Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Series Editor’s Preface

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pp. ix-x

IT IS A DISTINCT PLEASURE to be able to introduce the first book in the new Contemporary Buddhism series from University of Hawai‛i Press. Following in the groundbreaking steps of George Tanabe’s Topics in Contemporary Buddhism, this series will continue to deliver the finest narratives and analyses of doctrine, institutions, personalities, ritual, gender, politics, economics, performance, and art in any cultural area of the Buddhist world today....

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

MY DAUGHTER JANE IS USUALLY QUITE RESERVED, slow to warm up to new people. However, one day, at the Gilsangsa Monastery in Seoul, South Korea, she grabbed a young monk’s arm and just started laughing. She was six years old, and she had come with me on a little research trip to a quiet residential neighborhood to see this monastery that had been home to one of modern Korea’s most popular monks, Venerable Beopjeong Sunim (1932–2010). I went to this temple not just because it was a renowned Jogye meditation center, but also because it was promoted by my friends in Seoul as a place for relaxation, good food, and a farmer’s market. I thought my daughter would enjoy being out of the bustle of hypermodern high-rise Seoul for an afternoon....

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Introduction

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pp. 1-29

FROM THE HEAD OF THE BODHISATTVA GUANYIN you can see the shore. The series of inlets and tiny islands along it was covered with trees and dotted with homes before the tsunami flattened many of them. Guanyin was fine though. She is quite tall and a good distance from the ocean. This statue, the sixth tallest in the world, stands awkwardly on the top of a small hill outside of Sendai, along the coast in the Tohoku region of northern Japan. There she stood for twenty years before the tsunami, and she will probably stand silently for many more as roads are repaired, shops reopened, and schools rebuilt. She might be the last of her kind though. She was constructed in the...

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Chapter One. Monuments and Metabolism: Kenzo Tange and the Attempts to Bring New Architecture to Buddhism’s Oldest Site

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pp. 30-81

IN 2013 I HAD THE MOST ENJOYABLE research trip of my career. My ten-year-old son, Henry, and I made a trip to a park memorializing the history, religion, and culture of Vietnam. This museum and memorial to the greatness of the Vietnamese people is on the grounds of Vietnam’s largest amusement park, the Suối Tiên Amusement Park, in the suburbs of Saigon (Ho Chi Minh City) in South Vietnam. The entrance fees are relatively manageable for a middle-class urban family in Saigon, and foreigners have to pay a slightly higher price. Suối Tiên (Fairy Stream) is not officially a Buddhist...

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Chapter Two. Ecumenical Parks and Cosmological Gardens: Braphai and Lek Wiriyaphan and Buddhist Spectacle Culture

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pp. 82-130

IN 1937, TWO BUDDHIST BROTHERS FROM BURMA NAMED Aw Boon Haw and Aw Boon Par, who had amassed a fortune inventing and selling Tiger Balm (a soothing and cooling camphor-like balm for muscle pain, headaches, rashes, and the like), opened up their own amusement park, called Tiger Balm Gardens. Although it did not have rides, its sculpture gardens, large dioramas, fake mountains, and inviting fountains were a popular place of leisure for families. The park offered regularly scheduled performances of Chinese operas, moralist dramas, concerts, and circus-like acts. While it was not a Buddhist park directly, many of the displays were Buddhist....

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Chapter Three. Buddhist Museums and Curio Cabinets: Shi Fa Zhao and Ecumenism without an Agenda

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pp. 131-161

IN 1894, A FREEMASON WHO WOULD LATER CREATE the first Buddhist temple museum in the United States traded a collection of engraved gems for a professorship at the University of Pennsylvania. His name was Maxwell Sommerville. This eccentric collector was a prominent member of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Philadelphia, where a portrait of him still hangs, and spent much time walking between the large lodge next to city hall on Broad Street and the new University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology on Thirty-Third Street. On the streets he was the picture of a wealthy Caucasian aristocrat, in a black topcoat and...

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Conclusions and Comparisons

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pp. 162-176

THE SCENT OF CAMELLIA HUNG IN THE thick jungle air. One at a time, beads of sweat clung to the tip of my nose before dropping onto the camera hanging from my neck. I stared through the tree branches at the centuries-old wooden buddha image. The intensely spicy breakfast I had eaten was agreeing with my stomach no more than my nerves were agreeing with the fact that I had seen several crocodiles on my jungle trek to the shrine. I had trouble understanding the local dialect, had gotten lost several times, and kept wondering if this trip was worth it. I had come a long way. Finally, I was seated in front of a very rare Chinese statue of the Buddha on a stone...

Notes

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pp. 177-204

Bibliography

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pp. 205-214

Index

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pp. 215-224

About the Author

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pp. 225-226