Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Figures

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

This work owes a great deal to the chiropractic historians who blazed a trail: Vern Gielow, Mervyn Zarbuck, Joseph Donahue, and Russell Gibbons. I owe a special debt to Joseph C. Keating Jr., who was an exceptional mentor for me and many other researchers in chiropractic history. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-13

The intent of this book is to treat chiropractic as a case study to explore a persistent overlap of beliefs and practices found in many American subcultures. It is neither possible or desirable to adjudicate the scientific status of something as heterogeneous as alternative medicine; regular and alternative medicine are not scientific descriptors, ...

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One: The First Adjustment

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pp. 14-52

A person seeking treatment for the first time is quite likely to be suffering from back pain. Chiropractors maintain the practice can help many conditions, but spinal and musculoskeletal problems are patients’ primary reasons for initial visits. A patient’s first impressions draw comparisons to a new patient visit with a physician. ...

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Two: A Magnetic Healer in Iowa

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pp. 53-84

“Foxy Grandpa” was a self-given nickname D. D. Palmer used in later life. It was an appropriate sobriquet. D. D. was a shrewd man who seldom missed an opportunity for personal profit. His erratic behavior prompted those around him to question his sanity. Even so, one is led to wonder whether D. D. wasn’t “crazy like a fox.” ...

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Three: From Vital Magnetism to Vertebral Vitalism

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pp. 85-108

By January 1897, D. D. had begun to charge for the monthly advertorials, setting a yearly subscription at twenty-five cents. He also had retitled his newspaper The Chiropractic, explaining that the new name was meant to introduce chiropractic as a practice “done by hand.” The name was bestowed by Rev. Samuel Weed, who was won over after D. D. healed first his daughter and then Weed himself. ...

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Four: On the Frontier of the New Profession

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pp. 109-146

At the time of his departure for California, D. D. may have intended the handoff of the Palmer enterprise to B. J. only as a legal measure to protect the property in which he maintained an interest. Yet D. D. was an abrupt man, inclined to cut his losses through the failures of several marriages and commercial ventures. It is just as likely that D. D. had put his Davenport operation behind him when he left for California. ...

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Five: Chiropractors on Parade

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pp. 147-190

The early twentieth century was a time of rapid growth and development for chiropractic. The basic logic of vitalism meant healing systems could be defined in both religious and scientific terms. Curiously, in the case of early chiropractic, these different presentations unfolded simultaneously. ...

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Six: History Repeats

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pp. 191-252

The last the world would hear for years about D. D. Palmer’s version of chiropractic was in a book posthumously published by D. D.’s wife, Mary, in 1914. Many of the articles in The Chiropractor addressed human biology from the perspective of D. D.’s “tonal” theory. The collection also included “The Moral and Religious Duty of a Chiropractor,” which D. D. had circulated, ...

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Seven: The World of Chiropractic

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pp. 253-278

In 1970 the profession stood at a perilously low 13,000 chiropractors, but within twenty years, that number more than tripled. Not only is chiropractic more accepted now than at any previous point in its history, it is perhaps better positioned than any other alternative healing system to emerge over the past 200 years. ...

Notes

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pp. 279-304

Bibliography

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pp. 305-340

Index

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pp. 341-351