Accolades, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

A special group of women around me grew to love the women of this book and helped me hold on to their stories. Sally K. Lindsey assisted me with research and graphics. Joan Denniston, Bernadette Gallegos, Elizabeth Perrachione, and Rachel Meltzer each helped in special ways to bring these stories into the light. ...

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Foreward: Holy Indignation

Cornel West

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pp. xiii-xvi

This powerful and poignant book narrates the unique intersection of the two greatest social movements in nineteenth-century America: abolitionism and feminism. Author Helen LaKelly Hunt is uniquely attuned to these women—many lost to history—whose courage provided a “sacred blueprint” ...

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Introduction: Her Voice, Her Pen, Her Purse

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pp. 1-26

Some years ago, as I was doing research for my PhD, I found myself crouched on the basement floor of the Barnard Library in New York City. And as I was crawling along the lowest shelves of old history books, my hand found a small booklet. Pages that had once been white were now yellowed with age. ...

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1. Band of Sisters

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pp. 27-51

It was October 21, 1835. Maria Weston Chapman felt the meeting hall tremble around her, rocked by the force of five thousand pairs of stomping feet on the cobblestone streets outside. Her face and voice betrayed no alarm as she surveyed the group of forty-five women who had come together for a meeting of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society. ...

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2. A Convention Like No Other

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pp. 52-83

May 1837. The women came. Defying a myriad of social constraints and against all odds they came. Traveling by stagecoach and steamboat, they arrived in New York City, breathless and expectant, to convene the first Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women. They left their sanctioned roles to step out into the world. ...

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3. A Public Voice

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pp. 84-112

The hearts and minds of the attendees of the 1837 convention were never far from their British sisters who, in pioneering the idea of antislavery petitions, had literally brought their nation to heel. They were bold and made their presence known, adopting an original Wedgwood cameo image featuring a kneeling female slave as their logo. ...

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4. Fiery Backlash

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pp. 113-134

The day after Angelina’s wedding, at ten in the morning, the abolitionist women gathered for their second annual convention at the newly erected Pennsylvania Hall. There they joyfully embraced each other, having bonded across the miles in common effort. Two hundred and three women were named on the rolls, ...

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5. Walking with God

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pp. 135-154

What pushes a silent, personal quest to grow into a movement? It is fitting that we step back for a moment to reflect on the message of faith that pervaded everything the abolitionist women sought to do. These early feminists were empowered by faith and a conviction that they were acting in the name of God. ...

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6. Sympathy for the Woman

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pp. 155-175

Returning to Lynn, Massachusetts, after the 1838 convention, where she had dared to create public declarations as a mob raged outside, Abby Kelley was determined to renew her commitment to the abolitionist cause. But now the cause had expanded beyond the emancipation of the slaves to embrace her own and other women’s emancipation. ...

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7. The Bodyguard of Hearts

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pp. 176-197

A special solidarity followed the abolitionist feminists throughout their lives. The successes they achieved were made possible by the strength of their relationships. These women loved each other deeply, and the richness of their friendships gave them an elevated level of support. As Angelina once put it, “I feel that when I am speaking, ...

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Conclusion: “Thine in the Bonds of Womanhood”

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pp. 198-220

In 1978, I earned my masters in counseling at Southern Methodist University. Looking back, it seemed as if most of my life prepared me to heal fractures and restore connections—beginning with my own recovery of self. I met Harville Hendrix, a psychologist and professor of religion, a year after my divorce, and we began dating. ...

Notes

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pp. 221-232

Appendix A: Timeline of the Abolitionist Women’s Movement

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pp. 233-241

Images

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About the Authors

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Back Cover

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