Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

List of Figures

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgements

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

The award in 2011 of a Fellowship by the Arts and Humanities Research Council was integral to the completion of this project, as was study leave granted by the School of History at the University of Leeds. I am grateful to both institutions and can only hope the pages that follow vindicate their confidence. If...

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-8

In 1839 Mary Shelley took an unpublished sonnet, ‘England in 1820’, by her deceased husband and finally published it as ‘England in 1819’.1 Under a name Shelley never intended, this sonnet has had an enduring influence on how Regency Britain is conceptualised in literary and historical scholarship alike. The...

read more

1. The United Kingdom in 1820

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-43

On 1 January Joseph Farington rose at 8.20 a.m., feeling ‘very unwell’. This may explain why he failed to step outside his home in London’s Charlotte Street, as was his custom, to note the temperature. But he recorded in his diary that it was ‘a thick discoloured morng and day’. The temperature on rising on New Year’s...

read more

2. Winter’s end

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-69

In Britain, if not Ireland, the challenges confronting the Government at the New Year appeared to be receding. ‘The Accounts from the Country are improving’, the Home Secretary wrote to a Cabinet colleague on 2 January, ‘the loyal are becoming more confident, & the Radicals less so: but we must be constantly on...

read more

3. Politics high and low

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 70-104

Communal celebration of significant occasions was one of the invisible ties that bound British society together. In England the parish church was often at the centre of such commemorations. The ringing of lengthy peals of bells was the norm on the accession of the monarch, on his birthday and on 5 November to...

read more

4. Easter risings

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-134

‘Accounts from Manchester, Leeds, Glasgow, etc., are unsatisfactory’, Lord Sidmouth told the Duke of Wellington on 21 March: ‘A Simultaneous Explosion appears to be meditated at an early Period. Much will depend on the result of the Trials at York, Lancaster, Leicester and Warwick.’1 The Home Secretary was...

read more

5. Late spring and early summer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 135-165

There was scant sense of the tide of unrest abating during the remainder of April. In a speech on 18 March, George Canning had asked his Liverpool constituents ‘whether any country, in any two epochs, however distant, of its history, ever presented such a contrast with itself as this Country in November...

read more

6. Autumn

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 166-199

When the Duke of Berry, heir to the French throne, was stabbed to death on the steps of the Paris Opera in February his assassin (saddler Louis Pierre Louvel) was arrested immediately. But Louvel was not executed until 7 June, against a background of increasingly violent protest. On the 9th, close to the great Porte...

read more

7. Conclusions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 200-218

As 1820 drew to its close, there was little sense of achievement, still less triumphalism, within the Government. While staying at Wellington’s country home a few days before Christmas, the Prime Minister relaxed enough to play charades, ‘at which Lord Liverpool was very expert’. He drew the line, though...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 219-237

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 238-247