Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xvi

Historian John Higham has noted that "in almost every generation one or more historians have been among the leading lights of American culture, and their books have exemplified some of its most pronounced characteristics. The writing of American history has always had, therefore, an intimate relation to history in the making."1 ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-xviii

I would like to thank the following for permission to quote from the published writings of Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.: ...

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1. Origins of Schlesinger's Frame of Acceptance

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pp. 1-15

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., developed his political perspective in response to tensions and challenges that faced him and other liberals who came of age in America during the 1930s and 1940s. In his early years as an academic historian and political activist, Schlesinger would begin to develop and express his views on human nature, ...

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2. The Age of Jackson and The Age of Roosevelt: A Foundation for Ideological History

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pp. 16-30

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., quickly climbed the academic ladder in his chosen profession as practicing historian. From the beginning of his years at Harvard as graduate fellow and later as professor of history, his work in the field of American history was prolific and popular. His first major book, The Age of Jackson (1945), ...

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3. From the New Deal to Camelot: Ideological History in Action

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pp. 31-48

By the beginning of the 1950s, according to Michael Wreszin, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., "was admired across the entire spectrum of the culture." "The world was his oyster," writes Wreszin, "and Washington his favorite city."1 Never satisfied with being an academician, Schlesinger took unmistakable steps to leave the ivory tower during the next decade. ...

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4. The Tides of National Politics and the Rhetoric of Dawnism

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pp. 49-60

John Kenneth Galbraith coined the term "dawnism" to describe the "Democratic style of hyperbole" practiced by John Kennedy and others during the 1960s. According to Galbraith, the rhetoric of dawnism held out the "natural if adolescent ... hope that some new leader, some new policy, will bring the dawn of a new day."1 ...

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5. In the Halls of Power, 1961–1965

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pp. 61-76

After years of supporting liberal candidates and causes, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., anxiously awaited the arrival in the White House of John F. Kennedy, someone whom he believed had the character to be the "right man for the big job."1 There was hope that the conservative tide in America had turned and that a new liberal agenda would be undertaken. ...

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6. Vietnam and Violence, 1965–1972

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pp. 77-98

After the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., stayed on as assistant to the new Johnson administration for only a few months, then left the executive branch to work on A Thousand Days. His memoir of the Kennedy White House earned him the Pulitzer Prize for biography in 1965. ...

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7. Liberalism in Retreat, 1972–1993

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pp. 99-124

In the years since 1970, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., has remained active as both historian and political advocate. In The Imperial Presidency (1973), Schlesinger examined both the constitutional origins of and growth in presidential power. While asserting that presidential power in foreign affairs had grown dangerously unchecked, ...

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8. Conclusion

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pp. 125-136

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., has always maintained that historical understanding and insight should play an important role in defining communal values and shaping social policies in the present. In a world now characterized by the increasing velocity of history; Schlesinger wrote in 1986, "change is scary; uncharted change, demoralizing." ...

Notes

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pp. 137-172

Bibliography

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pp. 173-186

Index

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pp. 187-192

About the Series

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