Cover

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Half Title, Series Titles, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction

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pp. vii-xii

The chapters that compose this volume are based on papers presented at the 2015 Georgetown University Roundtable on Language and Linguistics whose theme was ‘Diversity and Super-Diversity: Sociocultural Linguistic Perspectives.’ The volume is a collection of works by the plenary speakers as well as papers that we regard as most representative of the issues presented and discussed at that exciting event, ...

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1. Chronotopic Identities: On the Timespace Organization of Who We Are

Jan Blommaert, Anna De Fina

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pp. 1-16

Super-diversity offers scholars a broad range of opportunities to revise and rethink parts of their conceptual vocabulary in attempts to arrive at more sensitive and accurate tools for thought and analysis. The recognition of a reality that might, in some respects and to some degree, have always been there but was never enregistered in theoretical and methodological frameworks might, in fact, be seen as the most productive outcome of the current debates over whether or not super-diversity is “new.” ...

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2. “Whose Story?”: Narratives of Persecution, Flight, and Survival Told by the Children of Austrian Holocaust Survivors

Ruth Wodak, Markus Rheindorf

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pp. 17-36

Since 1999, a group of descendants of former Austrian resistance fighters and refugees, born between 1940 and 1955, has held biannual meetings in Vienna. They call these meetings Kinderjause (a compound of German Kinder [children] and Jause [a casual meeting for tea, cake, or sandwiches]) in reminiscence of their common past. They share a past in the sense that in their childhood and youth they were an objectively marginalized social group ...

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3. Linguistic Landscape: Interpreting and Expanding Language Diversities

Elana Shohamy

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pp. 37-64

It was a special opportunity for me to be invited to deliver a plenary at the GURT 2015 conference, eight years after presenting a plenary at GURT 2007 on the related theme of Sustaining Linguistic Diversity: Endangered and Minority Languages and Language Varieties. The title of the 2007 plenary was: Oppressive Methods of Suppressing Diversities for Hebrew Revival (Shohamy 2008). ...

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4. A Competence for Negotiating Diversity and Unpredictability in Global Contact Zones

Suresh Canagarajah

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pp. 65-80

As language use changes in the context of super-diversity, there are new questions about what constitutes effective competence for communication. My ongoing research with multilingually skilled migrants suggests an orientation to competence that deviates from what dominant models in applied linguistics have theorized. The differences are so fundamental that they go to the heart of what we assume as intelligible and successful communication. ...

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5. The Strategic Use of Address Terms in Multilingual Interactions during Family Mealtimes

Fatma Said, Zhu Hua

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pp. 81-96

The notion of super-diversity was proposed by Vertovec (2007) to address the changing nature of global migration characterized by “a dynamic interplay of variables among an increased number of new, small and scattered, multiple-origin, transnationally connected, socio-economically differentiated and legally stratified immigrants” (1024). ...

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6. Everyday Encounters in the Marketplace: Translanguaging in the Super-Diverse City

Adrian Blackledge, Angela Creese, Rachel Hu

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pp. 97-116

Wessendorf (2014) conceptualizes the normalization of difference as “commonplace diversity” to describe ethnic, religious, linguistic, and socioeconomic diversity experienced and perceived as a normal part of social life (44). She argues that diversity becomes normalized over time and as a result of accumulated experiences of difference: ...

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7. (In)convenient Fictions: Ideologies of Multilingual Competence as Resource for Recognizability

Elizabeth R. Miller

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pp. 117-132

In this chapter, I explore how adult immigrants to the United States, in producing accounts of their multilingual workplace discursive practices and their complex linguistic repertoires, frequently reconstituted traditional or high-modern ideological categories of language (as autonomous systems), conflated language-ethnicityculture-nation as “natural” linkages, ...

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8. Constructed Dialogue, Stance, and Ideological Diversity in Metalinguistic Discourse

Anastasia Nylund

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pp. 133-150

This chapter investigates stancetaking toward language among African American residents of Washington, DC. I argue that taking stances toward language and its role in their community, which Jaffe (2009a) terms metasociolinguistic stancetaking, allows speakers to negotiate their own and others’ roles with respect to the complex, circulating discourses surrounding race, place, and identity ...

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9. Citizen Sociolinguistics: A New Media Methodology for Understanding Language and Social Life

Betsy Rymes, Geeta Aneja, Andrea Leone-Pizzighella, Mark Lewis, Robert Moore

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pp. 151-170

Sociolinguistics, conversation analysis, and Linguistic Anthropology are increasingly overlapping fields broadly concerned with how language and communication are intertwined with social relations. While each of these perspectives has illuminated elements of language in use, or sociocultural linguistics, the sophistication of the research subjects and their own detailed understandings of their language practices ...

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10. Recasting Diversity in Language Education in Postcolonial, Late-Capitalist Societies

Luisa Martín Rojo, Christine Anthonissen, Inmaculada García-Sánchez, Virginia Unamuno

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pp. 171-190

Social realities of increasing (super-)diversity, mobility, and the corresponding high appraisal of linguistic competences and skills are currently not developing—as was expected—into egalitarian systems and structures in multilingual communities. To the contrary, much evidence of how former inequalities, prejudices, and social and linguistic hierarchies ...

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11. Diversity in School: Monolingual Ideologies versus Multilingual Practices

Anna De Fina

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pp. 191-208

Contact zones, or “social spaces where cultures meet, clash and grapple with each other” (Pratt, 1991, 34) have become more and more widespread in the late modern world as globalization has radically increased population flows and transnational exchanges. Thus, even countries that have been traditional sites of emigration rather than immigration, such as Italy, have seen a complete reversal, turning into points of arrival for people from all over the globe. ...

Contributors

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pp. 209-214

Index

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pp. 215-222