniconti spoke those words about his son Marc, an inside linebacker at The Citadel, in 1983. Those seemingly innocuous words foreshadowed a tragic event that would befall his son about two years later.

October 26, 1985

The Citadel had traveled to Johnson City, Tennessee, to take on East Tennessee State. In the second quarter, with the Citadel leading 7-0, East Tennessee...

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6 | Sarah Burke: The Dangers of Extreme Sports

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pp. 88-102

Sarah Burke, a six-time medalist at the Winter X Games, attempted a routine flat spin 540 at the bottom of the 22-foot Eagle Superpipe at Park City Mountain Resort in Park City, Utah. The energy drink company Monster, which sponsored Burke, had rented out the halfpipe so that Burke could train for the Winter X Games, set to take place in Aspen later that month.

The 540 was a move the champion freestyle skier had landed thousands of times. Burke, after all, was the first female to ever successfully land a 720, 900, and 1080 in a competition....

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7 | Dave Duerson: Long-Term Brain Damage in Football

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pp. 103-130

Sunny Isles Beach was about as far from Soldier Field—both geographically and figuratively—as a football fan could imagine. Yet that warm, relaxed Florida locale—not the stadium where Dave Duerson was feared by offenses as a famed defensive back for the Chicago Bears—is where the injury that could change the sport forever occurred.

His condo in Sunny Isles Beach is where Duerson chose to commit suicide.

According to Dan Pompei of the Chicago Tribune, Duerson’s ex-wife Alicia received a text message at 3:00 that morning. “I love you. I always loved...

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8 | Sam Bowie: Medical Evaluation and Clearance of Athletes to Play

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pp. 131-150

“Portland selects Sam Bowie. University of Kentucky.”

Commissioner David Stern’s announcement of the second pick in the 1984 NBA draft surprised few people. After all, Bowie had arrived at Madison Square Garden carrying a Portland Trail Blazers jacket.

“Sam Bowie, the young man who came back from a stress fracture injury of the left shin bone. He was out for two seasons, redshirted, and he has come back. He has returned strong with Kentucky. And he’s now the second pick in...

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9 | Michael Jordan: Return-to-Play Decisions in Sports

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pp. 151-165

In only his second year in the league, Michael Jordan was already earning praise. Bob Sakamoto of the Chicago Tribune called the former University of North Carolina star “the heart and soul of this up-and-coming franchise.”1 Tribune columnist Bernie Lincicome argued that Jordan was “maybe the greatest natural basketball talent, inch for inch, in this young decade.”2

The Chicago Bulls star’s success derived not only from freakish physical ability but also arguably the best work ethic ever seen in sports. Described by Pulitzer Prize–winning author David Halberstam as “the hardest working NBA...

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10 | Hank Gathers: Sudden Cardiac Deaths and Universal Screening

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pp. 166-180

It was a dunk that college basketball fans had seen so many times before. Hank Gathers received the alley-oop pass from teammate Terrell Lowery and delivered his signature tomahawk dunk.

The best player on the nation’s highest scoring team then did exactly what he always did. He gave a high five to a teammate and then started playing defense.

There was 13:34 left in the first half when Gathers fell to the court. Moments later, officials canceled the game. Hours later, Hank Gathers passed...

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11 | Korey Stringer: Exertional Heat Stroke

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pp. 181-194

The northern latitude of Mankato, Minnesota, offered little relief from the brutal summer heat as the Minnesota Vikings began the second day of training camp.

With temperatures in the 90s and the heat index hitting 110, the Vikings practiced for two and one-half hours. The players wore full pads as they engaged in one-on-one drills with intense hitting.

The team’s medical staff, including head athletic trainer Chuck Barta, treated several Vikings players for heat-related problems that day. “You recognize you have the heat, you recognize you have to force fluids down them and you also...

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12 | Brandi Chastain: Prevention of ACL Injuries

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pp. 195-215

A 30-year-old native of San Jose, California, stood outside the penalty box in the Rose Bowl. A record crowd of 90,185 and an estimated 40 million American fans watching on TV held their breath.

After 90 minutes in the 1999 Women’s World Cup final, the United States and China were scoreless. Two 15-minute sessions in extra time did not produce a victory. After four out of five successful penalty kicks by the Chinese and four kicks netted by the Americans, Brandi Chastain stepped up to take the final penalty kick. A ball past China’s Gao Hong meant victory—and the Women’s...

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13 | Tommy John: Tommy John Surgery and Youth Baseball Injuries

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pp. 216-232

Chavez Ravine has been the site of many legendary baseball moments. Sandy Koufax pitched a complete game in game 4 of the 1963 World Series to clinch a championship for the team in only its second season playing in Dodger Stadium. Koufax threw a perfect game in 1965. Kirk Gibson hit a walk-off home run in the 1988 World Series. But it was a single pitch in a regular-season game against the Montréal Expos that ultimately would affect the careers of baseball pitchers for decades to come.

Thirty-one-year-old Tommy John entered the game against the Expos with a 13–3 record and 2.59 ERA. With a 4–0 lead entering the fourth inning...

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Conclusion

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pp. 233-246

I met Bill Walton in the late spring of 2015 during a meet-and-greet session for a conference in Chicago. He told me about his 37 orthopaedic surgeries, so naturally I asked to interview him for this book. I didn’t even have to explain its premise to him.

“Hopefully this book is about, ‘This is the way it used to be. This is the way it is now. How can we be better for the future so that our athletes, our young people, our guys who want to test themselves and are willing to go for everything out there, that they have the best chance of success, but they also have...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 247-250

My father actually came up with the idea for this book. He sent me a text message one night saying that I should write a book and call it That’s Gotta Hurt: The Injuries That Changed Sports Forever. He offered Joan Benoit, Bernard King, and Dave Duerson as examples of athletes whose injuries and injury treatments have changed their sports and the treatment of athletes of all ages. After a few more hours of texting, we had almost the entire list of athletes I discuss in this book.

In fact, he insisted I use the Wide World of Sports opening montage, with Vinko Bogataj crashing at the base of a ski jump, as my introduction. While...

Notes

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pp. 251-290

Index

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pp. 291-302

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About the Author

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pp. 303-304

Dr. David Geier is an orthopaedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist who provides education and commentary on sports and exercise injuries to athletes and active people to help them stay healthy and perform their best.

After spending eight years serving as director of sports medicine at an academic medical center, he left to start his own practice. He currently serves as medical director of sports medicine at a private hospital outside of Charleston, South Carolina. He holds a board certification from the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery in orthopaedic surgery as well as a subspecialty certification...