Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Foreword

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pp. ix-xii

The history of the Second Vatican Council and the history of the policy of openness towards the East-Central European Communist countries, that is, the so called Vatican “Ostpolitik,” were looked at until now as two separate topics of research. The virtue of András Fejérdy’s work is to demonstrate, at the end of a thorough-going study through various available archives ...

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Preface and acknowledgements

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pp. xiii-xvi

This book examines the history of Hungarian participation in the Second Vatican Council within the context of Hungarian ecclesiastical policy and the development of Vatican–Hungarian relations. It is thus not exclusively a work on church history but the results of research which, beyond the perspective of church history in the stricter sense of the word, ...

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xvii-xx

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

The Second Vatican Council is perhaps the most important event in the twentieth-century history of the Catholic Church. Among the possible approaches to this momentous happening, in recent years those studies dealing with the participation of the bishops and theologians of the various countries, and their impact on the Council’s work, are receiving ever greater space. ...

Part I. The (Ante-) Preparatory Phase of the Council (1959–1962)

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1. The Holy See

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pp. 11-36

Pope John XXIII announced the convocation of a new ecumenical council on January 25, 1959.1 The 17 cardinals attending the consistory held in the Benedictine monastery beside the Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls at the end of the week of prayer for Christian unity were surprised by the pope’s announcement. It was not the idea of the Council that caused this surprise, ...

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2. The Hungarian People’s Republic

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pp. 37-68

When Pope John XXIII announced his desire to convoke a new ecumenical council, a new model of church policy was already being elaborated in Hungary. Naturally, the ultimate aim of Communist church policy remained the complete liquidation of religion and Church; however, the gradual transformation of the domestic and international climate prompted the party to make certain tactical changes. ...

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3. The Catholic Church in Hungary

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pp. 69-98

When Pope John XXIII announced the future Second Vatican Council, the state of the Hungarian Catholic Church was determined by the sum of several forces, each fueled by a different source. The most prominent—and perhaps most significant—is without doubt the anti-Church (and increasingly anti-religious) policy outlined above, which, while striving to reduce the weight of the Church in society, ...

Part II. Hungary and the Holy See during the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965)

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1. The Holy See: Council and Ostpolitik

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pp. 101-162

John XXIII had a definite notion of the tasks the Council must address. However, he had not given his colleagues specific guidance, nor had he intervened in the preparatory work. Moving forward, Pope Paul VI, who himself considered it important for the Council to expound its doctrine organically while building around a central theme, in line with a proposal by Cardinal Archbishop Léon-Joseph Suenens ...

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2. The Hungarian People’s Republic: Council and “Vatican policy”

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pp. 163-238

Despite the hoped-for positives the decision by Hungarian political leadership to permit some bishops to participate in the Second Vatican Council counted as a risky one. The church-policy leader’s plans for the Council had to be carried out not under “consolidated” domestic conditions but far from the country’s borders, in a milieu that was considered expressly hostile. ...

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3. Controlled Freedom: The Hungarian Catholic Church and the Second Vatican Council

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pp. 239-310

It is a peculiarity of the Hungarian church policy situation of the time that in the case of Hungarian attendance at the Second Vatican Council we must speak of a council delegation. In fact, the right and obligation to attend is tied to the ecclesiastical offices defined in canon law and stipulates attendance in person (CIC 1917 can. 223, 225). The chief pastors of a country, ...

Part III. Epilogue: After the Council

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1. Holy See: Dialogue and Ostpolitik

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pp. 313-326

The modern image of the Church and the world formulated at Vatican II represented a turning-point both within the Church itself as well as in the relationship between the Church and the world. The new outlook focused on the importance of dialogue, which was realized towards the world in three areas. The Secretariat for Christian Unity, set up in 1960, ...

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2. The Hungarian People’s Republic

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pp. 327-346

Vatican II did not bring about a significant change in the Communist parties’ image of the Church: they continued to regard the Holy See as a center of power that did not simply oppose Communism in the ideological sphere, but conducted first and foremost a political struggle against it. ...

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3. The Hungarian Church

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pp. 347-360

The Hungarian ecclesiastical reception of the Second Vatican Council began already during the sessions. Nevertheless, the fact that only some of the bishops could follow the work and debates of the Council in person influenced the reception to a significant degree. During the first session even they gained information on the proceedings of the Council primarily from the Hungarian press ...

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Summary

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pp. 361-366

Summarizing the results of our research, it may be stated first and foremost that it was the coincidence of the interests of three factors that made the Hungarian council fathers’ travel possible. The role of catalyst was played by Pope John XXIII, elected in 1958, who regarded it as an urgent task that the Holy See re-establish the ties with the Church behind the Iron Curtain that were severed in the late 1940s. ...

Chronology

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pp. 367-390

Annex 1. Hungarian participants in the Second Vatican Council and their escorts

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pp. 391-397

Annex 2. Hungarian council fathers de iure and de facto

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p. 398

Annex 3. Hungarian contributions to the work of the Council

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pp. 399-400

Sources and Bibliography

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pp. 401-420

Index

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pp. 421-426

Back Cover

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p. 427