Cover

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Dedication, Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Editor’s Note

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction The Cocktail Shift: Aligning Musical Exotica

Philip Hayward

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pp. 1-18

For anyone interested in exploring beyond the boundaries of the contemporary popular music scene, the past is a strange and wonderful place. Much of it is also a realm of amnesia. While the histories of forms such as the blues and jazz have been studiously recovered, recorded and analysed, other styles and genres remain obscure. Taste (and its politics) are the key factors here. The histories of blues and jazz have been explored by a loose association of enthusiasts, collectors and scholars. The motivation for such initiatives has been a curiosity which derives from particular combinations of personal, class...

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Chapter 1 Korla Pandit and Musical Indianism

Timothy D. Taylor

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pp. 19-44

In 1947, Klaus Landsberg, a German emigré, begin a stint as the head of station KTLA in Los Angeles. In this period there was no network support that far west, so Landsberg had to rely on his own ingenuity in devising programming for this new station. His partiality for “bright, ethnic music” (quoted by Stan Chambers, one-time KTLA employee, in Kisseloff, 1995: 174) resulted in, amongst other things, an off-beat program called Musical Adventure with Korla Pandit, which was broadcast three times per week from 1949 to 1951. Pandit was the son of an Indian Brahman, “a member of one of India’s first families”,...

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Chapter 2 Utopias of the Tropics – The Exotic Music of Les Baxter and Yma Sumac

Rebecca Leydon

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pp. 45-71

A defining feature of American instrumental pop music of the 1950s and early 1960s is its reliance on exotic references. The extraordinary recordings of Les Baxter and Yma Sumac are among the earliest and most successful examples of the genre. These albums were crucial for establishing the essential characteristics of the widely-imitated exotica style. Sumac’s The Voice of the Xtabay (1950) and Baxter’s Ritual of the Savage (Le Sacre du Sauvage)1 (1951) inaugurated a nation-wide exotica craze, subsequently propagated by lounge acts like Martin Denny and Arthur Lyman. Some of the signature...

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Chapter 3 Martin Denny and the Development of Musical Exotica

Shuhei Hosokawa

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pp. 72-93

In this chapter I raise questions about aesthetic and symbolic aspects of the production and consumption of musical exotica during the 1950s-early 1960s. Focusing on Martin Denny, a musician renowned for his lifelong commitment to the form, and the style of musical exotica his work pioneered and exemplified, I analyse the manner in which exotica and the exotic relate to tourism; the asymmetric power relations between the West and the rest of the world; and developments in sound technology during the period in question. This leads me to refute the contention that exotica is simply a naive and superficial...

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Chapter 4 Tropical Cool: The Arthur Lyman Sound

Jon Fitzgerald and Philip Hayward

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pp. 94-113

This chapter analyses the musical and cultural significance of the work of Hawaiian recording artist Arthur Lyman in the 1950s–1960s. Our discussion of Lyman’s oeuvre complements Shuhei Hosokawa’s exposition of key aspects of musical exotica, with particular regard to the work of Martin Denny, in the previous chapter. Given the broad similarity of Lyman’s musical approach to Denny’s, we do not attempt to duplicate such general analyses here. Rather, we locate Lyman’s career and musical style(s) within the context of post-War Hawai’i and the Hawaiian cultural ‘Renaissance’; offer a set of musicological...

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Chapter 5 Soy Sauce Music: Haruomi Hosono and Japanese Self-Orientalism

Shuhei Hosokawa

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pp. 114-144

In Chapter Three I discussed how Martin Denny popularised a form of exotica in the period between the Korean and Vietnam wars. The rising popularity of electric and Afro-American-influenced music, along with changes in the exotic imagination of white Americans (who constituted the majority of Denny’s audience) brought about the decline of the form. In the late 1960s the fantastic Orient and notions of the ‘tropical’ were gradually replaced by more geo-politically charged perceptions of ‘Asia’, ‘Africa’ and ‘The Pacific Rim’. Only tourists...

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Chapter 6 Musical Transport: Van Dyke Parks, Americana and the applied Orientalism of Tokyo Rose

Jon Fitzgerald and Philip Hayward

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pp. 145-167

Since the late 1960s, Van Dyke Parks (VDP) has explored various facets of Americana (understood as the elaborated cultural expression of aspects of the socio-cultural history of the U.S.A.) in a range of solo and collaborative projects. In the early-mid 1970s he complemented and inter-related this with a series of engagements with the music of the Southern Caribbean. In 1989 his work took a further turn with the release of an album entitled Tokyo Rose. This project deployed a range of musical orientalisms to produce a complex...

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Chapter 7 The Yanni Phenomenon

Karl Neuenfeldt

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pp. 168-189

“Wondrous”, “romantic”, “foreign”, “fascinating”. These synonyms appear when I check the word “exotic” in the thesaurus of my word processing program; an antonym is “ordinary”. The musician-composer Yanni – and the phenomenon of his fame (and fortune) – is describable as all of the above. This chapter examines how he and the industry which has sprung up around him personify and epitomise a particular kind of musical exotica. In both guises (as phenomenon and musician-composer), Yanni, the icon, has strong brand...

Information About the Authors

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pp. 190-191

Bibliography

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pp. 192-198

Index

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pp. 199-200