Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Maps, Table, and Chart

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

I am deeply grateful. . . . For the support I received while working on this project, including a Presidential Fellowship from the History Department at Boston College, an American Fellowship from the AAUW, and a Summer Research Grant from the State University of New York-College at Old Westbury. ...

read more

Introduction: Latino Migration and the Ruins of Industrial America

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-20

In the summer of 1984, two furious crowds faced off along a narrow, tenement-lined street in Lawrence, Massachusetts. In a race riot that would bring international attention to this small city, white and Latino rioters exploded in a rage that had been building in the city for years. ...

read more

1. The Urban/Suburban Divide

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-52

In 1965, the cover of the town of Andover’s annual report featured a simple, striking illustration of a Pilgrim wearing an astronaut’s space helmet. There could not have been a better image to capture the postwar identity of Lawrence’s suburban neighbor. The small New England town of Andover prided itself on its three-and-a-half-century history and its democratic traditions, ...

read more

2. Why Lawrence?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 53-89

In 1992, the director of Lawrence’s Minority Business Council, Jose Zaiter, told his family’s migration story to the local paper, explaining that it was typical of how many Latinos ended up in Lawrence. His family had moved from the Dominican Republic to New York City in 1965. A year later, his uncle left New York for Lawrence and got a job in the city’s garment industry. ...

read more

3. Struggling for the City

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 90-120

Latino settlement in Lawrence was no simple matter. As the city’s economy spiraled downward, and as neighborhoods deteriorated from waves of demolition and white flight, many Lawrencians looked for a scapegoat. The growing number of Latinos in Lawrence in the 1970s correlated with the city’s decline, ...

read more

4. The Riots of 1984

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-153

For two nights in August 1984, hundreds of white and Latino Lawrencians faced off along Oxford Street in Lawrence’s Lower Tower Hill neighborhood. Banging on metal garbage cans and yelling racial slurs and insults, the two crowds hurled rocks and Molotov cocktails at each other as neighbors shouted down from triple-decker balconies or cowered in fear inside their apartments. ...

read more

5. Forcing Change

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 154-183

The disturbios in the streets of Lawrence in 1984 cracked the city open and exposed its meanest divisions and hypocrisies. The rage of Lawrence’s disaffected was irrefutable, and the media loudly trumpeted the city’s most shameful failures. These circumstances generated tremendous political capital for those who could harness it, ...

read more

6. The Armpit of the Northeast?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 184-215

In 1992, the Immigrant City was in flames. The waves of arson peaked during the summer months, when fires blazed nightly in Lawrence, lighting up the small city’s skyline of crumbling clock towers and abandoned brick mills. The frequent fires sometimes drew gawkers from the surrounding suburbs (otherwise rare visitors to the troubled city), ...

read more

7. Creating the Latino City

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 216-245

The crowdsourced UrbanDictionary.com defines “Lawtown,” a common slang term for Lawrence, as “the center of [the] Latin Universe in all of New England.”1 That’s a big title for a small city, but it fits. In spite of its economic struggles, Lawrence remains a major Latino settlement site to this day, and it is home to the largest concentration of Dominicans outside New York City.2 ...

read more

Conclusion: Latino Urbanism and the Geography of Opportunity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 246-254

As the twentieth century drew to a close, Lawrence barely resembled the city it had been at the end of World War II. While its landscape was still dominated by brick mills and triple-decker homes, its economy and population had been profoundly transformed by suburbanization, deindustrialization, and Latino immigration. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-292

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-316

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 317-325