Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-x

Over the last twenty-five years, I have served the citizens and the government of the United States. I have been a soldier (a private, a noncommissioned officer, and an officer) in the U.S. Army. My assignments have been unique, enriching, and demanding. As a teenager, I...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

Chapter 2 (“Reasonable Chance of Success: Analyzing the Postwar Requirements of Jus Ad Bellum”) was originally published in Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War (Just War Theory in the 21st Century), edited by Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans, and Adam Henschke, (Routledge...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

The nonideal conditions we face often involve conditions or circumstances of unjust international attacks and/or unjust domestic institutions that might seem to call for war as a just response. While war might be permissible as a response to severe injustice, there are limits on the...

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1. Right Intention and a Just and Lasting Peace

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pp. 9-40

Historically, the norm of right intention has been a constitutive part of the ad bellum phase of just war theory, and “aims to overcome the possibility that a state may have a just cause, but still act from a wrong intention.”1 Wrong intentions aim or intend acts or effects (e.g., punishing...

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2. Reasonable Chance of Success: Analyzing Postwar Requirements in the Ad Bellum Phase

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pp. 41-58

Just because a war ends, it does not necessarily mean that the death and dying are over. Repeatedly, civilians are harmed during the postwar phase by foreseeable but unintended consequences, the residual effects of war, and poorly planned postwar occupation. Not only is it important that...

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3. Post Bellum Obligations of Noncombatant Immunity

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pp. 59-84

War has three distinct phases: prewar, war, and postwar. Within the just war tradition the postwar period has received the least amount of attention. However, over the past decade a groundswell of discussion of the postwar phase has occurred. But, as of yet, no set of moral principles...

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4. Negative and Positive Corresponding Duties of the Responsibility to Protect

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pp. 85-126

In the spring of 1994, members of the Hutu tribe viciously slaughtered almost 800,000 Tutsis in a genocide campaign in Rwanda while the international community sat back and let the madness unfold. Not only were the Hutus morally culpable for their heinous acts, but every state...

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5. Justified Drone Strikes are Predicated on Responsibility to Protect Norms

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pp. 127-144

The United States has conducted personality and signature drone strikes1 into Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, and possibly other states. The United States conducts drone strikes in these areas in order to disrupt, dismantle, and defeat terrorist organizations (such as...

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6. Updating the Fourth Geneva Convention

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pp. 145-164

The postwar phase has an established history in just war theory, and it has received a considerable amount of attention over the last decade. Although the postwar phase seems to be the focus of many current just war debates and philosophical works, law and practice concerning...

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Conclusion

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pp. 165-168

Just war theory not only establishes a framework regarding when the use of force is morally justified (such as in cases of self-defense) but also sets limits to the destructive acts of war by appealing to standards of conduct that incorporate discrimination (distinction), proportionality...

Notes

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pp. 169-194

Bibliography

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pp. 195-204

Index

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pp. 205-208

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Vita

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pp. 209-211

Todd Burkhardt is a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army. Over the last twenty-five years he has served in variety of positions as an enlisted tank crewman and infantry officer, including deployments to Saudi Arabia and Afghanistan. He has also spent more than five years at the United...