Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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p. viii

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Preface

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pp. xii-xviii

"It occurs to me that my title may seem a little misleading once one realizes that my subject implicitly deals at least as much with Lacan as it does with James. My decision to leave Lacan out, however, comes not so much out of a furtive desire to deceive the reader as from an intent to emphasize how the psychoanalytic concepts I will be dealing with here make..."

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1

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pp. 1-41

"Few of James’s novels have generated as much reader frustration as The Portrait of a Lady. While Isabel’s final decision to return to Osmond famously had such supportive contemporary readers as Grace Norton confessing to having thrown the book across the room in vexation, our collective irritation today at what seems like James’s distinctly perverse refusal to..."

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2

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pp. 43-97

"In his landmark study of The Wings of the Dove,1 Peter Brooks sets the terms for what has subsequently become one of the major thrusts in the novel’s critical reception.2 For Brooks, the novel has as its central concern the question of representation and its limit, or as he puts it, the 'abyss of..."

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3

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pp. 99-145

"In this chapter I want to turn back to some of the issues I began with, back, that is, to what might be considered the 'burning' question of ethical thought, the question of universality.1 It was the concept of universality, after all, that Hegel addressed when he came to consider the dialectic of human and divine laws in his discussion of the Ethical Community..."

Notes

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pp. 147-163

Works Cited

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pp. 165-171

Index

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pp. 173-177