Cover

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Title Page, Acknowledgements, Copyright

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pp. 1-4

Contents

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pp. 5-6

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Introduction

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pp. 7-15

Beginning their lives as caterpillars (which, like humans, are earthbound), butterflies — fragile, ephemeral and ethereal — are connected to the human soul and to the possibility of transformation. Your involvement with butterflies will connect you to nature, allowing you to find your place within it. I...

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Swallowtails Papilionidae

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p. 16

Swallowtails are our largest butterflies and, except for Monarchs, probably the butterflies most often noticed. Most swallowtails are easy to recognize as swallowtail, because they are large and do have “tails.” However, the parnassians, large...

Parnassians Parnassiinae

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pp. 16-17

True Swallowtails Papilioninae

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pp. 18-35

Whites and Yellows Pieridae

Whites Pierinae

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pp. 36-51

Yellows Coliadinae

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pp. 52-73

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Gossamerwings Lycaenidae

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p. 74

Species in the well-named gossamerwing family (Lycaenidae) are usually small and delicate. Many species have iridescent blue or purple on their topsides. The caterpillars of many gossamerwing species associate with ants. The caterpillars possess special glands that secrete “honey-dew,” a sweet...

Coppers Lycaeninae

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pp. 74-82

Harvester Miletinae

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p. 83

Hairstreaks Theclinae

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pp. 84-121

Blues Polyommatinae

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pp. 122-145

Metalmarks Riodinidae

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pp. 146-157

Brushfoots Nymphalidae

Heliconians and Fritillaries Heliconiinae

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pp. 158-189

True Brushfoots Nymphalinae

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pp. 190-231

Admirals and Relatives Limenitidinae et al.

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pp. 232-245

Leafwings Charaxinae

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pp. 246-249

Emperors Apaturinae

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pp. 250-252

Snouts Libytheinae

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p. 253

Satyrs Satyrinae

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pp. 254-276

Ticlears, Clearwings Ithomiinae

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pp. 276-277

Mimic-Queen and Monarchs Danainae

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pp. 277-279

Skippers Hesperiidae

Firetips Pyrrhopyginae

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p. 280

Spreadwing Skippers Pyrginae

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pp. 280-331

Skipperlings Heteropterinae

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pp. 332-333

Grass-Skippers Hesperiinae

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pp. 334-393

Giant-Skippers Megathyminae

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pp. 394-399

Hawaii

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pp. 400-401

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Photo Credits

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p. 402

Photos are designated by page and photo number. 20:4,5 Jane Ruffin means that on page 20, the fourth photo (main photo of a Pink-spotted Swallowtail) and the fifth photo (inset photo of the underside of a Pink-spotted Swallowtail) were taken by Jane Ruffin. Photos are numbered from top panel to bottom panel, with the main (large photo) in each panel coming first and then the insets...

Selected Bibliography

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p. 403

Selected Websites

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p. 403

Caterpillar Foodplant Index

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pp. 404-407

Butterfly Species Index

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pp. 408-417

Visual Index

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pp. 418-420